Stick or charcoal burners

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gr0uch0

Master of the Pit
Original poster
Apr 30, 2016
1,231
139
Displaced Texan in Door County WI
Seeing several folks recently picking up--and building--nice, heavy duty rigs, wondering if a weed burner (if someone had access to one) could be used for a burn-in, as opposed to a much longer, wood or charcoal fire.  Realize that we're talking about sizeable btu thrown by weed burners, and certainly wouldn't suggest for a thin COS, pellet pooper, MES, MPS, or the like.  But with a rig that's built like some we've seen, would this be a viable, quicker alternative?  Open up the doors and lids, a couple of dances around the FB and the CC with the wand (think:  pressure wash), and that's it, so that these guys who are chomping at the bit to use their new toy can get at it more quickly.  Or am I out in left field?

Thoughts??
 
I don't think that would work, because part of the process of seasoning a smoker is to get a nice smoke film on all the metal, and you wouldn't get that with just a weedburner.

Al
 
I'm going at it more from burning out all the cutting oils/films, Al, that could be (I think) done in a rather expeditious fashion, and their first actual cook starts the seasoning process.  It can take years to acquire a fully seasoned pit with wood and/or charcoal, as you know.
 
I imagine if all you were trying to do is burn off the manufacturing/fabricating gunk, then a weed burner could definitely accomplish that faster than building a fire.  But like Al said, that doesn't do much for seasoning.  And a lot of guys I know like to do the burn-in with a fire in the pit, so they can begin to get a feel for temp control and fire management in that pit.

Red
 
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I imagine if all you were trying to do is burn off the manufacturing/fabricating gunk, then a weed burner could definitely accomplish that faster than building a fire.  But like Al said, that doesn't do much for seasoning.  And a lot of guys I know like to do the burn-in with a fire in the pit, so they can begin to get a feel for temp control and fire management in that pit.

Red
Good point, Red--that's certainly a pro for going with the conventional method.  But does the CC truly get hot enough to dispense with all of the manufacturing goo, or are we really just covering it up with a layer of smoke?  I wouldn't think the FB would be an issue, but the CC has me wondering....
 
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Squib, you had flame in CC also, not just in FB, correct??  I've known some who only flame the FB.
Yes, I suggest an intense fire in the cooking chamber for new builds, a manufactured pit on the other hand, I would would do a steam cleaning with a red hot firebox, then do a few seasoning runs.

You could build a fire right in the cook chamber or drop a few chimneys of lump in there but I don't think it's needed for manufactured pits like Langs, unless someone had one built from questionable supplies...if that makes sense.
 
Long before charcoal, early hominids lit logs and tossed the meat into the inferno where it promptly turned black. They soon learned that holding the food above the fire  (direct heat) or to the side of the fire  (indirect heat) made it taste better than burning it to a crisp in the fire.

Eventually four solutions evolved: Open pits, ovens, closed pits, and portable pits.

Open pits. As the centuries marched, cooks evolved their methods by digging holes, throwing in logs and setting them on fire, laying a grid of sticks across the pit, and placing the meat well above the intense heat. This "open pit" method had the advantage of slowly roasting the meat, with the added benefit of smoke, which improved flavor and preserved the meat.
 
Long before charcoal, early hominids lit logs and tossed the meat into the inferno where it promptly turned black. They soon learned that holding the food above the fire (direct heat) or to the side of the fire (indirect heat) made it taste better than burning it to a crisp in the fire.



Eventually four solutions evolved: Open pits, ovens, closed pits, and portable pits.



Open pits. As the centuries marched, cooks evolved their methods by digging holes, throwing in logs and setting them on fire, laying a grid of sticks across the pit, and placing the meat well above the intense heat. This "open pit" method had the advantage of slowly roasting the meat, with the added benefit of smoke, which improved flavor and preserved the meat.

Not sure what any of the above quote has to do with the original--and subsequent--posts about breaking in and seasoning a new pit....
 
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Either way will work "For your initial tank burn out. The advantage of building a fire is , light it and let it burn out. With the weed burner you will have to spend a little time, bot get the job done,

I love my weed burner, for starting my splits or charcoal, going over my grates and warming up my smoker quickly.

Noe Seasoning a smoker is a whole different process.

Gary
 
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