Cure #1 questions

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domvoc

Newbie
Original poster
Mar 6, 2017
23
10
Webster, Texas
Hi. So far, I have only used premade spice mixes for my jerky. Im going to be trying out some homemade mixes soon. I was wondering what brand(s) of cure #1 you guys suggest? Is there a difference between them? Why are some twice as expensive as others? Do you have a preference? And why?
Thanks.
--Dominick
 
Beware of buying cure from Ebay unless it is from a reputable company. I have bought cure from Ebay in the past and have had it lab tested only to find that what I was sent was not actually what it was supposed to be. "Kitchen table" suppliers that sell the low price cures may not take as much care in ensuring that the cure they sell is completely mixed in bulk before it gets packaged leading to inconsistent packs being sent out. One pack of Cure#1 I bought didn't actually have any Nitrite in it - the person selling it has used Nitrate by mistake.
 
In my opinion is best to stick with specialized businesses when buying cures. Sausagemaker mentioned above is one, Butcher Packer is another one ($3.50 for a lb). Butcher's Pantry - $3.75lb.
 
Tropics, thanks. I actually bought my stainless steel jerky board and knife from them. It looks like a pound of cure from them comesbout to about $14 with shipping. Not really a problem, but are the other two links I sent you the exact same product?
 
Atomicsmoke, I missed your post earlier. Thanks for the info. Butcher's Pantry seems to be about the same as a store for 1 pound, after shipping. But Butcher Packer seems to be $1/oz, unless I am looking at the wrong site.
--Dom
 
The Hosier Hill is what I typically buy. Mainly because we are prime members and I like the free shipping. Never had an issue with it.
 
Atomicsmoke, I missed your post earlier. Thanks for the info. Butcher's Pantry seems to be about the same as a store for 1 pound, after shipping. But Butcher Packer seems to be $1/oz, unless I am looking at the wrong site.
--Dom

Don't know where you went but Butcher Packers sells by the lb too.
 
 All the same, 6.25% sodium nitrite 93.75% salt plus maybe anticaking ingredients and pink color.

I know cure #1 should just be Salt and Sodium Nitrite, but are these added ingredients still ok?
Salt, Sodium Nitrite (6.25%), Propylene Glycol and Sodium Bicarbonate as Processing Aids and FD&C Red #3

Thanks.
 
Last edited:
I know cure #1 should just be Salt and Sodium Nitrite, but are these added ingredients still ok?
Salt, Sodium Nitrite (6.25%), Propylene Glycol and Sodium Bicarbonate as Processing Aids and FD&C Red #3

Thanks.
They are fine. Those are the anti-caking and coloring ingredients I mentioned in my post and a buffer to keep them mixed properly, not settle out of proportion.

Chuck
 
I never had any cure 1 that stated sodium bicarbonate in it? But maybe some makers add it.....Hmmmmm

Prague Powder #1

Also called Insta-Cure and Modern Cure. Cures are used to prevent meats from spoiling when being cooked or smoked at low temperatures (under 200 degrees F). This cure is 1 part sodium nitrite (6.25%) and 16 parts salt (93.75%) and are combined and crystallized to assure even distribution. As the meat temperate rises during processing, the sodium nitrite changes to nitric oxide and starts to ‘gas out’ at about 130 degrees F. After the smoking /cooking process is complete only about 10-20% of the original nitrite remains. As the product is stored and later reheated for consumption, the decline of nitrite continues. 4 ounces of Prague powder #1 is required to cure 100 lbs of meat. A more typical measurement for home use is 1 level tsp per 5 lbs of meat. Mix with cold water, then mix into meat like you would mix seasonings into meat.
 
They are not included in the UK Cures either. It does seem to go a bit against the grain as we avoid table salts with added iodine and ant-caking agents in favour of Kosher salt. In the grand scheme of things though I would very much doubt that the amounts present in that cure will have any noticeable effect.
 
I know cure #1 should just be Salt and Sodium Nitrite, but are these added ingredients still ok?
Salt, Sodium Nitrite (6.25%), Propylene Glycol and Sodium Bicarbonate as Processing Aids and FD&C Red #3

Thanks.
I know that the Hoosier Hills I use contains none of that. 6.75% sodium nitrate, 93.75% salt that's it.


Propylene Glycol is used in many applications in the food manufacturing industry.  It is used in soda pop, ice cream, liquid sweeteners.

Its other uses are in the production of polyester resins, pharmaceuticals, aircraft de-icer and rv antifreeze and plumbing winterizer. Newer use now is in e-cigarettes and vaporizers

Sodium Bicarbonate is baking soda - which could be used to help with anti-caking
 
 
I know that the Hoosier Hills I use contains none of that. 6.75% sodium nitrate, 93.75% salt that's it.


Propylene Glycol is used in many applications in the food manufacturing industry.  It is used in soda pop, ice cream, liquid sweeteners.

Its other uses are in the production of polyester resins, pharmaceuticals, aircraft de-icer and rv antifreeze and plumbing winterizer. Newer use now is in e-cigarettes and vaporizers

Sodium Bicarbonate is baking soda - which could be used to help with anti-caking
 It must have something to make it pink. I think they didn't include it on the label.

Chuck
 
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