Soupy/Supie Sausage

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BGKYSmoker

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Fermented/Dry cured. This is popular in the coal region of North East PA.

Sausages are fermented and dried and then packed in either Olive oil (not evoo) sunflower oil or lard.

I used sunflower oil. 

AKA: Soupy or Supie. This is a Len Poli recipe so i will not post it.

At just about 1 month. 3 more months to go.


 
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I am on the fence... I am going to watch this through, My question is how the sausage ends up? Greasy / Oily? 
 
The Soupies, short for Oil Cured Soppressata, I have had are not what I would call greasy on the inside, not any more than any other type of soppressata or pepperoni. You will need some paper towel for the outside oil. The ingredients and the process, oil aging, is what sets the Soupie apart. They are tasty however it may just be the ones I sampled but, they take some Jawin' to get them down out of hand. Diced they add great flavor to pasta sauces like Pomodoro, Alfredo, Carbonara or even Clam Sauce...JJ
 
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First time I hear about these. What is the purpose of packing in oil? Preservstion? How does it affect the state/texture compared to regular fermented/dried sausage?
 
Casings will be soft. Oil will not penetrate that far into the meat.

They have been fermented and dried in the traditional way. Oil is for preserving which can be for years.

Submerging meats into oil or lard has been done for ages. My dad said they used a barrel of lard for large chunks of meat because they could not afford an ice box or ice.
 
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Casings will be soft. Oil will not penetrate that far into the meat.

They have been fermented and dried in the traditional way. Oil is for preserving which can be for years.

Submerging meats into oil or lard has been done for ages. My dad said they used a barrel of lard for large chunks of meat because they could not afford an ice box or ice.
I do that: a sort of potted pork: meat, cooked sausage, ribs (smoked or not).

I am just surprised to see dried sausage preserved in oil since it's already "preserved" from curing and drying.

Looks very cool. I like the appearance.
 
This looks like the old Italian Sotto Olio presdervation method.  There are Sopressata aficionados all over the country but soupies is a Norteast Pa. slang. 

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Making soupies (Sopressata) is a Norhteast Pa. tradition.   There is a Contest each year in Hazelton to determine the best soupie.

Check out these links

http://www.scordo.com/calabria/homemade-salami-soppressata-soupie.html

Chicago has some excellent Soppresata makers who blog.  This link is a tutorial with recipe

http://ifoodblogger.com/homemade-sopressata.

I have never kept Sopressata around long enough to need special preservation.  I usually gain a couple of pounds every time I get one.
 
 
This looks like the old Italian Sotto Olio presdervation method.  There are Sopressata aficionados all over the country but soupies is a Norteast Pa. slang. 

[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> </w:WordDocument></xml><![endif]

Making soupies (Sopressata) is a Norhteast Pa. tradition.  There is a Contest each year in Hazelton to determine the best soupie.

Check out these links

http://www.scordo.com/calabria/homemade-salami-soppressata-soupie.html

Chicago has some excellent Soppresata makers who blog.  This link is a tutorial with recipe

http://ifoodblogger.com/homemade-sopressata.

I have never kept Sopressata around long enough to need special preservation.  I usually gain a couple of pounds every time I get one.
We lived in Lehighton for 15 years. This style was popular up in the coal region.
 
Looked today and dated.

I gotta try one.

I know what yer thinking, get yer mind outta the gutter 
laugh1.gif


Taste real good. Let the oil drain off some but other than that, these go into the book.




 
Throw the cow over the fence some hay------that sausage makes my day!!!!

Great Job.

Blaise
 
They do look good! He said it was a Len Poli recipe, maybe search for that or Rick will probably be along to help ya out.

Ryan
 
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