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A Quick Buckboard Bacon With a New Idea.

disco

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I was getting low on bacon and fortune came to me! I found a cheap piece of pork shoulder.

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I won't go into a tutorial of how I make buckboard bacon as I am posting to show off a new knife and a great idea I had for developing pellicle. If you want to see how I make BB Bacon see my prior post https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t...ide-buckboard-and-canadian-back-bacon.297546/.

I cut the bone out of the roast with my new Global Boning knife. Way expensive but so sharp and well designed.

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I mixed up some brown sugar, kosher salt, and Prague Powder #1.

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Rubbed it onto the pork and put it in a bag to cure for 10 days.

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I took the pork out and put it in cold water for an hour changing the water once.

Here is my new idea came in. I usually put my bacon in the fridge overnight, uncovered, to develop pellicle. I don't know why I didn't think of it before. I have a dehydrator. Wouldn't it dry the surface faster? I put the pork in the dehydrator at the lowest temperature and it developed a great pellicle in less than an hour. Dang. Why didn't I think of this before.

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The bacon went into a 200 F Bradley P10 smoker to an internal temperature of 145 F.

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I took it out and let it sit in the fridge overnight.

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I sliced it up.

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Of course you have to try some.

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The Verdict

This is a project I've done many times and it makes a product I really love. The new knife is great and is worth its price. The dehydrator will be used from now on to develop pellicle!

Disco
 

MJB05615

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Great work! Looks like you saved a lot of time. That bacon looks delicious.
 

disco

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Great work! Looks like you saved a lot of time. That bacon looks delicious.
Thanks, Mike! I feel dumb not thinking of using the dehydrator before.
 

thirdeye

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Nice blade. I bet the dehydrator does dry the surface faster, but do you think the subtle heat also speeds up the equalization process, which after a 10 day cure is normally 12 to 20 hours?
 

disco

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I put it in the smoker after an hour in the dehydrator and it turned out great. I don't know what you mean by equalization after you stop curing it. The dry cure equalizes during the 10 day cure. The soaking is only to remove the surface cure. Letting it sit for another day wouldn't get you any more equalization of the cure.
 

thirdeye

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I put it in the smoker after an hour in the dehydrator and it turned out great. I don't know what you mean by equalization after you stop curing it. The dry cure equalizes during the 10 day cure. The soaking is only to remove the surface cure. Letting it sit for another day wouldn't get you any more equalization of the cure.
Maybe we're talking a difference of terms. After any meat undergoing curing for 2 or 3 weeks, comes out of a one or two hour surface soak-out step, there are still molecules of salt and water in motion within the meat..... and an overnight (or longer) rest in the fridge allows those molecules to settle down and equalize within the meat so the near surface saltiness is the same as the center. During that same period of time, a pellicle is formed.
 

disco

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Maybe we're talking a difference of terms. After any meat undergoing curing for 2 or 3 weeks, comes out of a one or two hour surface soak-out step, there are still molecules of salt and water in motion within the meat..... and an overnight (or longer) rest in the fridge allows those molecules to settle down and equalize within the meat so the near surface saltiness is the same as the center. During that same period of time, a pellicle is formed.
I would love to see the science on that. My understanding is that the travel through meat tissue of a cure or brine is 1/4 inch over 24 hours. That would mean a 1 hour soak in water would only affect a depth of 0.01 inches from the surface. Even that minimum amount would equalize over the time it is developing the pellicle, even for the shortened time in the dehydrator and, even if it didn't, would be imperceptible on smoking and consuming.

Regardless, the results were perfect so I will just have to say I don't buy your premise and we can agree to disagree.
 

Brokenhandle

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That's a good idea Disco! That's what is so nice about this forum...always new tricks or short cuts to learn. Might not be for everybody but if rushed on time I could see it coming in handy! Thanks for sharing. And nice knife too!

Ryan
 

disco

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That's a good idea Disco! That's what is so nice about this forum...always new tricks or short cuts to learn. Might not be for everybody but if rushed on time I could see it coming in handy! Thanks for sharing. And nice knife too!

Ryan
Thanks! I do like the new blade!
 

chopsaw

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Looks great . Good idea to dry the surface .
 

chef jimmyj

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The bacon looks great. Love the knife, I had a Global Chef's Knife until my oldest stole it. The dehydrator is a great idea and would be a quick fix for guys in high Humidity areas.

Stuff I've learned about Bacon...If Curing by Percentages, there is no soaking needed because outside in, your Salt level is equal and perfect to your taste. After all, YOU determined the amount that you wanted from the start. The concept of Equalization makes no sense. You have already determined the amount of time the cure needs to be distributed equally, lets say 14 days for a 2"/4cm slab of belly. You should not need to do more than rinse the surface, and even if you did soak a couple of hours...Do you really think you are going to Taste that the Outer 1mm Edge is less salty than the rest of the Slice you shoved in your mouth???...JJ 😊
 

crazymoon

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D, Good looking bacon and I like your dehydrator idea. Nice looking knife too !
 

JC in GB

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Nice looking bacon. Thanks for the dehydrator idea. I can understand an equalization period for meat that was brined for a short period of time in a high SAL pickle. In the case of an equilibrium type of cure, once equilibrium is reached it has equalized.

JC :emoji_cat:
 

smokerjim

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Thanks disco for sharing Disco and the bacon looks great
 

SmokinAl

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The bacon looks awesome Disco!
Nice knife too!
Al
 

TNJAKE

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Never had buckboard bacon. Gonna have to change that. Yours looks amazing
 

thirdeye

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I would love to see the science on that. My understanding is that the travel through meat tissue of a cure or brine is 1/4 inch over 24 hours. That would mean a 1 hour soak in water would only affect a depth of 0.01 inches from the surface. Even that minimum amount would equalize over the time it is developing the pellicle, even for the shortened time in the dehydrator and, even if it didn't, would be imperceptible on smoking and consuming.

Regardless, the results were perfect so I will just have to say I don't buy your premise and we can agree to disagree.
I would agree that salt and water diffusion is somewhat constant, and that a rinse/soak is needed to remove the cure still at the surface. I do see your points so we can agree to discuss, that's how we learn.

Stuff I've learned about Bacon...If Curing by Percentages, there is no soaking needed because outside in, your Salt level is equal and perfect to your taste. After all, YOU determined the amount that you wanted from the start. The concept of Equalization makes no sense. You have already determined the amount of time the cure needs to be distributed equally, lets say 14 days for a 2"/4cm slab of belly. You should not need to do more than rinse the surface, and even if you did soak a couple of hours...Do you really think you are going to Taste that the Outer 1mm Edge is less salty than the rest of the Slice you shoved in your mouth???...JJ 😊
I see your point too and using an equilibrium cure or curing brine does support your statements.

So, you guys both have me thinking, which is a good thing. :emoji_thumbsup: The way equalization was explained to me was that following a soak-out a magic switch is not flipped off to stop the process, and cured meats need time to settle down and be prepared for smoking. That explanation has stuck with me as a given. In my world, this was practiced on hams, bacon, various wild game corned roasts, as well as fish, obviously for different times.... and then much later in life when I had the chance to read actual books on the subject equalization was always called out when talking hams, and sometimes when talking bacon (some people go 2 or 3 days on bacon). Hams can equalize for weeks. I'm sure my Morton's Home Curing guide is the one with the diagrams showing the end of cure verses end of equalization. Anyways, both Grandfathers did not use equilibrium cures or curing brines. So JJ, snd Disco...this is a good point. Some things were the salt box method, and brining was always done in crocks. So the end of the process was timed pretty much to the day. Both old boys were pretty good about using the other proper terms... overhauling, pellicle, sweet pickle brine even 'salting' when making plain salt pork or salt beef. One Grandmother was the exception and instead of 'salting' she called it Koshering.

Slightly off track but check out this VIDEO around the 0:40 mark, He's calling that room an equalization cooler, but I have a feeling this step is more for flavor as this style of bacon is quite strong. It's like the country ham of bacon.
 

thirdeye

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Guys the Morton's equalization chart was a hand drawn sketch, this one is a little better...

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Bearcarver

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Looks Great Disco!!
And I love the Dehydrator idea---But I don't have one & no room for one. LOL
I have never had any of My TQ Dry-Cured Bacon come out too Salty, but I always soak mine for between 20 minutes & 1 hour, because the Salt on the outside just doesn't "Rinse Off" like some people Think.
And I "Like" Your BBB.

Bear
 

chef jimmyj

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There is a big difference between using a Calculator to determine the exact amount of Salt and Cure #1 or TQ you want in the meat by percent or Ppm. Weighing out in Grams, to 2 decimal places, exactly the amounts needed to reach the concentration you want. Applying all the cure, then allowing enough time for complete absorption and equalized distribution.

And...

The method of rubbing on however much of the Cure Mix, Salt, Sugar and Cure, the meat will hold.
Placing the meat on a Curing Table or in a Salt Box between handfulls or layers of Cure Mix.
Allowing the meat to sit to cure for a number of days, based on what you were taught or the Morton's Guide says should be good.
Then scraping and washing all the excess Cure Mix, not absorbed, off and resting another few days or weeks for Equalization.

I totally agree, in the latter case, where Bacon or Ham is being produced, by packing in cure. Time to allow the super concentration of Cure on the surface couple of inches to spread to the center or Equalize is needed for a uniform result.
We are getting the same result with different methods of Curing.
Thanks for bringing up this time trusted method...JJ
 

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