Amazon knives for cutting meat ????

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I have a Work Sharp too. I added the Elite Knife Sharpening Solution to it. I really like it and use it for more than just sharpening knives. It's pretty straight forward. If I want a V-edge on any of my knives, I get my buddy to sharpen it with his Tormek T-8.

And for those of you that picked up a set of knives for $14, that's a hell of a deal!
 
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Let's see if I can post this knife steels chart. The 1.4116 steel for the Brevin knives is a decent performer. I've got several inexpensive knives that perform as well at home as my pricier German steel ones l.

Eversharpe_Steel_Characteristics_graph_grande.jpg
 
Given the above discussion, here is a review of knife sharpeners. Guys YouTube channel is ProjectFarm, for those that know him. Really good guy for tool reviews.


That was an excellent video! Thanks for posting it.
 
Given the above discussion, here is a review of knife sharpeners. Guys YouTube channel is ProjectFarm, for those that know him. Really good guy for tool reviews.



I really enjoy that guy's videos. All his quality and performance comparisons are well thought out and completely unbiased. I've bought a product or 2 based on his videos.

Red
 
At some point I think I'll get the Worksharp. Would love to find a deal on the Pro. The Worksharp seems to be the sweet spot for cost to benefit and ease of use. I have the Ken Onion Worksharp belt system but it's very hard to use for a lefty. Basically new in box other than one use. Think I'll throw it on FB market place and use that money towards the stone system.
 
For the price, value, durability, and edge retention, you can't go wrong with Victorinox or Mercer, and both are available on Amazon.

A knife is only half the story, though. The other half is a steel and a stone or diamond or belt sharpening system. Most of the factory edges can be maintained for about 6 months to a year with household use from the steel alone. Once they go dull though, you need a sharpening system to restore the edge. Research sharpening system comparisons on YouTube to get an idea what might work for you.

I use stones, which aren't for the beginner unless you have time and patience to learn. My kids got rolling sharpeners for Xmas. One got a Horl (German) and the other a Work Sharp (US). Avoid the cheaper Tumbler and other knockoffs.
I completely agree. While we have some very nice knifes in our house. I use mostly NSF standard butcher knifes that you get at Restaurant Depot. It is all in how you maintain the blades. I personally use the Work Sharp and you can shave with my knives. The only exception is for trimming silver skin and small pockets of fat. I use a Bubba fillet knife.

Jason
 
My advice: steer CLEAR of expensive knives. They're great for people who love knives, but they are inferior in every way to brands like Victorinox and Mundial. Go into a restaurant kitchen, and you'll see brands like Victorinox and Mundial everywhere.

I don't mind spending $200 on a carry knife, but I am all done with expensive cooking knives. They're like sick babies. They have to be pampered and protected. Put them in the dishwasher, and big chips come out.

I was stupid enough to buy some Shuns when Alton Brown was shilling for Kershaw. He starred in videos, showing how he wuvved hand-washing his wonderful Shuns. Then he and Kershaw parted ways, and suddenly, he got a revelation: another company that paid him made better knives! What a coincidence.

Kershaw advertised Shuns as dishwasher-safe. I put one in the dishwasher, and pieces fell off the blade. I complained to Shun, and suddenly, their ad copy changed. What a coincidence.

Shuns were advertised as having Damascus steel. Hello? There is no such thing as stainless Damascus. Kershaw just stamps swirly lines on Shun blades.

I gave my Shuns away to someone who has no common sense. She has no idea how to sharpen a knife, so she uses them until they get dull and then ships them off and pays big money for sharpening.

I keep diamond hones handy. Takes 10 seconds to put a great edge on a cheap stainless knife. The NSF handles require no maintenance, and you can get them in different colors for different things. Color-coding is not fun when each knife costs $250.

I got a fantastic Chinese meat cleaver from the Wok Shop. Takes a fantastic edge easily, and it's indestructible. I think I paid $15. I also bought their $10 vegetable cleaver. It takes an edge so sharp you can fold a paper towel double and wave the cleaver through it, all the way. Wok Shop knives rust, though, so you have to wash them by hand.

I have a stainless Victorinox vegetable cleaver and a Mundial meat cleaver that don't seem to sharpen as well, but they don't require special care, either.

Be a meat smoker, not a cork sniffer.
 
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I use cheap NSF knives from places like restaurant depot. That is what I grew up with working in the butcher shop, but we kept them sharp. I do have a some exceptions to that:
1- Fine Trimming, I use a Bubba Fillet Knife.
2- Fish, See above
3- Slicing, I have 2 Wusthof slicing knifes (more for presentation than anything)
4- Bread, we like our Wustof bread knife
5- Chopping, I got my wife a custom Damascus knife that she loves

- Jason
 
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I love my pricey pocket and sheath knives, but someone ruined my day by turning me on to disposable scalpel knives for boning game. A cheap plastic Chinese scalpel holder is actually much better than a beautiful Benchmade for this purpose. Horrible thought.

For boning turkeys, I use Forschner birds beak knives. Five dollars each.
 
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Cheapest sharpening system available?

Water sandpapers taped around 1 1/4" PVC. That's what I use on reverse curve knives because I don't have a belt system and those knives are a pain to sharpen on stones. I use them like steels from rough grit to fine. Works like a frigging charm.
 
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Shuns were advertised as having Damascus steel. Hello? There is no such thing as stainless Damascus. Kershaw just stamps swirly lines on Shun blades.

They are still advertised as having Damascus steel.

Shun’s Damascus is formed by layering different types of metal alloys together, then forging them into a single piece. The process and the different characteristics of the layered metals create the rippling patterns you see on the blade. The number of layers can vary; many Shun knives, for example, have 34 layers of metal on each side of a high-performance VG-MAX cutting core.


Stainless steel Damascus does exist.

Stainless damascus of course has the benefit of being stain resistant. Making stainless damascus offers many difficulties over producing carbon steel damascus. Carbon steel damascus is much more commonly produced.


Zwilling also offers their Bob Kramer Euroline Stainless Damascus Steel Knives though they are more than a touch out of my price range which is ok, since they're not something I'd be interested in anyways.

At the end of the day, as long as its sharp and cuts I'm ok with using it.
 
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My advice: steer CLEAR of expensive knives. They're great for people who love knives, but they are inferior in every way to brands like Victorinox and Mundial. Go into a restaurant kitchen, and you'll see brands like Victorinox and Mundial everywhere.
I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with you on this one. I have a very good set of Wusthofs that were not cheap. Are they better than the brands you mentioned? Maybe not. Are they inferior? Sorry, but NO! I will hold my knifes up against anything out there. I also treat them extremely well. I swipe them across a steel before every use, and hand wash them only. I would guess the reason you see those brands in restaurant kitchens is because they get the job done, and are cheaper to replace when they are abused by people that didn't pay for them. At the shop where I work, they supply Craftsman tools for the workers because they are inexpensive and get abused, or lost by people that didn't have to write a check to use them. At my garage at home, Snap On all day long. There is no way I'm letting a rookie get close to those.
 
Thanks for the correction. When I said there was no such thing as stainless Damascus, I was relying on information I got from knife nerds a long time ago. I didn't know people had come up with ways of doing it. That being said, Shun knives are not ordinary Damascus. They are stainless cores with a few layers of different stainless welded on for show. Ordinarily, Damascus is folded all the way through. Shuns have some kind of weird marriage of san mai and factory-welded layers of stainless which serve no purpose except to look nice. They could have gone with straight san mai and saved everyone money.

It's a marketing gimmick. It doesn't make the knives better. They are extremely fragile. They are harder than most knives, but this is pointless and counterproductive because in order to make them hard, Kershaw has to make them very brittle.

Anyone can make an extremely hard, brittle knife. I could make one tomorrow afternoon.

Most companies deliberately avoid making super-hard knives because they don't want their customers to send back broken blades. A 58 RC knife that can take normal use and even some abuse is far superior to a 61 RC knife you have to keep in an incubator.

I can drop my stamped $18 knives on the floor, put them in the dishwasher, and throw them in a drawer piled on top of each other. They will never chip, and they will still cut like razors after a few passes over a cheap hone I inherited from my mother in 1997.

Real Damascus, whatever pedants may decide that is, is also a gimmick. I know people don't like hearing that. It's a backward technology that can't compete with modern steels. It doesn't make the best knives. Just the prettiest and most expensive.

I spent $80 on a Shun santoku, and they are now going for more than twice that. It had a slippery, uncomfortable handle. Pieces fell out of the edge. I had to be careful how I stored it. It was a really stupid buy, so I got rid of it and took a 100% loss.

I had a Shun vegetable cleaver. The balance was terrible. The blade shape was no good for anything. It was too heavy for vegetables and too light for meat. I never used it.

I have a big, expensive cleaver made by some other Japanese factory. I'll bet a new one costs $400 now. Useless. I can't put it in the dishwasher. The handle is wooden, so it will never be as clean or durable as plastic. Even though it has a heavy, cumbersome blade, I can't use it on meat because bones will break the wimpy super-hard edge. I wrapped it in newspapers when I moved 6 years ago, and it is still wrapped, because it's worthless. I have no idea what to do with it. I should take it to Goodwill.

If there is a possibility I can dissuade other people from doing stupid things I've done with my money, I'll certainly try. I hate to see anyone conned by dubious characters like Alton Brown. My cheap knives have been a joy to me. Zero problems. Zero, zero, zero. I have maybe $150 in the whole bunch. That's less than the price of one snob knife.
 
I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with you on this one. I have a very good set of Wusthofs that were not cheap. Are they better than the brands you mentioned? Maybe not. Are they inferior? Sorry, but NO! I will hold my knifes up against anything out there. I also treat them extremely well. I swipe them across a steel before every use, and hand wash them only. I would guess the reason you see those brands in restaurant kitchens is because they get the job done, and are cheaper to replace when they are abused by people that didn't pay for them. At the shop where I work, they supply Craftsman tools for the workers because they are inexpensive and get abused, or lost by people that didn't have to write a check to use them. At my garage at home, Snap On all day long. There is no way I'm letting a rookie get close to those.
and they are less likely to find their way to the staffs home kitchens 😎
 
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