• Some of the links on this forum allow SMF, at no cost to you, to earn a small commission when you click through and make a purchase. Let me know if you have any questions about this.

Pastrami rub recipe

Inscrutable

Smoking Fanatic
406
246
Joined Apr 4, 2019
The couple recent pastrami threads triggered this. Seems black pepper, coriander, onion, and garlic is pretty universal and close to what many of you are applying.
I found this recipe as ostensibly the Katz Deli (NYC) recipe. It adds a few ingredients I rarely see mentioned. I will list ingredients with relative proportion, you can do the math depending how big a batch you want to make (probably we all know 1Tbs = 3 tsp, and 16 Tbs in a cup, so if using Tbs for all this would make about 2 cups) And when I note powder/seed or peppercorns, it means half as powder and half as cracked or very coarse ground seeds/peppercorns.

12 Black pepper ground/peppercorns
6 Coriander powder/seeds
3 Brown sugar
3 Paprika
2 Garlic powder
2 Onion powder
1 Mustard powder/seeds

Didn’t have the seeds when I made it so used preground/powder for all. Taste was really good and close to faded memories of visits to good delis. See what you think if you try.
 

chef jimmyj

Epic Pitmaster
Staff member
Moderator
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Group Lead
19,211
3,593
Joined May 12, 2011
I use a similar mix, with a couple extra ingredients. Mine is a cross between NY and Montreal.
You have a nice mix there...JJ
 

thirdeye

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
825
710
Joined Dec 1, 2019
The couple recent pastrami threads triggered this. Seems black pepper, coriander, onion, and garlic is pretty universal and close to what many of you are applying.
I found this recipe as ostensibly the Katz Deli (NYC) recipe. It adds a few ingredients I rarely see mentioned. I will list ingredients with relative proportion, you can do the math depending how big a batch you want to make (probably we all know 1Tbs = 3 tsp, and 16 Tbs in a cup, so if using Tbs for all this would make about 2 cups) And when I note powder/seed or peppercorns, it means half as powder and half as cracked or very coarse ground seeds/peppercorns.

12 Black pepper ground/peppercorns
6 Coriander powder/seeds
3 Brown sugar
3 Paprika
2 Garlic powder
2 Onion powder
1 Mustard powder/seeds

Didn’t have the seeds when I made it so used preground/powder for all. Taste was really good and close to faded memories of visits to good delis. See what you think if you try.
My pastrami seasoning has similar ingredients, but is more pepper dominate. The Montreal seasoning has many duplicated ingredients, and it's function is to provide a degree of coarseness. Sugar is an ingredient in many pastrami rubs, mainly to offset the harshness of salt used in the corning process.... I omitted it because on home corned beef I use a lower salt percentage and on storebought corned beef I do a 5 to 6 hour soak-out.

4 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper - coarse
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon granulated garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
2 teaspoons Canadian/Montreal Steak seasoning
1/2 teaspoon thyme, dried
1 teaspoon paprika
Combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly.
 

Brian Trommater

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
748
558
Joined Aug 1, 2018
You all trying to get my change my corned beef to pastrami . Started brining Sunday. Was going to give the smoker a rest.
 

tallbm

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
4,403
1,527
Joined Dec 30, 2016
In my ground venison pastrami sandwich meat the recipe calls for a little bit of Juniper Berry. What kind of pastrami does the use of juniper berry make?
Im hoping someone has input or maybe chef jimmyj chef jimmyj knows.
 

Inscrutable

Smoking Fanatic
406
246
Joined Apr 4, 2019
I do not know why. I would say a lot of folks like to put their own spin on to suit their own preferences or palates ... perfectly fine and happens all the time in everything. Life would be pretty boring in monochrome.
 

Brian Trommater

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
748
558
Joined Aug 1, 2018
Not at all. Just occurred to me to post this after seeing a few pastrami threads and I took mine out to make a grilled pastrami/Swiss on rye/pumpernickel swirl. I love corned beef too!
Guess I will have to work on a rye sourdough. I need give up bread for a while. Having problems getting my blood sugar back in check! I kind of let it go for a while. Just cant stay on the straight and narrow.
 

thirdeye

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
825
710
Joined Dec 1, 2019
In my ground venison pastrami sandwich meat the recipe calls for a little bit of Juniper Berry. What kind of pastrami does the use of juniper berry make?
Im hoping someone has input or maybe chef jimmyj chef jimmyj knows.
I can share this recipe regarding juniper berries, and a real twist on pastrami with two sweet glazes. This recipe comes by way of a guest contributor to my online pastrami write-up:

Pre-soak the brisket(s) for 48 hours in cool water (iced to maintain the temperature below 40°, or kept in the refrigerator in a bucket or zipper bag). Add some roughly cubed, raw potatoes to the water, (appox 2 pounds) to help soak up some of the salts that are drawn out of the brisket. Change the water, and potatoes, every 12 hours. Some of the water from the last soak may be saved and used for boiling cabbage.

At the end of the soaking time discard the potatoes, remove the brisket, and let dry. Then apply the following rub, reserving some for another coating before slicing. Wrap brisket in plastic, then refrigerate overnight.

RUB:
4 parts ground peppercorns
4 parts ground coriander seeds
2 parts Turbinado sugar
2 parts ground Juniper berries
1 part ground onion powder
1 part thyme, ground
1 part paprika
1 part ground garlic powder
1 part ground ginger
1/2 part ground cloves
1/2 part ground nutmeg

On cooking day bring brisket to room temperature, then cook with an indirect set up at 275° (grate temperature) until the internal temperature is 180°. Allow about 1 hour per pound for cooking.

During the last 1/2 hour of the cook, glaze the brisket with one of these two concoctions, then rest about 1/2 hour, re-apply rub liberally, then slice against the grain and serve. This is Heaven.

Glaze # 1
1 cup honey
1 cup maple syrup
1/2 tablespoon cinnamon
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar

Heat liquids gently, over low heat, until warm to touch. Then add cinnamon, and slowly mix in confectioner’s sugar until thoroughly mixed. Take off heat, set aside until needed, Use to glaze meat while on cooker. Reserve some glaze to serve on the side at the table.

Glaze # 2
1-16 oz package fresh cranberries
1 cup sugar, (Turbinado sugar is a nice touch)
1 jar, approximately, 10 oz. of Red Currant Jam
1- 8 oz container of Honey Mustard

Put cranberries in a 3-4 Qt pot on low, and add sugar... stir occasionally, cook until cranberries start to "pop". Add Red Currant Jam, and Honey Mustard and let simmer for approximately 10 minutes, stirring a few times during the process. Take off heat, set aside until needed use to glaze meat while on cooker. Reserve some glaze to serve on the side at the table.
Cooks Notes:
I'm of an Irish, "off the boat” heritage, and have been tweaking this recipe since the mid 70's. Only in the last 4 years have I hit what I call "Corn Beef Nirvana".


Bobberqer
 

thirdeye

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
825
710
Joined Dec 1, 2019
One more to toss out there.... has anyone had corned beef or pastrami served with the hot Oriental mustard? I had it at a St Patrick's Day party one year, and it's a good combination. I like it better on left over sandwiches.
 

mushroomboots

Fire Starter
42
7
Joined Oct 4, 2018
Guess I will have to work on a rye sourdough. I need give up bread for a while. Having problems getting my blood sugar back in check! I kind of let it go for a while. Just cant stay on the straight and narrow.
Best of luck. I know it can be hard, but I sure appreciate your persistence. We want you to stay healthy and around ;)
 

tallbm

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
4,403
1,527
Joined Dec 30, 2016
Thanks for the info thirdeye thirdeye !
I am gonna make a combination of my existing ground pastrami seasoning and the others like the ones posted here and give this a shot on 2 brisket flats
 

MJB05615

Smoking Fanatic
545
196
Joined May 12, 2018
I can share this recipe regarding juniper berries, and a real twist on pastrami with two sweet glazes. This recipe comes by way of a guest contributor to my online pastrami write-up:

Pre-soak the brisket(s) for 48 hours in cool water (iced to maintain the temperature below 40°, or kept in the refrigerator in a bucket or zipper bag). Add some roughly cubed, raw potatoes to the water, (appox 2 pounds) to help soak up some of the salts that are drawn out of the brisket. Change the water, and potatoes, every 12 hours. Some of the water from the last soak may be saved and used for boiling cabbage.

At the end of the soaking time discard the potatoes, remove the brisket, and let dry. Then apply the following rub, reserving some for another coating before slicing. Wrap brisket in plastic, then refrigerate overnight.

RUB:
4 parts ground peppercorns
4 parts ground coriander seeds
2 parts Turbinado sugar
2 parts ground Juniper berries
1 part ground onion powder
1 part thyme, ground
1 part paprika
1 part ground garlic powder
1 part ground ginger
1/2 part ground cloves
1/2 part ground nutmeg

On cooking day bring brisket to room temperature, then cook with an indirect set up at 275° (grate temperature) until the internal temperature is 180°. Allow about 1 hour per pound for cooking.

During the last 1/2 hour of the cook, glaze the brisket with one of these two concoctions, then rest about 1/2 hour, re-apply rub liberally, then slice against the grain and serve. This is Heaven.

Glaze # 1
1 cup honey
1 cup maple syrup
1/2 tablespoon cinnamon
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar

Heat liquids gently, over low heat, until warm to touch. Then add cinnamon, and slowly mix in confectioner’s sugar until thoroughly mixed. Take off heat, set aside until needed, Use to glaze meat while on cooker. Reserve some glaze to serve on the side at the table.

Glaze # 2
1-16 oz package fresh cranberries
1 cup sugar, (Turbinado sugar is a nice touch)
1 jar, approximately, 10 oz. of Red Currant Jam
1- 8 oz container of Honey Mustard

Put cranberries in a 3-4 Qt pot on low, and add sugar... stir occasionally, cook until cranberries start to "pop". Add Red Currant Jam, and Honey Mustard and let simmer for approximately 10 minutes, stirring a few times during the process. Take off heat, set aside until needed use to glaze meat while on cooker. Reserve some glaze to serve on the side at the table.
Cooks Notes:
I'm of an Irish, "off the boat” heritage, and have been tweaking this recipe since the mid 70's. Only in the last 4 years have I hit what I call "Corn Beef Nirvana".


Bobberqer
That is one excellent recipe! I'm gonna give it a try as soon as I can get a Brisket. Price is coming down a little, but out of stock most of the time now.
Thanks,

Mike
 

chef jimmyj

Epic Pitmaster
Staff member
Moderator
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Group Lead
19,211
3,593
Joined May 12, 2011
Juniper is great on Pastrami. My Go To Rub is below...JJ

Better 'en NY Pastrami Rub

2T Turbinado Sugar
2T Black Peppercorns
1T Coriander Seed
1T Dill Seed
1T Dry Minced Onion
1T Dry Minced Garlic
1tsp Allspice Berries (6-8ea)
1tsp Mustard Seed
1tsp Dry Thyme Leaves
3 Bay Leaves, crumbled
1tsp Juniper Berries (6-8ea)

All Spices are Whole and were toasted in a dry pan over Medium heat until fragrant.
Let the Spices cool then Grind in a cheapo Coffee Grinder until slightly less than Coarse. The Garlic and Onion do not need to be toasted. If grinding do so only slightly as the Minced size is pretty close to perfect for Pastrami.
 

tallbm

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
4,403
1,527
Joined Dec 30, 2016
Juniper is great on Pastrami. My Go To Rub is below...JJ

Better 'en NY Pastrami Rub

2T Turbinado Sugar
2T Black Peppercorns
1T Coriander Seed
1T Dill Seed
1T Dry Minced Onion
1T Dry Minced Garlic
1tsp Allspice Berries
1tsp Mustard Seed
1tsp Dry Thyme Leaves
3 Bay Leaves, crumbled
1tsp Juniper Berries (6-8ea)

All Spices are Whole and were toasted in a dry pan over Medium heat until fragrant.
Let the Spices cool then Grind in a cheapo Coffee Grinder until slightly less than Coarse. The Garlic and Onion do not need to be toasted. If grinding do so only slightly as the Minced size is pretty close to perfect for Pastrami.
Nice! Your extra seasonings sound about like my pickling spice i have ground up already hahaha. Im debating on brining/curing with all of that then coating with cracked black pepper and some corriander for the final smoke in maple wood. Any red flags with that?
 

chef jimmyj

Epic Pitmaster
Staff member
Moderator
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Group Lead
19,211
3,593
Joined May 12, 2011
I mostly turn Corned Points, from St Patty's Day, into Pastrami. It my understanding the commercial brine/cure they inject contains classic Pickling Spice. I add my Rub and get great results. The spices in the brine will taste different than the surface spices. Herbs and Spices have Water Soluble flavors and Fat Soluble flavors. So the combo gives an overall result. There are no red flags with your plan...JJ
 

mushroomboots

Fire Starter
42
7
Joined Oct 4, 2018
I can share this recipe regarding juniper berries, and a real twist on pastrami with two sweet glazes. This recipe comes by way of a guest contributor to my online pastrami write-up:

Pre-soak the brisket(s) for 48 hours in cool water (iced to maintain the temperature below 40°, or kept in the refrigerator in a bucket or zipper bag). Add some roughly cubed, raw potatoes to the water, (appox 2 pounds) to help soak up some of the salts that are drawn out of the brisket. Change the water, and potatoes, every 12 hours. Some of the water from the last soak may be saved and used for boiling cabbage.

At the end of the soaking time discard the potatoes, remove the brisket, and let dry. Then apply the following rub, reserving some for another coating before slicing. Wrap brisket in plastic, then refrigerate overnight.

RUB:
4 parts ground peppercorns
4 parts ground coriander seeds
2 parts Turbinado sugar
2 parts ground Juniper berries
1 part ground onion powder
1 part thyme, ground
1 part paprika
1 part ground garlic powder
1 part ground ginger
1/2 part ground cloves
1/2 part ground nutmeg

On cooking day bring brisket to room temperature, then cook with an indirect set up at 275° (grate temperature) until the internal temperature is 180°. Allow about 1 hour per pound for cooking.

During the last 1/2 hour of the cook, glaze the brisket with one of these two concoctions, then rest about 1/2 hour, re-apply rub liberally, then slice against the grain and serve. This is Heaven.

Glaze # 1
1 cup honey
1 cup maple syrup
1/2 tablespoon cinnamon
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar

Heat liquids gently, over low heat, until warm to touch. Then add cinnamon, and slowly mix in confectioner’s sugar until thoroughly mixed. Take off heat, set aside until needed, Use to glaze meat while on cooker. Reserve some glaze to serve on the side at the table.

Glaze # 2
1-16 oz package fresh cranberries
1 cup sugar, (Turbinado sugar is a nice touch)
1 jar, approximately, 10 oz. of Red Currant Jam
1- 8 oz container of Honey Mustard

Put cranberries in a 3-4 Qt pot on low, and add sugar... stir occasionally, cook until cranberries start to "pop". Add Red Currant Jam, and Honey Mustard and let simmer for approximately 10 minutes, stirring a few times during the process. Take off heat, set aside until needed use to glaze meat while on cooker. Reserve some glaze to serve on the side at the table.
Cooks Notes:
I'm of an Irish, "off the boat” heritage, and have been tweaking this recipe since the mid 70's. Only in the last 4 years have I hit what I call "Corn Beef Nirvana".


Bobberqer
Looks wonderful! I'm going to try it on a venison eye of round I currently have defrosting. Thank you for sharing.
 

mushroomboots

Fire Starter
42
7
Joined Oct 4, 2018
Looks wonderful! I'm going to try it on a venison eye of round I currently have defrosting. Thank you for sharing.
It occurs to me that the recipe does not include the type or amount of salt in the brine. Any information on this, and also why the potatoes to soak up salt as opposed to just using less salt?
 

Latest posts

Hot Threads

Top Bottom
  AdBlock Detected

We noticed that you're using an ad-blocker, which could block some critical website features. For the best possible site experience please take a moment to disable your AdBlocker.