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Dry vs Wet brine

smokincoalkracker

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Can anyone tell me the advantage or reason to use one method vs. the other when it comes to brining trout/ salmon? I normally use the dry method but Im open to new better ideas.
Thank.
 

smokeymose

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I've always used wet because of the simplicity but I've never done fish. I think if you've had good luck with the dry stick with it.
 

indaswamp

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I have never cured salmon, but generally speaking wet brine keeps the meat moist, while dry brine will allow moisture to drain out of the meat.
 

kilo charlie

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I bet an experiment with Pops Brine on some fish would be good.. something I have never personally done though.
 

bill1

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I have NO experience with fish, but I'd think it would fall apart in a wet brine. Would love to be educated otherwise.
 

disco

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What is your favourite colour? It is really a matter of taste and what kind of fish you are looking to make. If you are making Lox, dry is the norm but I have had great cold smoke wet brined salmon. If you are hot smoking salmon, I find wet brine gives a nice distribution of the flavours while dry brining gives a texture I prefer. But it is really subjective and I suggest you try both to find the one you like.
 

tallbm

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Can anyone tell me the advantage or reason to use one method vs. the other when it comes to brining trout/ salmon? I normally use the dry method but Im open to new better ideas.
Thank.
I don't cook tons of different fish and different styles but in general the only reason to brine would be if you want a simple marinade of flavor and in that case like 2hours aught to do the trick.

The other case is if you are curing (using Cure #1) for salmon lox or salmon jerky/nuggets then brining/curing would be needed.

I have only ever done dry brining and curing for the salmon lox and jerky cases.
I've marinated for like max 2 hours then grilled.

All other cases I simply season and immediately cook.

Out of curiosity, what is the reason you are looking to brine some fish? :)
 

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