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Hot pickled sausage.

Discussion in 'Sausage' started by Steve H, Mar 15, 2019 at 2:33 AM.

  1. Steve H

    Steve H Smoking Fanatic SMF Premier Member

    P3141848.JPG So after trying the Penrose sausage recipe I figured I'd try a something a bit different.
    I'm using the Johnsonville kielbasa again. For the brine:
    3 packs of the kielbasa. 1 quart vinegar. I used cider vinegar. But white should be fine.
    1/2 quart water.
    1 cup of Franks hot sauce.
    1 Tablespoon cayenne pepper.
    Put the water, vinegar, hot sauce, and cayenne in a pot and bring to a boil.
    Divide the sausage into 2 quart jars. I kept them whole.
    In each jar add:
    2 teaspoons minced dried onion.
    1 teaspoon minced garlic.
    1 teaspoon dried red pepper.
    Pour the hot mixture to 1/2" of the jars. Seal, I vacuum sealed mine.
    I'll let them set for at least 2 weeks.
    Just as I got done and had everything put away. The wife comes home with cukes! So, out comes everything again. And I did a half gallon on Al's pickles. This time with white vinegar.
     
    shoebe, nepas and xray like this.
  2. indaswamp

    indaswamp Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    What is the purpose of pickled sausages? Did they use this as a preservation method years ago? Or is it just for the taste??? How long will they last on the counter? Or do they need to be refrigerated?
     
  3. Steve H

    Steve H Smoking Fanatic SMF Premier Member

    I'm not really sure why it started. I've eaten these since I was a kid. I've heard that these are shelf stable in temps below 75 degrees. Though I just keep em in the fridge.
     
  4. Holly2015

    Holly2015 Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    Around here they are hot bolognas and they are delicious with a cold beer and saltines.

    They are shelf stable but once you open the jug they go so quick that being shelf stable is not a concern. For the record I too keep mine in the fridge more because I like the texture when they are cold.
     
  5. xray

    xray Master of the Pit

    Oh yes, Hot Bologna! I truly love these, they’re one of my weaknesses.

    Every bar around here used to have them in a jar next to the potato chip rack and close to the Blind Robin’s (kippered herrings).

    They used Miller’s Hot Bologna that was made down the road in St. Claire, PA

    Very nicely done, Steve. I bet they’re gonna be great!
     
    Steve H likes this.
  6. nepas

    nepas Legendary Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    Nicely done.

    Like Holly said. When we lived in north east pa they were called hot bologna and in the coal cracker region (where we lived) they made soupy (i made these before) packed in olive oil or grape seed oil for years.
     
  7. indaswamp

    indaswamp Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Interesting....
    Way back in the day, the cajuns would pack processed salt meats from the pig butchering in barrels then pour hot lard over them. The lard would solidify, encasing the meats and preserve them. They would eat the meats in revers order from how they were stacked in the barrel...as they used up the lard, they had access to more meat.
     
  8. Holly2015

    Holly2015 Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    I went to apprenticeship school and then worked with a lot of folks from the coal region and they each had a closely guarded family recipe for souply. Each family also believed there recipe as the best and that all other ser second class. Personally I've never tired one that was good.

    Another delicacy from the Shamokin metro area is faggots. Small meatballs made with various organ meats and smothered in brown gravy. They are super rich and are really good. Hot pickled Krakowska is also very good.
     
  9. indaswamp

    indaswamp Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Nothing comes up on google when I type 'souply'...

    What exactly is it? anyone have a recipe I can look at?
     
  10. nepas

    nepas Legendary Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

  11. indaswamp

    indaswamp Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Thank you Nepas!
     
  12. nepas

    nepas Legendary Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    YW.

    Mine took while to make. Take the hog casing off before they go into the oil.
     
  13. xray

    xray Master of the Pit

    Yeah soupy is big around here. Where did you go to apprenticeship school?

    Lol, I never thought of Shamokin as a metropolis.

    We eat krakowska keilbasa, ham and bacon cold for Easter. The only thing missing in the picture is the Halupki as they’re in a pot on the stove and my Italian grams Easter Pie
    C0200A15-18F6-410B-BE6C-E20F6A30B59A.jpeg
    7248A87D-BA2E-4526-ADD5-8F74806F8855.jpeg
     
    Steve H likes this.
  14. Holly2015

    Holly2015 Smoking Fanatic OTBS Member

    Local 520 Plumbers & Pipefitters, Harrisburg July 27th, 1992

    The Shamokin metro area more of a tongue in cheek thing. Kulpmont, Elysburg, Ringold, Gordon, Richland, Ashland, Centralia all the Shamokin suburbs.

    Easter growing up was homemade sweet Easter bread in braids, kielbasa to compliment the Easter ham followed by pizzella and Crispelle w/ raisins at my maternal grandparents. They have long since passed.

    This year my mother is making me cappelletti soup for Easter. I cannot wait!