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making a dry sausage with a semi dry recipe

wyfly

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Joined Nov 20, 2020
After reading about AJ's dry salami I am wondering if I can modify my favorite semi dry 10lb recipe which calls for 11/2 cups dry buttermilk and 2 tsp cure#1 to 1tsp cure#1 + 1tsp cure# then drying chamber till it achieves necessary weight loss?
 

dernektambura

Smoking Fanatic
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difference will be in the fact that cure #2 has extra part of about 1% of nitrate mixed in... nitrate will break down in to nitrite over the period of time... think of it as a time delay backup protection...
 

wyfly

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Joined Nov 20, 2020
difference will be in the fact that cure #2 has extra part of about 1% of nitrate mixed in... nitrate will break down in to nitrite over the period of time... think of it as a time delay backup protection...
Thanks for the reply. Would I be ahead using a mixture or just straight #2?
 

dernektambura

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You will not be ahead by using mixture of cure #1 and #2... just opposite....
Think of cure #1 as protection on "short run" for a product that you will cook, pan fry or bbq...
Cure #2 is protection on "long run" for a product that will be shelf stable for long period of time and which can be consumed as "raw"... panchetta, salami, prosciutto, hungarian or italian dry sausages... spanish chorizo etc...
 

bill ace 350

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Joined Dec 28, 2013
The recipe i saw for AJs used seasoning and sodium nitrate and nitrite.

Tenderquick contains sodium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

If only you could control the salt and sugar content of TQ....

Great stuff. Lots of people don't seem to think it's a "real" cure, but it is.

It is good stuff, i use it for bacon, Canadian bacon, dried beef and summer sausage.

I used it to make shelf stable deer salami.

The salt and sugar levels in my opinion, can sometimes be limiting.
 
Last edited:

wyfly

Newbie
25
4
Joined Nov 20, 2020
You will not be ahead by using mixture of cure #1 and #2... just opposite....
Think of cure #1 as protection on "short run" for a product that you will cook, pan fry or bbq...
Cure #2 is protection on "long run" for a product that will be shelf stable for long period of time and which can be consumed as "raw"... panchetta, salami, prosciutto, hungarian or italian dry sausages... spanish chorizo etc...
Just what I was wanting to know, thank you much! As a newbie to this site I am starting to love it, thanks again.
The recipe i saw for AJs used seasoning and sodium nitrate and nitrite.

Tenderquick contains sodium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

If only you could control the salt and sugar content of TQ....

Great stuff. Lots of people don't seem to think it's a "real" cure, but it is.

It is good stuff, i use it for bacon, Canadian bacon, dried beef and summer sausage.

I used it to make shelf stable deer salami.

The salt and sugar levels in my opinion, can sometimes be limiting.
Thanks for the reply,I use a lot of tenderquick myself, wish I knew the salt sugar ratio of TQ.
 

SmokinEdge

Master of the Pit
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After reading about AJ's dry salami I am wondering if I can modify my favorite semi dry 10lb recipe which calls for 11/2 cups dry buttermilk and 2 tsp cure#1 to 1tsp cure#1 + 1tsp cure# then drying chamber till it achieves necessary weight loss?
If not fermenting you’re sausage I see no reason for cure #2 ( which is 6.25% sodium nitrite about 1% sodium nitrate and about 92.75% salt). Nothing at all wrong with drying down sausages made with cure #1. I often wrap them in brown paper and leave them in the fridge to dry down.
 

wyfly

Newbie
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Joined Nov 20, 2020
If not fermenting you’re sausage I see no reason for cure #2 ( which is 6.25% sodium nitrite about 1% sodium nitrate and about 92.75% salt). Nothing at all wrong with drying down sausages made with cure #1. I often wrap them in brown paper and leave them in the fridge to dry down.
thanks i'll be experimenting
 

SWFLsmkr1

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Dont guess when using cure

Be safe

CURES - Cures are used in sausage products for color and flavor development as well as retarding the development of bacteria in the low temperature environment of smoked meats. Salt and sugar both cure meat by osmosis. In addition to drawing the water from the food, they dehydrate and kill the bacteria that make food spoil. In general, though, use of the word "cure" refers to processing the meat with either sodium nitrite or sodium nitrate.

The primary and most important reason to use cures is to prevent BOTULISM POISONING (Food poisoning). It is very important that any kind of meat or sausage that will be cooked and smoked at low temperature be cured. To trigger botulism poisoning, the requirements are quite simple - lack of oxygen, the presence of moisture, and temperatures in range of 40-140° F. When smoking meats, the heat and smoke eliminates the oxygen. The meats have moisture and are traditionally smoked and cooked in the low ranges of 90 to 185° F. As you can see, these are ideal conditions for food poisoning if you don't use cures. There are two types of commercially used cures.

Prague Powder #1
Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure. Cures are used to prevent meats from spoiling when being cooked or smoked at low temperatures (under 200 degrees F). This cure is 1 part sodium nitrite (6.25%) and 16 parts salt (93.75%) and are combined and crystallized to assure even distribution. As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to ‘gas out’ at about 130 degrees F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20% of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. 4 ounces of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 100 lbs of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 level tsp per 5 lbs of meat. Mix with cold water, then mix into meat like you would mix seasonings into meat.

Prague Powder #2
Used to dry-cure products. Prague powder #2 is a mixture of 1 part sodium nitrite, .64 parts sodium nitrate and 16 parts salt. (1 oz. of sodium nitrite with .64 oz. of sodium nitrate to each lb. of salt.) It is primarily used in dry-curing Use with products that do not require cooking, smoking, or refrigeration. This cure, which is sodium nitrate, acts like a time release, slowly breaking down into sodium nitrite, then into nitric oxide. This allows you to dry cure products that take much longer to cure. A cure with sodium nitrite would dissipate too quickly. Use 1 oz. of cure for 25 lbs. of meat or 1 level teaspoon of cure for 5 lbs. of meat when mixing with meat. When using a cure in a brine solution, follow a recipe
 

daveomak

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Joined Nov 12, 2010
Just what I was wanting to know, thank you much! As a newbie to this site I am starting to love it, thanks again.

Thanks for the reply,I use a lot of tenderquick myself, wish I knew the salt sugar ratio of TQ.
~95% salt
0.5% nitrate
0.5% nitrite
and some other stuff...
1606356411977.png
MORTON tender quick.jpg
 

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