It's a GUIDELINE not a Rule!

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chef jimmyj

Gone but not forgotten. RIP
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You will see many posts like,
At 275° a Spatched Turkey will probably take 20 minutes a pound to an IT of 165 in the Breast.
At 225 a Butt will likely take 1.5 to 2 hours a pound to 205.
At 225 a Brisket will usually take 1 to1.5 hours per pound to 195.
These are simple to remember, easy for a Newbie to understand and have many years of Pitmaster's experience that have provided these Estimates.
The biggest misconception....Calling any time per pound a RULE! For instance, 1 to 1.5 hours per pound at 225, to an IT of 195, for Brisket is a GUIDELINE, A TOOL, A TIMING ESTIMATE. It is in No Way an End All, Be All RULE! Now, since this X hours per Pound at Y°F is based on decades and generations of experience using pits of all kinds, these Guidlines are useful to get an " Idea " when to start smoking the meat to be done or close to done, in a specific time frame, like a 5pm Supper.
Of course every piece of meat is different. A Thick and Short 10 pound Porkloin, is going to take a bit longer than a Thinner and Longer 10 pound Porkloin. But, unless you are cooking ahead and don't care how long it takes, Everyone needs some kind timing to go by.
X hours per pound at Y°F until and IT of Z°F, is a Solid Plan for the meats they are intended for. However, it's just an Educated Guess. You still need to monitor the IT, the smoker temp and the Clock. You still need to perform other tests for doneness. Examples, a Guidline for Spare Ribs is 3-2-1 but the Bend Test or the meat is Falling off the Bone, will tell you the Ribs are Done regardless of how long they took. Adjustments with any meat will likely have to be made.
Brisket going long? Wrap and/or crank up the temp.
Brisket going too Fast? Lower the temp, spritz more often to cool the meat or let it finish to 10°F Lower than desired, and cooler it until ready to eat.
There are no Black and White RULES in Smoking Meat. But, to get you started, we have some Great Guidelines you can use to Estimate when to get started the begin Testing for doneness...JJ
 
Thanks guys. Adam, making a new post was a good idea...JJ
 
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You will see many posts like,
At 275° a Spatched Turkey will probably take 20 minutes a pound to an IT of 165 in the Breast.
At 225 a Butt will likely take 1.5 to 2 hours a pound to 205.
At 225 a Brisket will usually take 1 to1.5 hours per pound to 195.
These are simple to remember, easy for a Newbie to understand and have many years of Pitmaster's experience that have provided these Estimates.
The biggest misconception....Calling any time per pound a RULE! For instance, 1 to 1.5 hours per pound at 225, to an IT of 195, for Brisket is a GUIDELINE, A TOOL, A TIMING ESTIMATE. It is in No Way an End All, Be All RULE! Now, since this X hours per Pound at Y°F is based on decades and generations of experience using pits of all kinds, these Guidlines are useful to get an " Idea " when to start smoking the meat to be done or close to done, in a specific time frame, like a 5pm Supper.
Of course every piece of meat is different. A Thick and Short 10 pound Porkloin, is going to take a bit longer than a Thinner and Longer 10 pound Porkloin. But, unless you are cooking ahead and don't care how long it takes, Everyone needs some kind timing to go by.
X hours per pound at Y°F until and IT of Z°F, is a Solid Plan for the meats they are intended for. However, it's just an Educated Guess. You still need to monitor the IT, the smoker temp and the Clock. You still need to perform other tests for doneness. Examples, a Guidline for Spare Ribs is 3-2-1 but the Bend Test or the meat is Falling off the Bone, will tell you the Ribs are Done regardless of how long they took. Adjustments with any meat will likely have to be made.
Brisket going long? Wrap and/or crank up the temp.
Brisket going too Fast? Lower the temp, spritz more often to cool the meat or let it finish to 10°F Lower than desired, and cooler it until ready to eat.
There are no Black and White RULES in Smoking Meat. But, to get you started, we have some Great Guidelines you can use to Estimate when to get started the begin Testing for doneness...JJ
Truer words have never been spoken. Figuring it all out is what makes it fun. I have many years of “fun” left, I’m afraid :)
 
I would assume these approximations also include a certain starting internal temp as part of the equation. Obviously a pork butt started at a IT of 34 degrees will take longer than one started at a IT room temp of say, 65 degrees.

If I am in accurate on this analogy please advise us.
 
I would assume these approximations also include a certain starting internal temp as part of the equation. Obviously a pork butt started at a IT of 34 degrees will take longer than one started at a IT room temp of say, 65 degrees.

If I am in accurate on this analogy please advise us.

Do you really want to let your butt sit on the counter long enough until it reaches an IT of 65*? I think that's just asking for trouble.

Chris
 
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I would assume these approximations also include a certain starting internal temp as part of the equation. Obviously a pork butt started at a IT of 34 degrees will take longer than one started at a IT room temp of say, 65 degrees.

If I am in accurate on this analogy please advise us.

For safety sake I go from the fridge to the smoker. I do not let my meat sit around at room temp, period!
Al
 
Theres a lot that affects a cook that folks don't think about some times, pit style/ metal thickness/heat retention, air temp,wind,humidity , all change and affect time a lot. you can predict how long it will take in a oven for the simple fact of where its at, also insulated smokers are easier to predict time. Luck of the draw still falls into all of the above because some times meat can be stubborn lol. Main thing is allow yourself xtra time and use it to enjoy some refreshments or clean the mess you have made getting every thing ready lol.
 
Great post chef jimmyj chef jimmyj When i first got into smokin I hadn't heard any of the X time per pound. Most of what I read was about IT. when I started to see it - all I could think was..."well kinda, but..."

I would only use some time estimate to know; am in for an all day/overnight sitch or a few hours for same day supper :)
 
Do you really want to let your butt sit on the counter long enough until it reaches an IT of 65*? I think that's just asking for trouble.

Chris

I agree GMC.
I was just pointing out that starting IT makes a big difference in cook time ( maybe I used a bad analogy)
I was just stating 65 degrees as a (room temp). I see many times where people say to let the meat come to room temp for an hour or more. ( I realize the meat IT will never get to room temp in an hour or so)
So now am I to take that as NOT a literal statement for an IT?, but just a time frame to allow the meat to come above the refrigeration temp of 34 degrees?
 
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This is a great discussion! I despise that hour-on-the-counter advice I read everywhere. I always want to scream "how can a 34F piece of meat reach a room temp of 68F in a 75F room when it takes almost an hour to reach 75F in a 225F smoker?!? I guess the laws of thermodynamics are different on countertops. An hour on the countertop might get the meat to 40F if the kitchen is in the 80s. If my meat is sitting on the countertop, I just prepped it and am waiting on my smoker to hit a desired temp and TBS.

As far as timing, I have "same day" and "next day" smokes, and adjust my chamber temps accordingly, even during a smoke. I always try to finish early and rest the meat. It makes things so much more relaxing.
 
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Do you really want to let your butt sit on the counter long enough until it reaches an IT of 65*? I think that's just asking for trouble.

Chris
I don't think you would want my butt sit on the counter long enough until it reaches an IT of 65degrees, I might be getting a little stinky be then. :emoji_grin:

Great post Chef jimmyj!
 
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