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Fool proof grilled pizza dough?

Hawaiianbrian

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I bought the Webber pizza attachment for my kettle and tried a few pizzas and they were a disaster. The dough stuck mostly to the stone and they pretty much all came out crappy. Does anyone have a fool proof semi basic dough recipe for the grill that I could use as a starter?
 

bradger

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I don't know of a dough but to prevent sticking my stone recommended corn meal on the stone before putting the dough on. mine is not for a grill though.
 

JJS

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I have used the Bobby flay pizza dough recipe with great success on the grill. Let it rest in the refrigerator for 3-4 days and the flavor really comes out of it.

A few questions:
Is your stone seasoned probably?
Was you stone hot enough?

I have never had an issue with them sticking to the stone.
 

bregent

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Really depends on the type of pizza you are making. Here's my same day dough formula for NY style. This is for 2x 17 inch skins. You can skip the malt powder if you don't have any. Mix for 9 minutes on low. Bench rest for 20 minutes. Divide and put into oiled containers and rest until doubled. If you want to retard in the fridge, adjust the yeast down.

All measurements in grams

Bread Flour: 680
Salt: 17
Sugar: 10
Yeast: 2.75
Water @75F: 400
Oil: 14
Malt Powder: 7

pizza5.jpg


But I have the same questions as JJS. If you stone is hot, it's hard to imagine dough sticking no matter how wet it is.
 
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Hawaiianbrian

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Bergent. That looks amazing. I might give that a go today. I know my buddy said to put the stone in the oven on brook for around 20 minutes so I might give that a try along with your dough recipe. My only questions are- you just mix all the ingredients you listed, mix, let rest, but what do you mean divide into oiled containers until doubled? Just coat a container with oil and separate it into 2 separate dough balls until it has doubled in size?
 

Hawaiianbrian

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I don’t think I seasoned the stone either? I remember seeing in the instructions that it didn’t need it or it was ore seasoned. It was just the Webber kettle pizza kit off amazon.
 

bregent

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I've never seasoned a stone.
I always heat the stone at baking temp (550F for me) for at least 45 minutes, up to an hour. That recipe was for two large pizza's, so after letting it rest I divide the dough into two equal pieces. Then oil 2 plastic containers large enough to accommodate the dough doubling, put the dough inside and flip it around to coat it with the oil. Put a lid on and rest until about doubled.

You are probably making smaller pizza's -I don't advise starting out making 17" pizza - so you'll have to adjust the recipe accordingly. Do you know the diameter of the pizza's that you are aiming for? There are plenty of online pizza dough calculators that will help you formulate the dough for a given size.
 

bluebombersfan

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Whoa awesome looking dough! I keep trying different ones looking for the best! Will have to try yours.
 

zwiller

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zwiller

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I forgot to mention putting a cold stone in a hot oven/grill is what causes them to break.
 

dannylang

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i always use the bobby flays perfect pizza dough, look it up on google.
dannylang
 

chef jimmyj

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If anyone is interested, I make the thicker Sicilia Pan Pizza. For a 13" × 18", Half Sheet Pan (12 Slices ).
Dough
5C Bread Flour
2T Sugar
1T Kosher Salt
1 pkg Quick Rise Yeast
2T EVOO
2C Warm (120°F) Water

Preheat oven to 375°F

Combine the first 5 ingredients in a KA Mixer with Dough Hook. Mix on Low adding Water in a steady stream. Mix 10 minutes until smooth dough forms. Oil the Sheet Pan well, 2T EVOO. Place dough on the pan, turn in oil, cover with any plastic bag and Proof 1 Hour at 75 to 90°F. Remove plastic and Pat the dough, evenly, into the pan. Allow a bit of extra dough to push up the sides to get a thicker Crust. Top as desired.
Bake for 15 minutes, turn and bake an additional 15 minutes or until the cheese, etc is the desired color...JJ
 

pc farmer

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If anyone is interested, I make the thicker Sicilia Pan Pizza. For a 13" × 18", Half Sheet Pan (12 Slices ).
Dough
5C Bread Flour
2T Sugar
1T Kosher Dalt
Thats all the ingredients? No yeast?
 

noboundaries

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You can always use parchment paper under the dough on the stone. I have a great tasting dough, but haven't mastered the whole peel to stone to peel process. Parchment paper solved the problem.

Build the pizza on the paper on the peel. Slides on and off the stone easily. Sure, the paper burns a little, but doesn't stick to the dough.
 

doughboyb

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It took me a couple years of trial and error to be able to grill the perfect pizza, and a lot of eye rolls from the wife, and one use of a fire extinguisher, but we won't go there. I use Jim Laheys no knead pizza dough along with semolina flour for peel dusting when tossing on the stone. Once you get your technique down it is so worth it, don't give up!
 

johnmeyer

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I've never had any problems with the dough sticking to the stone, either the one in the oven, or in my Weber gas grill pizza attachment, which I described here:

Review: Camp Chef Pizza Oven Accessory

I can give you two great recipes for pizza dough, but it might make more sense for you to post what you used, and to find out what temperature you used, as well as what you did to the stone.

As others have said, you must heat the stone for a LONG time for at least half an hour AFTER the oven has come up to temp. I use a really high temperature (525° F) and even higher in the oven on the Weber (close to 700° F). I always put a little cornmeal under the dough as I'm shaping it, and then also a little flour and cornmeal on the peel. The latter is more for making sure the dough slides off, but some of it does stick to the bottom of the pizza, and makes it less likely to stick to the stone.

As for the stone, I do NOT oil it or treat is in any way. I was it with a little water, no soap, and a simple Dobie-style scouring pad. I don't worry about stains or even a little bit of gunk that doesn't come off. It will eventually wear away.

If you don't get the stone really hot, things may stick. One of the great paradoxes of cooking is that food tends to stick to hot surfaces that are not hot enough. Very often you can get food to release simply by getting the cooking utensil hotter.

I'm making pizza right now using a Trader Joe's prefab that is already shaped and then frozen. Unlike their raw dough which you have to shape yourself, and which I love, this seems to be more like Bobili, which I don't dislike, but I wouldn't normally use. We'll see what sort of pizza it makes. I'm not expecting much.
 

johnmeyer

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Just finished eating the pizza. Since this isn't my post, I didn't think of taking pictures.

The pizza was substandard because of using the pre-fab Trader Joe's "dough." I definitely will not be doing that again. Their fresh dough that you roll out yourself is amazingly good and I highly recommend it, but this Boboli-style is not very good.

One interesting "mistake" is that the Costco Parmesan I used had begun to go moldy. I removed all the flakes that were obviously green and then used the rest. It had a very distinct blue cheese taste when I ate some of the flakes that didn't have any blue on them. The taste it imparted to the pizza was actually somewhat intriguing. Since I am hell-bent on making the ultimate "Italian-style" pizza, this has no interest to me, but if I were trying to create unique, unusual pizzas, this would definitely be something to try again.
 

chef jimmyj

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The Blue or Green portion of mold is essentially the Bloom or Fruiting portion that releases the Spores. The bulk of the mold is the Mycelium or Roots that are IN the cheese. The Mycelium can be anywhere from a 1/4 to 1" deep or more, depending on the density of the cheese. Cutting away the Bloom, still leaves most of the Mold and it's Flavor behind. You can try cutting away more to get to uninfected cheese but, eat it right away because spores left on your fingers and knife will Infect the remainder in 24 hours...JJ
 
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