Flatstrami -vs- Chuckstrami ~ Which Will Come Out On Top?

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thirdeye

Master of the Pit
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Dec 1, 2019
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The Cowboy State - Wyoming
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Today was a showdown between a Sam's Club "Member's Mark" branded corned beef that I pastramied..., and a 13-day home corned chuck roast that I wet brined and pastramied. Both were in the 4# range. I used the same rub, and cooked at the same time and temp. Both had a pressure finish to an internal of 203°+. Because of the divided muscle structure on the chuck, I did try a sample (it was like a burnt end).... but both will be resting for several hours.

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I was hoping you would start a thread on the cured chuck that you mentioned in another thread.
Oh wow, you topped it with a double take.
I've made pastrami a few times from bagged corned beef. None turned out post worthy.
Brisket has gotten so ridiculous priced that I'm looking for alternatives, too.
 
I'll be watching also. I picked up a couple of those CB's at Sam's last week, thinking pastrami thoughts. RAY
 
The biggest issue with Chuckstrami, the grain runs vertically. To get across the grain slices, you have to separate muscle groups. When sliced you get 2 overly seasoned slices an a couple slices without spices.
Now a Chuck Eye Roll would make some great Pastrami ...JJ

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Fun experiment!! I don't see how either could be bad, just one possibly better than the other. Please keep us posted on the final results.
 
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This was much harder than I thought it would be. Each piece had it's own set of positives and negatives. Both meats were 'corned', the Member's Mark had the traditional strong corned beef injectable brine. For the chuck I used a homemade curing brine with a lot of (corning) aromatics, injected about 10% by weight, then used the rest as a cover brine. I did use some AmesPhos, and the Member's Mark also listed 'phosphates' on the label.

Flatstrami - The color was typical of corned beef. Good flavor and the salt level was acceptable because I did a 7 hour soak-out. The fat content was higher than the chuck, and the marbling was more even throughout. Tenderness was great, I did a 42 minute pressure finish and a 3 hour rest. The flat definitely gets the nod in the slicing department, very important for sandwiches.

Chuckstrami - The color was a deep red (more myoglobin?). Good flavor and the saltiness was spot on. I used 80 grams of salt (30 grams of white sugar) in 1 gallon of brine. Cure time was 13 days. There were more pockets and veins of fat, and less overall marbling, but the meat was still moist (AmesPhos helped). The tenderness was great, I did a 35 minute pressure finish. The grain structure did not allow for thin slices, but the bites had that burnt end mouthfeel.

On a scale of 1 to 10..... I would give the Flatstrami an 8.5 (considering the slice-ability and serve-ability factors). We scored the Chuckstrami an 8. So very, very close. Had this been a one bite challenge, and not considering slicing, the scores would have been reversed giving the Chuckstrami the win.

Next up on the bucket list will be corning some short ribs, pork country ribs or a prime point I have in the freezer, and pastrami them.
 
Sounds like your having some fun!
They both look good to me, but I’d go with the flat pastrami.
Al
 
I was hoping you would start a thread on the cured chuck that you mentioned in another thread.
Oh wow, you topped it with a double take.
I've made pastrami a few times from bagged corned beef. None turned out post worthy.
Brisket has gotten so ridiculous priced that I'm looking for alternatives, too.
I struggle to find chuck on sale for $4.50/lb and I saw prime brisket at Sam's this week at about the same price. I generally do a soak on the store-bought ones, then season and rest about 15 hours before smoking, and use low pit temps. Instead of a wrapped or steam finish, I do a pressure finish.
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I'll be watching also. I picked up a couple of those CB's at Sam's last week, thinking pastrami thoughts. RAY

Sounds like your having some fun!
They both look good to me, but I’d go with the flat pastrami.
Al
I've never had an issue with good quality store-bought corned beef but I stick to one brand. When I bought this one I had about 25 to choose from, and it seems they are cutting them larger than usual.

Ive pastrami'd a few chucks but would rather shred than slice them. Flavor is always great.

Yep I like shredded for hash or for a cheese melt sandwich, and pizza topping too.
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Both look good. I usually buy 4 Corned Points, in March, for making Pastrami throughout the year...JJ
 
Beef is out pricing lumber around here.
We had strip loin skewers for supper. The price for strip loin has more than doubled since I bought them in March.
I had to pass up on a reasonably priced prime brisket a week ago due to cooler space
 
I struggle to find chuck on sale for $4.50/lb and I saw prime brisket at Sam's this week at about the same price. I generally do a soak on the store-bought ones, then season and rest about 15 hours before smoking, and use low pit temps. Instead of a wrapped or steam finish, I do a pressure finish.
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I've never had an issue with good quality store-bought corned beef but I stick to one brand. When I bought this one I had about 25 to choose from, and it seems they are cutting them larger than usual.



Yep I like shredded for hash or for a cheese melt sandwich, and pizza topping too.
View attachment 504512
I need to try a pastrami pizza! maybe with a garlic sauce !!!!!!!
 
The biggest issue with Chuckstrami, the grain runs vertically. To get across the grain slices, you have to separate muscle groups. When sliced you get 2 overly seasoned slices an a couple slices without spices.
Now a Chuck Eye Roll would make some great Pastrami ...JJ

View attachment 504432
View attachment 504497

This was much harder than I thought it would be. Each piece had it's own set of positives and negatives. Both meats were 'corned', the Member's Mark had the traditional strong corned beef injectable brine. For the chuck I used a homemade curing brine with a lot of (corning) aromatics, injected about 10% by weight, then used the rest as a cover brine. I did use some AmesPhos, and the Member's Mark also listed 'phosphates' on the label.

Flatstrami - The color was typical of corned beef. Good flavor and the salt level was acceptable because I did a 7 hour soak-out. The fat content was higher than the chuck, and the marbling was more even throughout. Tenderness was great, I did a 42 minute pressure finish and a 3 hour rest. The flat definitely gets the nod in the slicing department, very important for sandwiches.

Chuckstrami - The color was a deep red (more myoglobin?). Good flavor and the saltiness was spot on. I used 80 grams of salt (30 grams of white sugar) in 1 gallon of brine. Cure time was 13 days. There were more pockets and veins of fat, and less overall marbling, but the meat was still moist (AmesPhos helped). The tenderness was great, I did a 35 minute pressure finish. The grain structure did not allow for thin slices, but the bites had that burnt end mouthfeel.

On a scale of 1 to 10..... I would give the Flatstrami an 8.5 (considering the slice-ability and serve-ability factors). We scored the Chuckstrami an 8. So very, very close. Had this been a one bite challenge, and not considering slicing, the scores would have been reversed giving the Chuckstrami the win.

Next up on the bucket list will be corning some short ribs, pork country ribs or a prime point I have in the freezer, and pastrami them.
Same issues I’ve had … mainly sliceability … otherwise been happy with chuck (and top round to lesser extent)
 
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