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First time to ask.

mycle20

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My mum bought this type of meat thermometer and we tried with the average size of roasted whole chicken, Do you think it will work accurately with large roasted turkey?



Thank a lot
 

pineywoods

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It should work fine but you need to test the accuracy. Put a pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil then carefully maybe wearing a glove put the probe into the water to see if it reads 212 if not adjust it and try again. Once you know it's accurate just test it once in awhile to make sure it still is.
 

mycle20

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It should work fine but you need to test the accuracy. Put a pot of water on the stove and bring it to a boil then carefully maybe wearing a glove put the probe into the water to see if it reads 212 if not adjust it and try again. Once you know it's accurate just test it once in awhile to make sure it still is.
Thank you so much, appreciated your reply.
 

Steve H

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When I calibrate/check for operation of RTD's, thermocouple ,etc. I use three temp. set points. Ice bath for 32 degrees. 100 degrees, then 212 degrees. A thermocoupling can be dead on at 212. but be off at a lower temp. Which is why you should take three readings to be sure. Though this is one of the things I do at work. Not sure if it is needed for home use.
 

mycle20

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When I calibrate/check for operation of RTD's, thermocouple ,etc. I use three temp. set points. Ice bath for 32 degrees. 100 degrees, then 212 degrees. A thermocoupling can be dead on at 212. but be off at a lower temp. Which is why you should take three readings to be sure. Though this is one of the things I do at work. Not sure if it is needed for home use.
Cool, Thank you so much for a good and informative opinion.
 

HalfSmoked

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Welcome to the forum glad to have you on board. As you can see if you ask the help is here.

Warren
 

bassman

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Don't forget to take into account your altitude when using the boiling water technique.

The Boiling Point of Water at Various Altitudes
By Bethany Moncel

Updated 11/12/18


Indi Samarajiva/Flickr/CC 2.0
One of the most significant changes that occur in high altitude areas concerning cooking is the boiling point of water. As the altitude increases, the atmospheric pressure pushing down on water decreases, which allows the water to boil at lower temperatures.


A lower boiling point means that food cooks at a lower temperature, despite the fact that the water is boiling. It is important to recognize just how much the temperature of boiling water is reduced as the altitude increases.


With nearly one-third of U.S. households residing in high altitude locations, this simple piece of science can greatly affect your cooking. Check your altitude against this chart to see if you are cooking at lower temperatures than expected.


Boiling Point of Water at Different Altitudes
Altitude ft. (meters) Boiling Point - Fahrenheit Boiling Point - Celsius
0 ft. (0 m.) 212 ºF 100 ºC
500 ft. (152 m.) 211 ºF 99.5 ºC
1000 ft (305 m.) 210 ºF 99 ºC
1500 ft. (457 m.) 209 ºF 98.5 ºC
2000 ft. (610 m.) 208 ºF 98 ºC
2500 ft. (762 m.) 207 ºF 97.5 ºC
3000 ft (914 m.) 206 ºF 97 ºC
3500 ft. (1067 m.) 205.5 ºF 96 ºC
4000 ft. (1219 m.) 204 ºF 95.5 ºC
4500 ft. (1372 m.) 203.5 ºF 95 ºC
5000 ft. (1524 m.) 202 ºF 94.5 ºC
5500 ft. (1676 m.) 201.5 ºF 94 ºC
6000 ft. (1829 m.) 200.5 ºF 93.5 ºC
6500 ft. (1981 m.) 199.5 ºF 93 ºC
7000 ft. (2134 m.) 198.5 ºF 92.5 ºC
7500 ft. (2286 m.) 198 ºF 92 ºC
8000 ft. (2438 m.) 197 ºF 91.5 ºC
8500 ft. (2591 m.) 196 ºF 91 ºC
9000 ft. (2743 m.) 195 ºF 90.5 ºC
9500 ft. (2895 m.) 194 ºF 90 ºC
10000 ft. (3048 m.) 193 ºF 89.5 ºC

Temperatures have been rounded to the half degree.


How to Find Your Altitude
It is easier than ever to find your altitude online or with your cell phone. You can simply ask your voice assistant, "What's my altitude?" and get a quick answer. If you are using a desktop computer, you can do a web search of your location for the altitude. If you have a GPS, it will also tell you your altitude.
 

Steve H

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Good point. I forgot to include that.
 

mycle20

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Don't forget to take into account your altitude when using the boiling water technique.

The Boiling Point of Water at Various Altitudes
By Bethany Moncel

Updated 11/12/18


Indi Samarajiva/Flickr/CC 2.0
One of the most significant changes that occur in high altitude areas concerning cooking is the boiling point of water. As the altitude increases, the atmospheric pressure pushing down on water decreases, which allows the water to boil at lower temperatures.


A lower boiling point means that food cooks at a lower temperature, despite the fact that the water is boiling. It is important to recognize just how much the temperature of boiling water is reduced as the altitude increases.


With nearly one-third of U.S. households residing in high altitude locations, this simple piece of science can greatly affect your cooking. Check your altitude against this chart to see if you are cooking at lower temperatures than expected.


Boiling Point of Water at Different Altitudes
Altitude ft. (meters) Boiling Point - Fahrenheit Boiling Point - Celsius
0 ft. (0 m.) 212 ºF 100 ºC
500 ft. (152 m.) 211 ºF 99.5 ºC
1000 ft (305 m.) 210 ºF 99 ºC
1500 ft. (457 m.) 209 ºF 98.5 ºC
2000 ft. (610 m.) 208 ºF 98 ºC
2500 ft. (762 m.) 207 ºF 97.5 ºC
3000 ft (914 m.) 206 ºF 97 ºC
3500 ft. (1067 m.) 205.5 ºF 96 ºC
4000 ft. (1219 m.) 204 ºF 95.5 ºC
4500 ft. (1372 m.) 203.5 ºF 95 ºC
5000 ft. (1524 m.) 202 ºF 94.5 ºC
5500 ft. (1676 m.) 201.5 ºF 94 ºC
6000 ft. (1829 m.) 200.5 ºF 93.5 ºC
6500 ft. (1981 m.) 199.5 ºF 93 ºC
7000 ft. (2134 m.) 198.5 ºF 92.5 ºC
7500 ft. (2286 m.) 198 ºF 92 ºC
8000 ft. (2438 m.) 197 ºF 91.5 ºC
8500 ft. (2591 m.) 196 ºF 91 ºC
9000 ft. (2743 m.) 195 ºF 90.5 ºC
9500 ft. (2895 m.) 194 ºF 90 ºC
10000 ft. (3048 m.) 193 ºF 89.5 ºC

Temperatures have been rounded to the half degree.


How to Find Your Altitude
It is easier than ever to find your altitude online or with your cell phone. You can simply ask your voice assistant, "What's my altitude?" and get a quick answer. If you are using a desktop computer, you can do a web search of your location for the altitude. If you have a GPS, it will also tell you your altitude.
This is great, thanks a lot.
 

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