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Smoking a brisket flat at high heat

jeremymillrood

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Hey guys..Haven't been around for a while, and I'm about to do a brisket for my father-in-laws b-day. Last time I did one was 4 or 5 years ago, so to say I'm out of practice is an understatement..:emoji_laughing:

I've got a Weber bulet and want to try the high heat method, but I'm curious if it will work on a flat versus a whole packer..The packer is a lot of meat, I'd prefer to use a 7 or 8 lb flat instead, but I know that the higher heat might dry things out..

Looking for any experienced recommendations as well as suggestions for a simple rub.

Thanks.
 

SmokinAl

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I agree with the above, it’s hard enough to get a flat tender at 225. I think you would have a dried out mess at 300+, unless you inject it, pan it with some broth, and baste it often.
Al
 

noboundaries

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Brisket flats...oye vay. They have their place in the smoking world...attached to the point!

If I ever do a flat again, I'd smoke it no higher than 275F and wrap it at 175-185F IT with a cup of beef broth. Take it to a near probe tender state (little resistance), then move it wrapped to a 170F oven for about 4-5 hours. I did something similar with a full packer recently after reading about long rest times. Best packer I ever smoked. Sliceable flat that was melt in your mouth rich. The point with all the fat was almost too rich, like meat butter.
 

Chasdev

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I do flats hot and fast only these days, but of course I cook all my briskets and pieces hot and fast.
Low and slow allows more time for the meat to dry out, fast cooking creates a sealing layer on the exterior which helps to lock in the moisture.
My advice is 350 until 170 internal then wrap in foil with some cider vinegar/cider mix sprayed liberally into the foil before closing, then lower the temp to 300 and it's done somewhere around 200, I shoot for 205 myself and also use the jiggle test, which is to pick it up and shake it a little and see if it's floppy and springy like jello.
Total cook time a little more than 6 hours and the results will amaze.
 

Chasdev

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Right now a Masterbuilt gravity cooker rules my world.
I've owned an offset stick burner (which was just too much trouble overall for me, although the taste of the meat was the best) and I tried and still own a Kamado and a CampChef pellet spitter but nothing can replicate stick burner flavor EXCEPT the Masterbuilt.
I use both lump and briquette charcoal and toss in a good deal of post oak and pecan to create the smoke.
Masterbuilt's have superior temp control so it's set it and forget it and that aspect changed my world cooker wise and still allows proper wood smoked meat.
 
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Hands down, 50/50 salt and pepper. Use kosher salt and a little coarser pepper, not the finely ground stuff. Simple is the way to go!
 

mike243

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Cook till 160, vac seal it and SV 204 for 3 or 6 hours, it will make you wonder
 

SmokingUPnorth

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My first one I got from GFS said “packer while” and when I opened it it was two flats. I was kinda mad. It I cooked one between 250 and 270 pretty quick and it turned out horrible. Was really dry. So I wouldn’t suggest it either. I have the other one I’m gonna try this weekend and running it right at 220-225. Good luck
 

jeremymillrood

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So now I'm on the fence..part of me wants to err of the safe side and get the whole packer, but I keep going back to the fact that's it's just too much meat..

I'm going to try to get a 6 or 7 lb flat, will inject it, and then as suggested do high heat until 170, then foil it for the rest of the cook...

Since I'm working with the weber bullet, should I wait until the temps stabilize or just put the meat on as soon as all the fuel catches??

What about the water pan?? I was planning to foil it and then have something in there to catch the dripping, but no water..

Thanks again.
 

Chasdev

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Weber bullet is direct over the coals, right?
If so you need a water pan to act as a deflector IMHO but I am not a Weber driver so I don't know what gear it has or how it's arranged.
FWIW, a water pan will slow or alter the meat's rate of evaporative cooling so the stall time will change and probably take longer than without a water pan.
Also running 350 with water is going to require lots of water pan watching as it boils off.

Lastly you want to preheat the cooker no matter what you are using.
 

jeremymillrood

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Correct, the weber bullet cooks direct over the coals with only the water pan in between..

Instructions I've read for the high heat cook suggest, no water, foiling the pan , then suspending a 2nd layer of foil to catch drippings and prevent them from burning..
 

JC in GB

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Jeff's Texas rub is great on beef. I am wary of high and fast cooks as I don't feel they impart the same smokiness to the finished product.

Salt and pepper is my good luck with your cook. Post pics...

JC :emoji_cat:
 

tallbm

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I don't do brisket flats alone BUT I do chuck roast (when its cheaper than brisket) and our cuts are often big and long just like a brisket flat without the top layer of fat.

I firmly believe that the magic comes in wrapping the chuck (flat in your case) in foil while splashing some liquid in with it (I use left over wine or some beer) at a meat IT of about 185-190F.

This allows the brisket to get good flavor, color, and some bark while coming out tender and not dry! Brisket flats and chucks will wanna dry out on you being so flat and not full of fat.

Again I think that is the magic needed to get what you are wanting without it turning into pot roast or going some other unintended direction.
I smoke in my MES at 275F so I think you may be able to go any temp you want as long as you understand the fundamental issue of that cut of meat just wanting to dry out on you, hence the splash and wrap at 185-190F.

I hope this info helps and I look forward to seeing what you make :)
 

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