store bought BBB mix for brine country style pork.

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migraine

Smoke Blower
Original poster
Aug 4, 2011
135
20
Sacramento, California
First try to make bacon...
I have some HighMountain Buck Board Bacon cure that I want to try to make into a brine for some boneless country style rib meat. I tried calling the company but no one answers...
The packaging says to use as a dry rub(it contains 0.7% curing agent) with the included mix of spices and salt. One packet does 8.33 pound of pork dry rubbed
I have 4.3lbs of approx 2" thick/wide boneless rib meat and if I add 4 pounds of water for a wet cure, does that make the cure safe and not over/under salt/sugar/spice flavor?
I plan on 2"x4 days+2 days to cure, so 10 days curing...is that still correct?
Also, I would like a med-medheavy smoke flavor. How long should I smoke the ribs for and what temp, while keeping me in the safe zone?
I have an electric, PID controlled analog Master built with a mailbox A-Maze-N pellet tray. My Treager is out of the question...
Oh do I miss A-Maze-N pellets and finding 100% true-flavor wood pellets in NorCal.
Thank you in advance, Brian
 
Oh do I miss A-Maze-N pellets and finding 100% true-flavor wood pellets in NorCal.
Thank you in advance, Brian

A MAZE N pellets are still available... I see them in the big box stores...
But here is where I order from as they seem to be the cheapest ... I believe free shipping with a certain amount...

 
Yup, mix one packet with your 4.33 pounds meat and 4 pounds water. 10 days would be my minimum time but it will work, the salt and such should be just fine this way. Looking forward to your results. thirdeye thirdeye will probably have more insight on the Hi-mountain seasoning for final flavor, but you original plan looks good to me.
 
The packaging says to use as a dry rub(it contains 0.7% curing agent) with the included mix of spices and salt. One packet does 8.33 pound of pork dry rubbed

I have 4.3lbs of approx 2" thick/wide boneless rib meat and if I add 4 pounds of water for a wet cure, does that make the cure safe and not over/under salt/sugar/spice flavor?

This is an interesting question, and although the Hi Mountain products were wildly popular on three other BBQ forums... I believe it's the first time that I have seen this discussed. Now, the Hi Mountain BBB cure was designed and tested as a dry cure, but it seems logical that it could be used as a curing brine as long as the "weight in the bucket" is equal to 8.33 pounds.

If you had a 4.3 pound loin or butt roast, the question of uptake might be open for discussion. Is your boneless rib meat in fact country ribs cut from the pork butt?

Over many years of use, one complaint that some users of BBB cure have, is the saltiness of the finished product. Unless Hi Mountain has changed their directions, there is no mention of a soak-out step, and a resting period prior to smoking. The suggested soak-out range of time can be from 2 to 8 hours, followed by an overnight rest. I suppose you could mix up your curing brine and do a taste test before adding the meat. For a control, how about mixing up a pint of 2% salt water and taste that. Or how about test cooking some of the meat at the end of your brining cycle, also being mindful of the saltiness?

EDIT - I completely forgot about Dizzy Pig SugarBush Bacon, here is a link to that method.

 
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Over many years of use, one complaint that some users of BBB cure have, is the saltiness of the finished product. Unless Hi Mountain has changed their directions, there is no mention of a soak-out step, and a resting period prior to smoking. The suggested soak-out range of time can be from 2 to 8 hours, followed by an overnight rest. I suppose you could mix up your curing brine and do a taste test before adding the meat. For a control, how about mixing up a pint of 2% salt water and taste that. Or how about test cooking some of the meat at the end of your brining cycle, also being mindful of the saltiness?
That was my problem with Hi-Mountain BBB cure, as well. In fact, almost all of their products are very salty to my taste. (And I'm no low-sodium fanatic.)
I think I used it as a dry cure, so maybe going wet and/or soaking afterward might mitigate this problem.
 
Why not use it as a dry cure since that is why it was created? If wanting a wet brine do a search here for the several version's of "Pop's Brine" As cheap as cure #1 is, and the High Mtn packets are I don't think I would be trying a Frankenstein creation with either. Use one proven method.
 
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This is an interesting question, and although the Hi Mountain products were wildly popular on three other BBQ forums... I believe it's the first time that I have seen this discussed. Now, the Hi Mountain BBB cure was designed and tested as a dry cure, but it seems logical that it could be used as a curing brine as long as the "weight in the bucket" is equal to 8.33 pounds.

If you had a 4.3 pound loin or butt roast, the question of uptake might be open for discussion. Is your boneless rib meat in fact country ribs cut from the pork butt?

Over many years of use, one complaint that some users of BBB cure have, is the saltiness of the finished product. Unless Hi Mountain has changed their directions, there is no mention of a soak-out step, and a resting period prior to smoking. The suggested soak-out range of time can be from 2 to 8 hours, followed by an overnight rest. I suppose you could mix up your curing brine and do a taste test before adding the meat. For a control, how about mixing up a pint of 2% salt water and taste that. Or how about test cooking some of the meat at the end of your brining cycle, also being mindful of the saltiness?

EDIT - I completely forgot about Dizzy Pig SugarBush Bacon, here is a link to that method.

I'll answer most reply posts to me here. I've had this product for a while and figured...why not use it up and the amount of meat/cost is negligible for a first time. I considered doing a dry rub but wanted to make sure It was safely coated so wet brining seemed to be the simplest solution(pun not intended). I'll add a day+ to the original planned time of 10 days and once cured, I'll fry a taste test and soak to remove saltiness if needed before smoking/cooking. If this goes well, I'll looking to do a shoulder(BBB) or a slab. I went this meat because the slabs at Costco were dismal, at best and I have no room for large packages of meat in the refer/freezer. IF I want more smoke, can I lower the cook temp or just smoke longer without harming the meat/safe zone? Thanks everyone, Brian
 
If you mix up your own equilibrium brine, the meat will never be over or under salty. Just a thought. This allows You to control the salt and sugar.
 
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If you mix up your own equilibrium brine, the meat will never be over or under salty. Just a thought. This allows You to control the salt and sugar.
What he said. Your end product can't be any saltier than what you put in. The meat can't take in more salt than what is in the brine as salt seeks equilibrium between areas of salt and areas of no salt. It balances itself, in other words.
 
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That was my problem with Hi-Mountain BBB cure, as well. In fact, almost all of their products are very salty to my taste. (And I'm no low-sodium fanatic.)
I think I used it as a dry cure, so maybe going wet and/or soaking afterward might mitigate this problem.
Soaking will definitely take care of the problem. Soaking times can be from 2 to 24 hours. Dry and rest overnight in the fridge.

A little history here.... About 20 years ago, Hi Mountain BBB was becoming popular on several BBQ forums, I belonged to. I had been curing meat for 20 or so years prior to that, Hi Mountain is a Wyoming product, so I started experimenting with it. And not just on butts, but also loins and chops. Here is a photo from 2006 of some BBB cured loins:
FNQMohq.jpg

I called the company one day and visited with someone in the product department with some suggestions on improving the BBB instructions, and to report my success with loins and chops. The instructions never changed to my knowledge.
IF I want more smoke, can I lower the cook temp or just smoke longer without harming the meat/safe zone?
I've never cold smoked any meats that were cured with HM cure. BBB cure is 0.7% nitrite in a salt/seasoning carrier. Maybe SmokinEdge SmokinEdge or some of the other curing mathematicians on the site can jump in with some help.
 
Thirdeye, maybe you could give them some tips for their salmon cure. That was so salty, I had to toss the finished product.
 
I've never cold smoked any meats that were cured with HM cure. BBB cure is 0.7% nitrite in a salt/seasoning carrier. Maybe SmokinEdge SmokinEdge or some of the other curing mathematicians on the site can jump in with some help.
I need the total amount of weight of the mix being applied and total weight of meat/water.
 
packaging says to use as a dry rub(it contains 0.7% curing agent) with the included mix of spices and salt. One packet does 8.33 pound of pork dry rubbed
Just something I noticed. This is a very odd pound number for a cure packet. Its not even in pounds and is equal to 3781.82 grams or 3.78 Kg again not an even number. It is curiously the correct weight for 1 gallon water though, (8.33 lbs).

Not doubting you migraine migraine , but if you could post a picture of their instructions it’s usually a simple one page sheet, and weigh the cure packet in grams. Then I can tell you the ppm nitrite, unfortunately unless I know the salt weight I cannot calculate the percentage.
 
thirdeye thirdeye , here is some long math for your interest. I have a few HM sausage kits and have used them for a lot of years. They all have two 4.2oz (119g) cure packets that contain .85% nitrite. Each packet will cure 15# sausage ( 6810g)

SOLVE FOR NITRITE PPM:

119 x .0085= 1.0 multiply that by 1M so 1.0 x 1000000= 1000000 divide that by the meat weight. 1000000/6810= 146.8 ppm nitrite. I have no idea the salt percentage as I don’t know the total weight.

My guess is that the BBB cure will run real close to 120ppm nitrite just because of USDA guidelines on bacon. But that’s a guess until I get some weights to work with.
 
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The packaging says to use as a dry rub(it contains 0.7% curing agent) with the included mix of spices and salt. One packet does 8.33 pound of pork dry rubbed
My notes confirm that one packet cures 8.33 pounds of pork. Did your BBB kit come with the same instructions I linked below?
Just something I noticed. This is a very odd pound number for a cure packet. Its not even in pounds and is equal to 3781.82 grams or 3.78 Kg again not an even number. It is curiously the correct weight for 1 gallon water though, (8.33 lbs).
I should have recalled that HM products use volumetric measurements. Chalk it up to long term memory loss. Here is a link to their BBB instructions, and low and behold... they mention a 1-2 hours of soaking. And more importantly the measurement of the curing mix is 1-tablespoon + 1-1/4 teaspoon of cure per pound.
here is some long math for your interest. I have a few HM sausage kits and have used them for a lot of years. They all have two 4.2oz (119g) cure packets that contain .85% nitrite. Each packet will cure 15# sausage ( 6810g)
Thanks for the calcs. How do you rate the saltiness of the HM sausage seasonings?
 
I should have recalled that HM products use volumetric measurements. Chalk it up to long term memory loss. Here is a link to their BBB instructions, and low and behold... they mention a 1-2 hours of soaking. And more importantly the measurement of the curing mix is 1-tablespoon + 1-1/4 teaspoon of cure per pound.
https://store-4fsmn3bxeo.mybigcommerce.com/content/pdfs/Hi Mountain Buckboard Bacon Cure.pdf
According to those instructions we apply 16oz. Of cure to 25# meat. So if the cure contains .7% nitrite we can do the calculation for ppm, I was a little surprised.

16oz. = 453.6 grams cure
25# = 11350 grams meat.

SOLVE FOR NITRITE PERCENTAGE:

453.6 x .007= 3.17 x 1000000= 3170000 / 11350= 279.7 ppm nitrite.

Im assuming they are allowing for the loss of cure, but that’s still way high on nitrite.
 
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