Salami Krakowskie (Polish Dry Salami)

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Just to be clear , I'm not saying Marianski is wrong . I don't consider that to be an error . I would never match wits with that guy .

My point was sometimes things get crossed up or lost in translation .
 
Just to be clear , I'm not saying Marianski is wrong . I don't consider that to be an error . I would never match wits with that guy .

My point was sometimes things get crossed up or lost in translation .
That's exactly what happened. He's not wrong, it's just there's an error on the website. When putting the recipe on the website, an error occurred that caused the following smoking details to be lost. Fortunately, I have the book, so I know what those details are:

5. Smoking:
A. Smoke/dry with thin smoke for 20-40 min at 112-122F (45-50C)
B. Smoke with thick smoke for 90-140min at 104-122F (40-50C)
C. Bake with thin smoke for 70-100 min at 167-194F (75-90C)
6. Hang in a shaded well ventilated area at 10-12C, 80-85% RH for 5-6 weeks until salami develops white mold on the outside.
 
What page in the green book is the recipe you are following?
Page 270 in the green book is the cooked / smoked version .
Salami-Polish
( Salami Krakowskie )

Doesn't show the dry cured one that I see . Recipe index is on 651 .

The green book section is Fermented . Not fermented and dry like the website .
Might not be in the book because it doesn't use a starter .
 
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Thanks Rich...

Might not be in the book because it doesn't use a starter .
This is where it gets confusing because Marainski does have some old school recipes in there too...how they did it before the regulations became laxed for commercialization of the meat industry there. Quality suffered greatly after this change.
 
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Page 270 in the green book is the cooked / smoked version .
Salami-Polish
( Salami Krakowskie )

Exactly, the recipe under "Chapter 14 - Cooked Sausages" is what I'm following here. There's only one recipe with "Krakowskie" in the name in the book, and that's the one I'm following.

In any case, it sounds like we're on the same page with the recipe (the one on page 270, which corresponds to the steps I described in my first post).
 
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Quality suffered greatly after this change.
For sure . Some of the stuff he does , there a reason for it that not commonly know . Just like you're saying .

I started to pay attention to his cooking / smoking schedule . Makes a difference .

Another thing is curing the meat chunks 3 days before grinding . Been doing that when I have the time , and it's a HUGE quality improvement .
 
Another thing is curing the meat chunks 3 days before grinding . Been doing that when I have the time , and it's a HUGE quality improvement .
Yep. curing firms up the meat and allows for colder temps. when chilling (salt water in the meat freezes at a lower temperature). Also enhances protein extraction using the grinder during grinding. We do this on our very large runs of cajun smoke sausage where we will do 200-300# at a time. Saves a ton of mixing time.....
 
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Thanks. Found it in the book. Now I'm really curious. Never seen that type of process before. Got me thinking now..........Hmmmm...
I had some Umai salami one time that didn't want to get past 30% . I pulled it from the Umai casing , put it in a net and hot smoked it to 152 . I have to say it was really good .
The salt taste was increased from the fat rendered , but it actually added to it for me .
 
Thanks Rich...

This is where it gets confusing because Marainski does have some old school recipes in there too...how they did it before the regulations became laxed for commercialization of the meat industry there. Quality suffered greatly after this change.

When I was reading through the recipes, I like how Marianski includes both his modern version and the old school steps (disclaimed with words like "originally" or "in the past"). I wonder if when you see something like "in the past" before a set of steps, he's sort of saying "these steps are old, do at your own risk, and they may not pass regulations, etc..."
 
I had some Umai salami one time that didn't want to get past 30% . I pulled it from the Umai casing , put it in a net and hot smoked it to 152 . I have to say it was really good .
The salt taste was increased from the fat rendered , but it actually added to it for me .

That's good to know! I'm really interested in steps like that, and may come in useful down the road. Thanks!
 
For sure . Some of the stuff he does , there a reason for it that not commonly know . Just like you're saying .

I started to pay attention to his cooking / smoking schedule . Makes a difference .

Another thing is curing the meat chunks 3 days before grinding . Been doing that when I have the time , and it's a HUGE quality improvement .

So that's definitely a data point in favor of following the recipe verbatim and doing a 10-14 day hold before stuffing. These minor details may make all the difference.
 
Yep. curing firms up the meat and allows for colder temps. when chilling (salt water in the meat freezes at a lower temperature). Also enhances protein extraction using the grinder during grinding. We do this on our very large runs of cajun smoke sausage where we will do 200-300# at a time. Saves a ton of mixing time.....

Great tip! You think this is a good step to do in general? Maybe I should do this for every sausage I make...
 
Great tip! You think this is a good step to do in general? Maybe I should do this for every sausage I make...
Can't hurt to add salt and cure to the chinks, and let it cure in refrigerator 4-5 days. I would not add the spices though. Add those either prior to grinding or when mixing for protein extraction.
 
Can't hurt to add salt and cure to the chinks, and let it cure in refrigerator 4-5 days. I would not add the spices though. Add those either prior to grinding or when mixing for protein extraction.
Will do! Thanks for the tip! I'll update the original steps accordingly.

What do you think about the 4mm grind? I was thinking that might be a bit aggressive, as I usually like it coarser, but maybe for salami finer is better.
 
Finer will slow moisture loss, which in an uncooked salami increases flavor development. But since your's is cooked, slightly larger grind will probably help, both in drying and lessening grease out.
 
Finer will slow moisture loss, which in an uncooked salami increases flavor development. But since your's is cooked, slightly larger grind will probably help, both in drying and lessening grease out.
Thanks! I've got a plate with 5mm holes, so I'll plan on using that. (Unless you think 8mm is better. That's my next size up).

Also, interesting -- There's more info in the paper version of the book! Glad I bought it. Apparently this is also called "Koch Salami"
 
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