Info on Smoke Ring in BBQ

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shooterrick

Master of the Pit
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Jan 13, 2008
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Just ran across this and thought it was worth a look.

Smoke Ring in Barbeque Meats
How to Get That Coveted Pink Ring With Your Cooking
by Joe Cordray

Slow cooked barbecue meats often exhibit a pink ring around the outside edge of the product. This pink ring may range from 1/8 inch to 1/2 inch thick. In beef the ring is a reddish-pink and in pork, chicken and turkey it is bright pink. This pink ring is often referred to as a "smoke ring" and is considered a prized attribute in many barbecue meats, especially barbecue beef briskets. Barbecue connoiseurs feel the presence of a smoke ring indicates the item was slow smoked for a long period of time. Occasionally consumers have mistakenly felt that the pink color of the smoke ring meant the meat was undercooked. To understand smoke ring formation you must first understand muscle pigment.

Myoglobin is the pigment that gives muscle its color. Beef muscle has more pigment than pork muscle thus beef has a darker color than pork. Chicken thighs have a darker color than chicken breast thus chicken thigh muscle has more muscle pigment (myoglobin) than chicken breast tissue. A greater myoglobin concentration yields a more intense color. When you first cut into a muscle you expose the muscle pigment in its native state, myoglobin. In the case of beef, myoglobin has a purplish-red color. After the myoglobin has been exposed to oxygen for a short time, it becomes oxygenated and oxymyoglobin is formed. Oxymyoglobin is the color we associate with fresh meat. The optimum fresh meat color in beef is bright cherry red and in pork bright grayish pink. If a cut of meat is held under refrigeration for several days, the myoglobin on the surface becomes oxidized. When oxymyoglobin is oxidized it becomes metmyoglobin. Metmyoglobin has a brown color and is associated with a piece of meat that has been cut for several days. When we produce cured products we also alter the state of the pigment myoglobin. Cured products are defined as products to which we add sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite during processing. Examples of cured products are ham, bacon, bologna and hotdogs. All of these products have a pink color, which is typical of cured products. When sodium nitrite is combined with meat the pigment myoglobin is converted to nitric oxide myoglobin which is a very dark red color. This state of the pigment myoglobin is not very stable. Upon heating, nitric oxide myoglobin is converted to nitrosylhemochrome, which is the typical pink color of cured meats.
When a smoke ring develops in barbecue meats it is not because smoke has penetrated and colored the muscle, but rather because gases in the smoke interact with the pigment myoglobin. Two phenomenon provide evidence that it is not the smoke itself that causes the smoke ring. First, it is possible to have a smoke ring develop in a product that has not been smoked and second, it is also possible to heavily smoke a product without smoke ring development.

Most barbecuers use either wood chips or logs to generate smoke when cooking. Wood contains large amounts of nitrogen (N). During burning the nitrogen in the logs combines with oxygen (O) in the air to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Nitrogen dioxide is highly water-soluble. The pink ring is created when NO2 is absorbed into the moist meat surface and reacts to form nitrous acid. The nitrous acid then diffuses inward creating a pink ring via the classic meat curing reaction of sodium nitrite. The end result is a "smoke ring" that has the pink color of cured meat. Smoke ring also frequently develops in smokehouses and cookers that are gas-fired because NO2 is a combustion by-product when natural gas or propane is burned.

Let’s review the conditions that would help to contribute to the development of a smoke ring. Slow cooking and smoking over several hours. This allows time for the NO2 to be absorbed into and interact with the meat pigment.

Maintain the surface of the meat moist during smoking. NO2 is water-soluble so it absorbs more readily into a piece of meat that has a moist surface than one which has a dry surface. Meats that have been marinated tend to have a moister surface than non-marinated meats. There are also a couple of ways that you can help to maintain a higher humidity level in your cooker; 1. Do not open and close the cooker frequently. Each time you open it you allow moisture inside to escape. 2. Put a pan of water on your grill. Evaporation from the water will help increase humidity inside the cooker.

Generate smoke from the burning of wood chips or wood logs. Since NO2 is a by-product of incomplete combustion, green wood or wetted wood seems to enhance smoke ring development. Burning green wood or wetted wood also helps to increase the humidity level inside the cooker.
A high temperature flame is needed to create NO2 from nitrogen and oxygen. A smoldering fire without a flame does not produce as much NO2. Consequently, a cooker that uses indirect heat generated from the burning of wood typically will develop a pronounced smoke ring. Have fun cooking. A nice smoke ring can sure make a piece of barbecued meat look attractive.

About the Author:

Joe Cordray is the Meat Extension Spe******t at Iowa State University’s nationally renowned Meat Lab, located in Ames, IA. He has been writing for The BBQer since Fall of 2001
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All that is going on in my smoker!!
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Thanks for sharing Rick!
 
Hmmm..according to this article, wetter IS better. I've been wet smoking almost everything for years (except jerky, of course), not really knowing for sure if there were more benefits other than the meat being a bit more forgiving if slightly overcooked.

Very informative...thanks Rick!

Eric
 
I love a scientific explanation....

All I know is, my 5 gallon wood soaking bucket stays near my smokers.
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Rick
Thanks for taking the time to share that great article with us
Looks like it is time keep the wood moist in the smoker!
 
God bless those Iowa State University guys. It's an engineering and agriculturial school (mainly, but lots of other programs) so maybe when they screw up and kill one of the farm animals they get to smoke it.

Sounds like an Alton Brown article.

Thanks for sharing this. Guess I'll keep that water pan full in the WSM.


One thing I've always wondered...with heavy paprika, cayanne pepper, cherry kool-aid, whatever you're putting in your rubs that have a heavy red color to them...Is it possible that some of this actually "stains" the meat and penetrates enough and therefore helps add to the depth or color of the ring?

Thoughts?

But I will say that the last several chuckies I've done have been rubbed with EVOO and Montreal Steak Seasoning with an overnight rest. With chucks I get a very deep and colorful ring. And the rub has no red in it at all.
 
i am not sure about items you mentioned bleeding through to add to the smoke ring, but I have read that adding tenderquick to your rub is a way to increase the smoke ring.
Not something I would ever do, I try to get the ring by going low and slow.

I have also heard that the use of tenderquick, and other things led the KCBS to not put much weight on the smoke ring when judging.


heres one of the articles I have read:
http://bbq.about.com/od/barbecuehelp/g/gsmokering.htm
 
I feel like alton brown is in the house and bringing all his scienstific stuff with him. Thanks for the break down Rick.
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This subject and the information on it always makes for a good read/discussion. It's been around for a long time, but it's always good to bring it up for review. Thanks for sharing the good information. It's all good my friend.
 
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