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WDFraph

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Jul 6, 2022
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Hello fellow smokers,

Here's my second post in here.

I just upgraded from a cheap bullet smoker to this beast down there.
20220531_143123.jpg


I just have one problem.

Looking to make beef inside round roast jerky and the recipe I made before upgrading was asking for an internal temp of 170°f but I'm unable to go lower than 200. Here's a photo of the result with my old cheap smoker...

20220528_180731.jpg


I think the best would be coals and not lump?
What would be an ideal setup?
Snake? Something else? A row of 1 coals?
In between the fire and the meat, should I place a drip pan of water?

I've got an amazing recipe, can't wait to cook it as much as possible but I fail everytime...

What would you do?

Thanks a lot to you guys!
 
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SmokinAl

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Unless your making sausage, most of us smoke at 225 or higher. Or if you have a pellet grill, then there is a extreme smoke setting that keeps the grill at 180 degrees. But for a charcoal grill, anything between 225 & 300 would be just fine. Your grill looks like a pizza oven, so you would want some really high temps for pizza (500-700). And also welcome to SMF!!
Al
 

gmc2003

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170* is going to be tough to maintain for any length of time. Many members on site are regular kettle smokers/grillers. So if your looking to cook something in particular just ask away, and we'll help you out. Try to be as specific as you can. I know Quebec is a predominantly french speaking province so don't be frustrated if someone asks for more clarification.

Chris
 
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Brokenhandle

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Welcome from Iowa! And that's a nice setup you have there!
Can't help ya with those temps though

Ryan
 

WDFraph

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Original poster
Thread starter
Jul 6, 2022
7
3
170* is going to be tough to maintain for any length of time. Many members on site are regular kettle smokers/grillers. So if your looking to cook something in particular just ask away, and we'll help you out. Try to be as specific as you can. I know Quebec is a predominantly french speaking province so don't be frustrated if someone asks for more clarification.

Chris
Thank you Chris, yes, I edited the post! Inside round roast jerky's what I'm lookin for this time!
 

BigW.

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May 13, 2019
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So you want to make jerky on your kettle? I think that may be tough to keep a low temp for several hours. I might try lighting a few coals and a very small snake. After 1-2 hours of smoke I would bring into the house for an oven or dehydrator finish. There is just not a ton of room for jerky in a kettle and running a low temp is hard. An upright electric with several racks makes it easier.
 

indaswamp

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South Louisiana-Yes, it is HOT
I made before upgrading was asking for an internal temp of 170°f but I'm unable to go lower than 200
200*F is about right if you want the internal temperature of the meat to be 170*F. Most cuts of meat will track 25-30*F below the chamber temperature....

That said, I smoke jerky @160*F and look for an INT of at least 145*F. But dryness is important as well. I just pull it when it is dry to my liking.
 

WDFraph

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Original poster
Thread starter
Jul 6, 2022
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3
So you want to make jerky on your kettle? I think that may be tough to keep a low temp for several hours.
Thx for the comment, the setup I've got is identical to a WSM in many ways, just a little lower. It's a 22 inches so I can put 4 lbs of 1/4" cut beef round in there (180 pieces).

Top, bottom and all-in-one door are sealed so there's no leakage. The only difference I know is the bottom vent being a one-touch...

So, I use this kettle the same way I use a bullet smoker in everyday use..
 

gmc2003

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Thank you Chris, yes, I edited the post! Inside round roast jerky's what I'm lookin for this time!

I've never done Jerky before let alone using one of my kettles. However I do think what your looking to do is possible. If I were to give it a go. I'd probable use a single row snake. I would start it with two or three fully lit charcoal briquettes at one end. With the bottom vents wide open - let the kettles temp come up to about 25* below your target temp(In this case about 150*). Then start shutting down the bottom vents slowly. About a pencils width at a time. Let the kettle settle in on a steady temp and if needed make another adjustment. Once the temp is settled in add the meat. For the first time I would snake the charcoals all the way around the kettles bottom and rotate the top grate so the meat isn't directly over the hot part of the snake. For smoke I would add wood chips for this. Chips don't burn as hot as chunks. Just place them over the top of the unlit briquettes. If you have something like a pellet tube or maze then use that. Keep the top vent wide open to allow for good air flow. Someone else like chopsaw chopsaw will hopefully chime in and give you better directions on the snake method, or possibly a better way of doing what your asking. Good luck and let us know how it turns out. Oh and I wouldn't add any liquid in the drip pan. Your trying to keep the driest environment as possible.

Chris
 

chopsaw

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gmc2003 gmc2003 I hope the thread title didn't make you think of me . Not sure what the title means ,,,,

Having a hard time tracking which thread I'm in . Always best to keep like questions in one thread .

My thoughts go to the insert you've added . How good it seals will directly effect your temp control .
I would do a run without the insert first to see where your temps are . Let it run and settle in then
Add the insert and see what it does .

Was it the other thread you said you closed both top and bottom vents ?
If it runs away and you close the top , heat cant get out .

Leave the top open , adjust the bottom . If it's way to hot close the bottom and take the lid off and let the temps drop .

Does that kettle have the markings on the ash catcher ?
I can't see , because it's clocked wrong .
Like said in the other thread , take it off and spin it so it faces the working side of the kettle .

You can control the heat in a kettle by the size of the fire / amount of charcoal .
Figure out how many lit coals it takes to get close to the temp you want , then add 1 , 2 or 3 per hour . Whatever it takes . All vents stay open for the most part .
Outside temps will effect it too .

If I was going to do jerky on my kettle I would control temps with the amount of lit coals .
 
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gmc2003

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gmc2003 gmc2003 I hope the thread title didn't make you think of me . Not sure what the title means ,,,,

That thought never crossed my mind - until I read your post. :emoji_astonished:

Seriously I know you know your way around the kettle and use the snake method for certain cooks. I just figured if anyone knew how to keep the temps that low it would be Rich.

Chris
 
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noboundaries

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I've made jerky in both my Kettle and WSM. Here's what I've done.

Bottom one-touch vent fully closed on the Kettle; bottom vents fully closed on WSM.
Top vent full open.
Use a brick or two to build a heat fence off to one side. If you have a Smoke n Sear or Smokenator, use that instead of the bricks.
Put down a single layer of briquettes behind the fence. Add some small pieces of wood on the single layer.
Add another couple layers or more of briquettes.
Place 4 half-ashed hot briquettes on the top center of the pile.
Put lid on, vent opposite fuel pile, and let it come SLOWLY up to temp. Usually 2-3 hours.
Add the meat.
Monitor the temp. If it starts to climb beyond your target, close the top vent 1/16" at a time and give it 20 minutes to respond. You'll be burning clean by then so no need to worry about stale smoke.

I can make jerky in my kitchen oven in 4-5 hours. It takes 6-7 on average (not including pre-heat) in the WSM and Kettle due to less airflow. I do use Prague Powder #1 in my marinades to increase safety because I don't like salt-forward jerky.
 

indaswamp

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How do you reach 165?
My advice to you would not apply because I use a true smokehouse that has 36cu.ft. of space. It is 2.5'x2.5'x6'tall....see my avatar picture. I can dial the heat back and maintain 120*F for hours. It is a purpose build smokehouse for smoking sausages, but I cook everything in it.
 

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