Blueberry Wine Help

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BrianGSDTexoma

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Aug 1, 2018
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Got my Mustang Grape Wine bottled this morning. Not sure if going to be any good or not. Will check in 6 months. I love Horton Tower Series Blueberry wine. It is seasonal and $15 a bottle when you can find. I thinking about trying to make some. Walmart has 3 lb bags for $7. I thinking 4 lbs a gallon and some where around 2 lb sugar per gallon. Thought about using Steam Juicer but probably better off just smashing them and using brew in a bag in fermenter. Than pull out and let drain after fermentation done. Any wine makers that can help me? Was going to do 5 gallons but probably just do 3 in case it sucks.
 
I would recommend using smashed whole fruit. The skins add lots of character and tannin.

Your sugar seems pretty high though.
 
I would recommend using smashed whole fruit. The skins add lots of character and tannin.

Your sugar seems pretty high though.
I used 12 lbs blueberries. Smashed with potato masher in sanitized bucket than poured into brew bag and added 3 gallons water. Took little over 6 lbs sugar to bring to 1.090. Ended up with a little over 4 gallons after the juice came out during fermentation. Was .990 when transferred to secondary. It is now about ready to bottle. Really would of liked to stop above 1.000 but was not sure how to go about it s it was still very active. Going to bottle in swing top beer bottles at let age a year. Will just sweeten when ready to drink. Would like to do some more fruit wine but until I know if this is going to turn out I will just wait until able to taste wine. Tasted incredible when it was about 1.010 but now is very dry. I will need to account for juice in the future if do again. My buddy has been using my steam juicer to make his. Will see how his turns out as that is so much easier. Can always add the pulp left over to the fermenter in a bag.
 
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I used 12 lbs blueberries. Smashed with potato masher in sanitized bucket than poured into brew bag and added 3 gallons water. Took little over 6 lbs sugar to bring to 1.090. Ended up with a little over 4 gallons after the juice came out during fermentation. Was .990 when transferred to secondary. It is now about ready to bottle. Really would of liked to stop above 1.000 but was not sure how to go about it s it was still very active. Going to bottle in swing top beer bottles at let age a year. Will just sweeten when ready to drink. Would like to do some more fruit wine but until I know if this is going to turn out I will just wait until able to taste wine. Tasted incredible when it was about 1.010 but now is very dry. I will need to account for juice in the future if do again. My buddy has been using my steam juicer to make his. Will see how his turns out as that is so much easier. Can always add the pulp left over to the fermenter in a bag.
I was hoping I saved what I need. Really bad about keeping records. Anyhow, I opened a bottle today. I knew was going to be very dry so made a simple syrup. Added 1 tsp to glass and poured wine. For 3 months old it very good! Now that I know my process works going to do a strawberry. Now gonna need more bottles.

20220318_134915.jpg
 
I was hoping I saved what I need. Really bad about keeping records. Anyhow, I opened a bottle today. I knew was going to be very dry so made a simple syrup. Added 1 tsp to glass and poured wine. For 3 months old it very good! Now that I know my process works going to do a strawberry. Now gonna need more bottles.

View attachment 529365

Wow man that is too cool!!! I've never brewed and any kind of alcohol these days gives me what feels like a mild case of the flu (I've thoroughly tried all alcohol options haha).
I only drink about 5-6 times a year when can deal with the consequences and not miss work.

I was fortunate enough to be able to go to college and one time I DID take a course called "Beverage Survey". It was a class where we learned all kinds of things about alcoholic beverages and mostly wine. It was for Hospitality Management majors but I took it as a fun elective. It was a fun and amazing class I learned a lot from, so I can follow along with this very well and enjoy the postings and process. Please keep reporting back on it! :D
 
a good option for back-sweetening country wine is to save enough must to bring it up to about 1010. It helps bring back some bright fresh aroma and flavor that I find country wines to be lacking in. I haven't been particularly happy with any country wines when completely dry.
 
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Have to talk to a friend of mine, he makes alot of wine...usually ends up about 18 % abv so it's not your ordinary wine but sure is good! I'll look to see if I still have pics of our supply. We usually help bottle and have had apple, blueberry, strawberry, rhubarb, red grape, white grape, gooseberry, mulberry, cooked cranberry, crushed cranberry, cherry and mead...but not a mead fan...too dry for us.

Ryan
 
Speaking of that, I just remembered he made us some grape wine that we haven't picked up yet! But did find thus pic

20200806_163739.jpg


Only problem I have us wine rack is half empty! :emoji_blush:

Ryan
 
Have to talk to a friend of mine, he makes alot of wine...usually ends up about 18 % abv so it's not your ordinary wine but sure is good! I'll look to see if I still have pics of our supply. We usually help bottle and have had apple, blueberry, strawberry, rhubarb, red grape, white grape, gooseberry, mulberry, cooked cranberry, crushed cranberry, cherry and mead...but not a mead fan...too dry for us.

Ryan

You can make mead as sweet as you want - as sweet as a dessert wine if you wanted
 
a good option for back-sweetening country wine is to save enough must to bring it up to about 1010. It also gives it some fresh berry flavor

I haven't been particularly happy with any country wines when completely dry.
That a great idea. I getting ready to make strawberry. Will do that.
 
Backsweetening works provided you kill the yeast first. Maybe that's gimme but wanted to be sure you knew. If you just add must or sugar it will just ferment out and have a potential for bottle bombs. Potassium sorbate is popular but there are other ways to do it. You can simply warm the wine up... You coulda killed the yeast back when you liked it at 1.010 but most guys don't watch the ferment that often. FYI Frozen concentrate is a popular backsweetener for the cider guys and imagine it would well here but agree saved must is the better way.
 
Backsweetening works provided you kill the yeast first. Maybe that's gimme but wanted to be sure you knew. If you just add must or sugar it will just ferment out and have a potential for bottle bombs. Potassium sorbate is popular but there are other ways to do it. You can simply warm the wine up... You coulda killed the yeast back when you liked it at 1.010 but most guys don't watch the ferment that often. FYI Frozen concentrate is a popular backsweetener for the cider guys and imagine it would well here but agree saved must is the better way.
Yes, good point just in case. You must stabilize BEFORE backsweetening...or pasteurize immediately after.

Add potassium metabisulfite and sorbate, give it 24 hours, then add your sweetener.

Also For those unaware, stabilizers will not stop active fermentation.

Using must is the traditional method in traditional (read: grape) wines. Concentrate is fine, but pay attention to the quality of your source. Garbage in garbage out
 
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Yes, good point just in case. You must stabilize BEFORE backsweetening...or pasteurize immediately after.

Add potassium metabisulfite and sorbate, give it 24 hours, then add your sweetener.

Also For those unaware, stabilizers will not stop active fermentation.

Using must is the traditional method in traditional (read: grape) wines. Concentrate is fine, but pay attention to the quality of your source. Garbage in garbage out
I going to start a strawberry. I using recipe from youtube

How to Make Wine from Fruit The Only Wine Recipe You Will Ever Need

Any suggestions welcome. Is there a good way to stop fermentation at sweetness wanted or better to just let it go and back sweeten?

a good option for back-sweetening country wine is to save enough must to bring it up to about 1010. It helps bring back some bright fresh aroma and flavor that I find country wines to be lacking in. I haven't been particularly happy with any country wines when completely dry.
What do you need to do to preserve must until ready to use?
 
Took a quick look at the video and that looks pretty good to use. It might seem a little intimdating at first but gets real easy once it clicks for ya.

Hopefully he chimes in but I think most guys let it go and back sweeten using sugar. If saving must, it is usually frozen. Myself, I try and use a yeast (71B) that is known for leaving SOME sweetness so I can forgo back sweetening. The term is "off dry wine". That said, might not be sweet enough for you.

https://winemakermag.com/technique/backsweetening

https://winemakermag.com/article/857-country-wine-yeast-tips-from-the-pros
 
Took a quick look at the video and that looks pretty good to use. It might seem a little intimdating at first but gets real easy once it clicks for ya.

Hopefully he chimes in but I think most guys let it go and back sweeten using sugar. If saving must, it is usually frozen. Myself, I try and use a yeast (71B) that is known for leaving SOME sweetness so I can forgo back sweetening. The term is "off dry wine". That said, might not be sweet enough for you.

https://winemakermag.com/technique/backsweetening

https://winemakermag.com/article/857-country-wine-yeast-tips-from-the-pros

That last batch was reading just under .990 Man it went all the way. I put 1/8 tsp of pure stevia in bottle early and put into wine cooler.

The other bottle mixed 1Tbsp of water and sugar to make syrup and used 1 Tbps of that and was just right.
 
I going to start a strawberry. I using recipe from youtube

How to Make Wine from Fruit The Only Wine Recipe You Will Ever Need

Any suggestions welcome. Is there a good way to stop fermentation at sweetness wanted or better to just let it go and back sweeten?


What do you need to do to preserve must until ready to use?
To stabilize, you'll add potassium metabisulfite and potassium sorbate after confirming fermentation has stopped, then wait 24 hours for good measure.

Best/traditional practice would be to back sweeten with un fermented must. It gives back some fresh bright notes of the fruit used. Otherwise Any sugar will do. Unless you don't want to use preservatives,then you'll have to use un fermentable sugars to avoid spontaneous re fermentation.

If you wanted to stop a fermentation prematurely,you'd have to refrigerate it, but that requires monitoring gravity constantly, and being proactive because there will be some lag before the yeast goes dormant so it'll continue to eat sugars as it slows down in the fridge. However, unless you can filter out the yeast completely, you won't be able to remove it from the fridge without kicking up fermentation again
 
To stabilize, you'll add potassium metabisulfite and potassium sorbate after confirming fermentation has stopped, then wait 24 hours for good measure.

Best/traditional practice would be to back sweeten with un fermented must. It gives back some fresh bright notes of the fruit used. Otherwise Any sugar will do. Unless you don't want to use preservatives,then you'll have to use un fermentable sugars to avoid spontaneous re fermentation.

If you wanted to stop a fermentation prematurely,you'd have to refrigerate it, but that requires monitoring gravity constantly, and being proactive because there will be some lag before the yeast goes dormant so it'll continue to eat sugars as it slows down in the fridge. However, unless you can filter out the yeast completely, you won't be able to remove it from the fridge without kicking up fermentation again
Thanks for reply. I was thinking if could stop would retain more blueberry flavor but pretty hard to stop active fermentation. I like the idea of saving some must and will try that just was not sure how to store without it fermenting. Really need to let this blueberry go a year. I need to get stocked up so not a problem. Had same problem making whiskey. Hard to take the time to let it age.
 
IMO age is mostly a clarity and small bump in flavor development. Not a cure all. Most often you have to cheat a little to to make the finished product taste as expected. Especially the lighter flavored fruits like strawberry. Must, concentrate, extract, flavorings. Speeds things up ALOT too.

Best thing to do to "stay out of your product" is to keep making stuff. When I was 2x per month, aging was easy. Just run with your ideas. Do it. Best to do back to back and smaller batches that you can do side by side and say shoot out yeasts or other stuff.
 
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