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PASTRAMI FROM SCRATCH ON THE LANG

Discussion in 'Beef' started by SmokinAl, Jul 8, 2016.

  1. SmokinAl

    SmokinAl SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    You pour the soup in the bottom of the pan & put the brisket in it.

    The final IT was 195 on this one, but sometimes they take a little higher temp to get done.

    When you get up to 195, check it with a toothpick or wooden skewer.

    It should go in with little to no resistance, if it's not sliding in real easy then let it cook a little longer until it's probe tender.

    Good luck & let me know how it turns out!

    Al
     
  2. gphil

    gphil Newbie

    Thanks - will do..
     
  3. Scott "Stu" Stewart

    Scott "Stu" Stewart Fire Starter SMF Premier Member

    Wow, just wow...
     
  4. SmokinAl

    SmokinAl SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    Thank you Stu!
    It is much appreciated!
    Al
     
  5. I know this is an old thread, but I'm trying your brisket pastrami recipe. Just seasoned and sealed it up. Appreciate the Q View.
     
  6. SmokinAl

    SmokinAl SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    No problem!
    Let us know how it turns out!!
    Al
     
  7. fajitapot

    fajitapot Fire Starter

    Al as a native New Yorker I've studied your recipes for Lox and Pastrami carefully. Although I've always brined my briskets, your equalization dry cure makes sense to me (for the same reason I prefer my bacon dry-cured) and I'll be trying that next time. The question I'm considering now though is final internal temperature during the smoke, and post smoke treatment. I've always smoked to 150°, then sliced (cold) with ease on my slicer. It is common for folks to smoke to the same temperature and then steam to ± 200°. It is also now common for folks to smoke to 150° or so and then cook it in a water bath at 150° for 48 hours.

    So my question to you is, have you experimented much with these variables and do you have any insights into the pros can cons of the various post cure treatments? It feels like I'll be splitting my next brisket into thirds and trying all three methods simultaneously, but I'm curious if you (or anyone else here) has already done this.

    Also, fun fact: traditionally pastrami was made with Navel and not Brisket, but this cut must be sourced from whole animal butchers and is otherwise basically impossible to find.
     
  8. SmokinAl

    SmokinAl SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    The pastrami I do now is the same cure method, then smoked to an IT of 150, then into a SV for 24 hours at 155. It has a much better texture than just smoking it all the way. I just did an eye of round pastrami & used the same method. Only I just smoked it to 130 IT then into the SV for 20 hours at 132.
    Good luck with yours.
    Al
     
    fajitapot likes this.
  9. Bernzy78

    Bernzy78 Newbie

    How did the eye of round turn out? for the eye of round is it also an equilibrium brine? I followed the link in your post above and you use a gradient brine (soaking in a bag). I hope I got the brine terms correct.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2019
  10. SmokinAl

    SmokinAl SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    The eye turned out very good.
    I use Pops brine & inject the middle with the brine, then into a bag & into the fridge.
    Here is one I did a while back.
    https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/eye-of-round-pastrami-mucho-q-view.242696/
    But we like them better when you finish them with a SV, instead of smoking them all the way!
    Al