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Apparently, I need a new circuit breaker....

SonnyE

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Yesterday I was making Dutch's Wicked Beans, and the Mrs. was microwaving something when the MES heating element came on.
Yep, Boink! There goes the darn CB out back. :mad:

Just a word to the wise, Guys (and Gals!). The more a CB trips, the weaker it can get.
So if you have one that becomes a pain in the butt, replace it with a new one, and a "slow blow" one so it will hold better.
Do not exceed the currant rating of the circuits wire size.

My pot of Beans in the smoker were at 168°, so I pulled them as done.
And I ate two bowls of them, they were Sooo Good!

I've been a bit of a "fartin Martin" last night and today. But it just reminds me how good Dutch's beans are.

The Wife even liked them. :confused::eek::)
(A sure sign I used too small an amount of Jalapenos. :( )
 

Ben58

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You are right about those breakers. If you have a GFCI outlet, they suffer the same fate over time. Whether you are pressing the test button or they trip due to moisture, they wear out as well.
 

dward51

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Actually the breaker is doing it's job.

With the MES and a powerful microwave on at the same time, you are apparently exceeding the rated amperage of the wiring that breaker is protecting. Whatever you do, don't be tempted to put in a larger rated breaker. A wire is rated for a specific amperage level and over that level you risk overheating, burnt wiring nd a fire. Best solution is to add a dedicated breaker and wire a dedicated outlet for the smoker.
 

SonnyE

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Actually the breaker is doing it's job.

With the MES and a powerful microwave on at the same time, you are apparently exceeding the rated amperage of the wiring that breaker is protecting. Whatever you do, don't be tempted to put in a larger rated breaker. A wire is rated for a specific amperage level and over that level you risk overheating, burnt wiring nd a fire. Best solution is to add a dedicated breaker and wire a dedicated outlet for the smoker.
Never implied putting in a larger breaker, Dave.
Just one rated for motor starting duty.
Lets the breaker deal with the inrush current of a pure resistance, or motor starting load on an otherwise semi loaded circuit.
But I know for a fact that older breakers get weaker and weaker as they get tripped.
Often tripping down near 2/3rds rated new capacity.
The circuit is number 12 wire (20 amps), and the CB is 15 amps.
Doesn't happen often around here. But may be time to address the situation.
Maybe add a dedicated circuit to the "outdoor kitchen"....
 

SonnyE

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You are right about those breakers. If you have a GFCI outlet, they suffer the same fate over time. Whether you are pressing the test button or they trip due to moisture, they wear out as well.
Yeah, Ben. Any electrical safety device gets weaker at each trip.
Then they become a nuisance tripper.
Which is where I believe this old booger is at.
 

chopsaw

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Yeah, Ben. Any electrical safety device gets weaker at each trip.
Then they become a nuisance tripper.
Which is where I believe this old booger is at.
Gets to the point it won't even reset with no load or fault issue .
 

Steve H

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If there is no wire smaller then the 12 ga on the circuit. Then you can replace the 15 amp breaker with a 20 amp breaker. Personally I never use anything smaller then 12 ga wire to avoid confusion.
 

SonnyE

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If there is no wire smaller then the 12 ga on the circuit. Then you can replace the 15 amp breaker with a 20 amp breaker. Personally I never use anything smaller then 12 ga wire to avoid confusion.
Same here Steve. My one exception is lighting circuits, I will use #14 for those.
But this home was built in the Mid-1960's, and has the zones divided accordingly.
While I have worked on house wiring, my forte is industrial/utility.
And I hate old house wiring. No schematics, too often half-ass changes by incompetent previous owners or G.C.'s.
Typically the Microwave is to have it's own dedicated circuit.

My thoughts are on a revamp of my outdoor "kitchen" today. :rolleyes: Starting with a roof after last nights thunder showers here...
The trucks are washed anyway...;)
 

Steve H

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Same here Steve. My one exception is lighting circuits, I will use #14 for those.
But this home was built in the Mid-1960's, and has the zones divided accordingly.
While I have worked on house wiring, my forte is industrial/utility.
And I hate old house wiring. No schematics, too often half-ass changes by incompetent previous owners or G.C.'s.
Typically the Microwave is to have it's own dedicated circuit.

My thoughts are on a revamp of my outdoor "kitchen" today. :rolleyes: Starting with a roof after last nights thunder showers here...
The trucks are washed anyway...;)
I know the pain. I'm a industrial sparky as well. But used to do work on others homes. The stuff I've seen is really a wonder.
 
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