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How to make Chorizo?

pugsbrew

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OK, I did a search, and I'm not finding a recipe I want. I know there are a plethora of recipes, but I need something like the chorizo you get in the Mexican restaurants.

You know, spicy and greasy. Maybe this isn't traditional, but I want somewhere to start.

Can you post a link to a good recipe? All pork and venison.

Thanks
 

chopsaw

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google Len Poli . I was just lookin at the chorizo formulas . Alot of different recipes depending on the culture .
 

bassman

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Chorizo Sausage


6 pounds boneless pork shoulder, 15-20% fat content

12 tablespoons ground dried mild Red chile

2 teaspoon of crushed hot chile tepin pepper

2 tablespoons garlic powder

3 tablespoons dried Mexican oregano leaves, ground up

1 tablespoon ground black pepper

2 tablespoons crushed red peppers

2 tablespoons ground Cumin

3 tablespoons fine salt

1/2 cup ice water

1/2 cup cider vinegar
 

chef jimmyj

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Sounds good. Use 100% pure ground Chile. Ancho, Mulado, Cascabel and Chile California are mild. Pascilla and Guajillo have a little more bite. Do not use Chili Powder from the grocery store. This, like Curry Powder, is a convenience blend that contains a few different herbs and spices. You can use dry Marjoram in place of Mexican Oregano, which is milder than Italian or Greek Oregano thatjs common in stores...JJ
 

SmokinAl

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I get mine already mixed up from TheSausageMaker. Just add the meat & we really like the flavor.
Al
 

dls1

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Below is a chorizo recipe I've used numerous times with excellent results. It's a fairly authentic recipe but called Oaxacan-"Style" only because of the chiles used. Traditional Oaxacan chorizo call for chiles that are indigenous to the area and not found elsewhere in Mexico, much less the U.S. There are a few importers in the U.S. that offer the traditional chiles, but at prices that run $10-$20 an ounce. The chiles called for in this recipe are ones that are readily available and most closely approximate the traditional ones. Also note that this is a "Base" recipe calling only for 1 lb. of meat. It's proportionally scalable up and I never make less than 5 lbs. when preparing it.

You'll want about 2 1/2 oz of whole dried chiles (anchos, guajillo, chipotle or another mixure of fairly mild to medium warm chiles). If using ground chiles only (not recommended), substitute with about 1 1/2 oz. Keep the meat very cold at all times to improve the grinding and stuffing process.

Oxacan-Style Chorizo

6-7 ounces pork belly
9-10 ounces pork shoulder
2 or 3 medium ancho chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 to 2 guajillo chiles, seeded and stemmed
1 to 2 dried chipotle chiles, seeded and stemmed
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
2 whole cloves
1/2 inch cinnamon stick (preferably canela)
3/4 teaspoon Mexican oregano or marjoram
1/4 teaspoon thyme
generous pinch ground nutmeg
2 teaspoons smoked paprika (Spanish Pimenton de La Vera preferred)
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
2 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt (Mortons. If using Diamond Crystal kosher salt use 3 teaspoons)
1 garlic clove, whole
1 garlic clove, minced
1/3 cup cider vinegar
water for soaking chiles
Hog casings
Kitchen twine

Cut the pork belly and shoulder into finger shaped pieces 2 to 3 inches long (remove any tough or stringy gristle). Coarsely grind the meat with a meat grinder. Place into the refrigerator to chill while you prepare the seasonings.

Tear the chiles into large, flat pieces. In a hot, dry pan, quickly toast the chiles a few pieces at a time, just until they start to change color and/or blister. This will only take a few seconds - do not overcook or burn. Place the toasted chiles into a bowl, cover with hot water and soak until softened, about 20 minutes.

Place the peppercorns, cloves, cinnamon, oregano and thyme into a spice grinder and grind finely. If you do not have a spice grinder, add these to the blender in the next step, but run it much longer.

Drain the chiles (reserving the liquid) and place into a blender along with the ground spice mixture, the nutmeg, paprika, cayenne, salt, and 1 garlic clove. Add the vinegar and 5 tablespoons of the reserved chile soaking liquid, then blend until smooth.

Using a large spoon, thoroughly mix the seasoning and minced garlic into the ground meats. It will be quite loose. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Prepare hog casings for stuffing by soaking in warm water at least 30 minutes. Change the soaking water and run fresh water through them to remove traces of salt. Stuff the meat into the casings, but leave each piece of casing unstuffed at least 6 inches at each end. Keep the long sausage link quite loose rather than densely packed (if too tight, the casing may burst while creating the small links). Starting in the center and working toward the ends, use kitchen twine to tie the sausage into short, tight rounds the size of a golf ball.

Hang the links in a cool airy place (50-60 degrees) for 36-48 hours or until they have firmed up and are dry to the touch. Be sure to put a baking tray lined with paper towels underneath the sausage to catch the drips. Cut the finished sausage into shorter sets of links, then wrap in plastic and refrigerate or freeze until ready to use.
 

tallbm

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OK, I did a search, and I'm not finding a recipe I want. I know there are a plethora of recipes, but I need something like the chorizo you get in the Mexican restaurants.

You know, spicy and greasy. Maybe this isn't traditional, but I want somewhere to start.

Can you post a link to a good recipe? All pork and venison.

Thanks
You will definitely want to look for a Mexican Chorizo (Mexican as in Mexico) recipe.
All of the Spanish Chorizo (Spanish as in Spain) I have ever encountered is much more of a sausage like a bratwurst and is stuffed in a casting.
Mexican Chorizo is soooo much fattier and mushy and I have never seen it stuffed in a casing. I've seen it stuffed in bags and sold that way but never stuffed in a casting like a brat lol. For those that don't know if you buy Mexican Chorizo at a store in TX it comes in a package where the packing is shaped in a sausage shape BUT there is no casing involved and you just scoop/squeeze the meat out and cook it lol

I've never made Mexican Chorizo or Spanish Chorizo but I have eaten my weight in Mexican Chorizo many many times over lol. I really like dls1's recipe as the fat content from the pork belly and shoulder put the sausage in a very fatty consistency.

My favorite way to eat Mexican Chorizo by far is to throw some in a skillet and start cooking. Then take some Charro or Boracho Beans and refry them in a skillet with the cooking Chorizo!!!!! What you get is a magical blended mush where you basically cannot find a solid piece of chorizo meat as it has somehow perfectly infused with the mashed refried beans! Throw some of this mash in a tortilla with cheese and be prepared to have an amazing breakfast taco!
Throw it in with eggs and cheese or potatoes or any of your favorite breakfast taco fillings and be amazed!
Or you can just eat it with tortilla chips or fritos like a magical dip!
 

chef jimmyj

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This recipe sounds really good. I have purchased mex chorizo in bulk, natural casing and plastic tubes. I have yet to eat it or see it in a recipe that was still in a casing...JJ
 

dls1

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This recipe sounds really good. I have purchased mex chorizo in bulk, natural casing and plastic tubes. I have yet to eat it or see it in a recipe that was still in a casing...JJ
I understand what you're saying JJ, and just to set the record straight, whenever I make the chorizo recipe I posted, or any other form of chorizo, I never encase it. I always do it in bulk, then portion and freeze it. Same thing with Italian sausage. I simply included the stuffing in casings part as that's, in some cases, the final step in the recipe which some may want to do, and also because the encasing in Oaxaca is somewhat unique in that the sausage is formed as a ball rather than a traditional link. See the picture below.

Chorizo de Oaxaca
upload_2018-5-25_15-2-22.png
 
Last edited:

darwin101

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Green Chile chorizo is a nice variation that is rarely seen in the states. I like it more than the grocery store red version.
 

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