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Venison Jerky and Instacure#2?

frankieg3

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I just took my first foray into charcuterie and packed 13 venison salami yesterday using 1 tbs Instacure#2 to 5 lbs ground venison/smoked bacon tips/pork backfat/ country pork rib....Tonight I mixed up 7.5 ground venison to soak overnight in a jerky marinade. I used 1.5 tbs Instacure#2 but realize this is for a long cure like my salami. If my plan is to put the jerky strips in a dehydrator can I still use the Instacure#2 and eat it or will this pose a health risk with the added nitrates?(I should have Prague Powder#1) Worried I just wasted 7.5lbs of ground but would rather do that than risk a health issue. Sorry odd first post but thought you all might know. 

Thanks, 

Frank
 

frankieg3

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Okay. Again, being new to this, I used pre-ground meat to make this batch whereas the other batch of salami I used steaks that I cubed and ground, I had read that you should not use pre-ground meat to make salami. Is this accurate?

Thanks (again!), 

Frank
 

SFLsmkr1

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I just took my first foray into charcuterie and packed 13 venison salami yesterday using 1 tbs Instacure#2 to 5 lbs ground venison/smoked bacon tips/pork backfat/ country pork rib....Tonight I mixed up 7.5 ground venison to soak overnight in a jerky marinade. I used 1.5 tbs Instacure#2 but realize this is for a long cure like my salami. If my plan is to put the jerky strips in a dehydrator can I still use the Instacure#2 and eat it or will this pose a health risk with the added nitrates?(I should have Prague Powder#1) Worried I just wasted 7.5lbs of ground but would rather do that than risk a health issue. Sorry odd first post but thought you all might know. 

Thanks, 

Frank
Here is some cure info for you.

CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in the low temperature environment of smoked meats.

Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate.

The primary and most important reason to use cures is to prevent BOTULISM POISONING (Food poisoning). It is very important that any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature be cured. To trigger botulism poisoning, the requirements are quite simple - lack of oxygen, the presence of moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140° F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminates the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 185° F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don't use cures. There are two types of commercially used cures.

Prague Powder #1

Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure. Cures are used to prevent meats from spoiling when being cooked or smoked at low temperatures (under 200 degrees F). This cure is 1 part sodium nitrite (6.25%) and 16 parts salt (93.75%) and are combined and crystallized to assure even distribution. As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to ‘gas out’ at about 130 degrees F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20% of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. 4 ounces of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 100 lbs of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 level tsp per 5 lbs of meat. Mix with cold water, then mix into meat like you would mix seasonings into meat.

Prague Powder #2

Used to dry-cure products. Prague powder #2 is a mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, .64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt. (1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt.) It is primarily used in dry-curing Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowly breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly. Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat when mixing with meat. When using a cure in a brine solution, follow a recipe.
 

petewoody

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By "tbs" do you mean Tablespoons or teaspoons. If the former, you have used three times as much cure as required. Usually the terms are expressed as TBS and tsp.
 

frankieg3

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Joined Dec 12, 2016
I used 1.5 teaspoons for this mix. Is it salvageable as jerky or, as a poster above mentioned, is this best turned into salami? My only concern there is that I used pre-ground venison for what I had hoped to be jerky. I had read prior to my first salami attempt to only use cubed venison meat (not already ground). 
 

SFLsmkr1

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Maybe if you can try to post pics and your process so folks dont guess on what your doing.

I use venison and elk ground for dry cure salami and have used it for ground game jerky. The 2 processes are different as ground jerky does not need much liquid.

Normally cure #1 is used in jerky as its slightly smoked or dehydrated. Both cures used at 1 level tsp per every 5lbs of meat. I dont do many brine liquids so i cant help you on that one.
 

frankieg3

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Sure. I used this recipe but adjusted for 7.5lbs with the other ingredients excepting the curing agent which I thought was 1 teaspoon per 5 lbs per directions on the packet- so only 1.5 teaspoons total. I substituted 1 tablespoon of garlic powder for the minced garlic. I mixed all of the ingredients by hand with food gloves on. 

Once I had all the ingredients well mixed, it has been sitting in a plastic bin overnight refrigerated. I am either going to cool it further and put it through the jerky gun or add some pork/pork fat, dextrose & bactoferm and turn it into salami. I am thinking with the added liquid in this recipe this would not be a good candidate for salami or it would take forever and a day to dry

but would defer to other's expertise. 

Pic of finished product is below. 
[h4]Hawaiian Style Jerky[/h4]
5 pounds ground venison
5 teaspoons canning salt
1 1/2 teaspoons Tender Quick[emoji]174[/emoji] curing mix
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice
1/2 cup teriyaki sauce
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium white onion, minced
1 tablespoon black pepper
 

andy riley

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Joined Nov 11, 2013
Frank, I like the sound of the Hawaiian style jerky. Where did the recipe come from? I don't do a lot of jerky, and usually use "kits" when I do. So it seems to have a bit too much liquid to my way of thinking. I'd like to make this, but feel I should cut down the juice and teriyaki sauce amounts a tad. Ideas?
 

dirtsailor2003

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Sure. I used this recipe but adjusted for 7.5lbs with the other ingredients excepting the curing agent which I thought was 1 teaspoon per 5 lbs per directions on the packet- so only 1.5 teaspoons total. I substituted 1 tablespoon of garlic powder for the minced garlic. I mixed all of the ingredients by hand with food gloves on. 

Once I had all the ingredients well mixed, it has been sitting in a plastic bin overnight refrigerated. I am either going to cool it further and put it through the jerky gun or add some pork/pork fat, dextrose & bactoferm and turn it into salami. I am thinking with the added liquid in this recipe this would not be a good candidate for salami or it would take forever and a day to dry

but would defer to other's expertise. 

Pic of finished product is below. 
[h4]Hawaiian Style Jerky[/h4]
5 pounds ground venison
5 teaspoons canning salt
1 1/2 teaspoons Tender Quick[emoji]174[/emoji] curing mix
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice
1/2 cup teriyaki sauce
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium white onion, minced
1 tablespoon black pepper
With the TQ, salt, and teriyaki this sounds like a sodium overload.
 

dirtsailor2003

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OTBS Member
21,606
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Joined Oct 4, 2012
 
Sure. I used this recipe but adjusted for 7.5lbs with the other ingredients excepting the curing agent which I thought was 1 teaspoon per 5 lbs per directions on the packet- so only 1.5 teaspoons total. I substituted 1 tablespoon of garlic powder for the minced garlic. I mixed all of the ingredients by hand with food gloves on. 

Once I had all the ingredients well mixed, it has been sitting in a plastic bin overnight refrigerated. I am either going to cool it further and put it through the jerky gun or add some pork/pork fat, dextrose & bactoferm and turn it into salami. I am thinking with the added liquid in this recipe this would not be a good candidate for salami or it would take forever and a day to dry

but would defer to other's expertise. 

Pic of finished product is below. 
[h4]Hawaiian Style Jerky[/h4]
5 pounds ground venison
5 teaspoons canning salt
1 1/2 teaspoons Tender Quick[emoji]174[/emoji] curing mix
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice
1/2 cup teriyaki sauce
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium white onion, minced
1 tablespoon black pepper
With the TQ, salt, and teriyaki this sounds like a sodium overload.
 

andy riley

Fire Starter
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Joined Nov 11, 2013
Now that DirtSailor mentioned it, it does look like way too much salt. My wife liked the idea of a Hawaiian style jerky and so I'm going to try it.

I'll cut out the canning salt altogether, use cure #1 instead of tender quick, and cut down a little on the liquid.

I'll try a 1lb batch 1st to see how it goes.
 

frankieg3

Newbie
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10
Joined Dec 12, 2016
Based on above comment of "too salty"  I just mixed up a batch and scaled back to 5 lbs venison, 1t prague#1, 2t kosher salt, 1t crushed red pepper, 1/4c terriyaki, 1/2c pineapple, then 1T pepper, garlic powder and onion powder. Will report back on results. 
 

dirtsailor2003

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Joined Oct 4, 2012
When using cure #1 you have more leeway for adding salt. TQ already contains a bunch.

Other ingredients such as soy sauce, teriyaki, fish sauce all contain sodium.

So when using those I'd recommend mixing those in first. Do a fry sample and see how salty the mix is. Adjust and add more if needed.
 

frankieg3

Newbie
20
10
Joined Dec 12, 2016

This is from the recipe above. It came out fantastic. I did cut back to 1C pineapple juice and used 1T garlic powder, 1T onion Powder, and 1 T crushed red pepper. For the second batch I added IT habanero sauce and it has a nice bite. Heading for the vacuum sealer tomorrow. 

Frank
 

frankieg3

Newbie
20
10
Joined Dec 12, 2016

This is from the recipe above. It came out fantastic. I did cut back to 1C pineapple juice and used 1T garlic powder, 1T onion Powder, and 1 T crushed red pepper. For the second batch I added IT habanero sauce and it has a nice bite. Heading for the vacuum sealer tomorrow. 

Frank
 
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