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Where to buy Morton's Tender Quick and size

Bearcarver

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lol Okay... I stayed up way too late last night and haven't had enough coffee yet this morning....but..... I've read this over and over and see nothing wrong here.  Some people have access to Tenderquick and some do not.  This recipe looks like a good one to try for those who do not have tenderquick.

Another note... I've cured a heck of a lot of meat in my life (thanks to how I was raised) and when using a dry rub on bacon, I rub the required amount called for  according to the weight of the meat... THEN I shake off any excess, wrap and let it do it's thing while chilled. (usually 5 to 7 days)

When curing larger cuts of meat that require several treatments with the dry rub, I measure out the exact amount needed (according to the weight of the meat)...Then divide the cure into how ever many treatments I'm going to do.   Sometimes a large cut requires treating twice in the 30 day cure period, sometimes the meat requires three treatments. I rub the meat and DO NOT shake off the access.

We are talking about two different methods of curing... depending on what cut of meat you are treating.

Hope that makes sense... lol 

Now I really need another cup of coffee..


If this doesn't make sense... just ignore me while I wake up. lol
 
Hi Jeanie,

I have to disagree without being disagreeable on one point in your post. I really hate to do that, because I have more respect for you than you can imagine.

I know you and others have in your instructions to shake the cure off after rubbing. I am dead set against that. I figure if I'm gonna shake it off, why did I bother measuring it so accurately. I know how much falls off of my pieces, because I do them individually on a plate. There is sometimes quite a bit left on the plate, since I dry the pieces off real good before rubbing. I could be measuring & applying 1  3/8 ounce of TQ, and shaking off a half ounce. If my method seems too exacting to some, then I just like to err on the side of caution. I figure it's a better way to teach Newbies. If they want to change later, that's up to them.

Bear
Bear, Thanks..


I only do it this way because it is in the instructions from the Morton Tenderquick recipe that I use. I follow their instructions to a T.

jeanie
 
Yeah, Morton's recipes leave a lot to be desired.

Here's their's for CB.

No mention of shaking cure off.

No mention of flipping it.

No mention of the size of the Loin, yet they're saying cure it for 3 to 5 days.

Did you ever cure a loin for 3 to 5 days?

In my book that would be a pretty small loin to get it cured all the way through.

That's why I use my common sense & what I learned here, instead of their time & temp things.

Common sense says if you're going to measure the amount of cure with an accurate scale, it should all go in the bag with the meat it was measured for.

I follow their rule for how much cure to use, but not a lot of their other things.

Right from their site:

---------------------------------------
Canadian Bacon 

 View Printer-Friendly Version 
 Add to Recipe Box
 More recipes  with Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Tender Quick[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Product
 More recipes  with Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Sugar Cure[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Product (Plain and Smoke Flavored)

Prep Time:  20 minutes; refrigerate 3-5 days  
Servings:  1 pork loin, cut into 1/8 inch thick slices
 
[hr][/hr] 
Ingredients 
1 boneless pork loin
1 tablespoon Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Tender Quick[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  mix  or Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Sugar Cure[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup](Plain) mix  per pound of loin
1 teaspoon sugar per pound of loin
 
[hr][/hr] 

Directions

Trim fat from pork loin. Mix Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Tender Quick[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  mix or Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]Sugar Cure[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  
(Plain) mix and sugar. Rub mixture into the loin. Place loin in "food grade" plastic bag; 
tie open end. Refrigerate and allow to cure for 3-5 days. Remove from cure. 
Soak loin in cool water for 30 minutes; pat dry. Refrigerate uncovered to dry 
slightly before cooking.
Cut into 1/8 inch thick slices. Preheat skillet; brush with oil. Fry over low 
heat, turning to brown evenly, about 8 - 10 minutes.

Pea Meal Bacon: After loins are dry, rub liberally with a mixture of cornmeal 
and black and red pepper to taste. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. 
Before frying, sprinkle slices with additional cornmeal.
----------------------------------------

I'm not trying to tell you how to cure. I'm just explaining my reasoning for what I expressly tell people.

This is one of the very few things I disagree with you about.

Thanks,

Bear
 

cowgirl

Legendary Pitmaster
OTBS Member
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Joined Oct 2, 2007
lol Okay... I stayed up way too late last night and haven't had enough coffee yet this morning....but..... I've read this over and over and see nothing wrong here.  Some people have access to Tenderquick and some do not.  This recipe looks like a good one to try for those who do not have tenderquick.

Another note... I've cured a heck of a lot of meat in my life (thanks to how I was raised) and when using a dry rub on bacon, I rub the required amount called for  according to the weight of the meat... THEN I shake off any excess, wrap and let it do it's thing while chilled. (usually 5 to 7 days)

When curing larger cuts of meat that require several treatments with the dry rub, I measure out the exact amount needed (according to the weight of the meat)...Then divide the cure into how ever many treatments I'm going to do.   Sometimes a large cut requires treating twice in the 30 day cure period, sometimes the meat requires three treatments. I rub the meat and DO NOT shake off the access.

We are talking about two different methods of curing... depending on what cut of meat you are treating.

Hope that makes sense... lol 

Now I really need another cup of coffee..


If this doesn't make sense... just ignore me while I wake up. lol
 
Hi Jeanie,

I have to disagree without being disagreeable on one point in your post. I really hate to do that, because I have more respect for you than you can imagine.

I know you and others have in your instructions to shake the cure off after rubbing. I am dead set against that. I figure if I'm gonna shake it off, why did I bother measuring it so accurately. I know how much falls off of my pieces, because I do them individually on a plate. There is sometimes quite a bit left on the plate, since I dry the pieces off real good before rubbing. I could be measuring & applying 1  3/8 ounce of TQ, and shaking off a half ounce. If my method seems too exacting to some, then I just like to err on the side of caution. I figure it's a better way to teach Newbies. If they want to change later, that's up to them.

Bear
Bear, Thanks..


I only do it this way because it is in the instructions from the Morton Tenderquick recipe that I use. I follow their instructions to a T.

jeanie
 
Yeah, Morton's recipes leave a lot to be desired.

Here's their's for CB.

No mention of shaking cure off.

No mention of flipping it.

No mention of the size of the Loin, yet they're saying cure it for 3 to 5 days.

Did you ever cure a loin for 3 to 5 days?

In my book that would be a pretty small loin to get it cured all the way through.

That's why I use my common sense & what I learned here, instead of their time & temp things.

Common sense says if you're going to measure the amount of cure with an accurate scale, it should all go in the bag with the meat it was measured for.

I follow their rule for how much cure to use, but not a lot of their other things.

Right from their site:

---------------------------------------
Canadian Bacon 

 View Printer-Friendly Version 
 Add to Recipe Box
 More recipes  [color= rgb(0,0,0)]with Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Tender Quick[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Product[/color]
 More recipes  [color= rgb(0,0,0)]with Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Sugar Cure[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Product (Plain and Smoke Flavored)[/color]

Prep Time:  20 minutes; refrigerate 3-5 days  
Servings:  1 pork loin, cut into 1/8 inch thick slices
 
[hr][/hr] 
[color= rgb(0,0,0)]Ingredients 
1 boneless pork loin
1 tablespoon Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Tender Quick[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  mix  or Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Sugar Cure[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup](Plain) mix  per pound of loin
1 teaspoon sugar per pound of loin[/color]
 
[hr][/hr] 

Directions

Trim fat from pork loin. Mix Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  Tender Quick[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  mix or Morton[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]Sugar Cure[sup][emoji]174[/emoji][/sup]  
(Plain) mix and sugar. Rub mixture into the loin. Place loin in "food grade" plastic bag; 
tie open end. Refrigerate and allow to cure for 3-5 days. Remove from cure. 
Soak loin in cool water for 30 minutes; pat dry. Refrigerate uncovered to dry 
slightly before cooking.
Cut into 1/8 inch thick slices. Preheat skillet; brush with oil. Fry over low 
heat, turning to brown evenly, about 8 - 10 minutes.

Pea Meal Bacon: After loins are dry, rub liberally with a mixture of cornmeal 
and black and red pepper to taste. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. 
Before frying, sprinkle slices with additional cornmeal.
----------------------------------------

I'm not trying to tell you how to cure. I'm just explaining my reasoning for what I expressly tell people.

This is one of the very few things I disagree with you about.

Thanks,

Bear

 I should have specified.. I'm talking slab bacon.

Bear, I know you mean well but I'm going to follow the instructions I received from the company that made the product...not from a forum (not saying you...ANY one)...

I'm also not going to be convinced that the bacon I've made (a plethora of piggies worth) and my family made before me was not made correctly.

Thats a nice recipe you posted but it's not the one I use for Canadian Bacon either... I brine cure.
 

buffalosmoke

Meat Mopper
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Joined Apr 7, 2009
I've been using the above recipe from Charcuterie for some time now.....I've had really good results with it.

 Thanks for the info BuffaloSmoke!

I've got the Charcuterie book and have had it for some time now... I've never tried a recipe out of it yet. lol   need to do that one of these days.
CG....give the whiskey glazed smoked chicken a try.....really good stuff.
 

buffalosmoke

Meat Mopper
198
18
Joined Apr 7, 2009
I should also add that I like the cure recipe from Charcuterie because it's not as salty as TQ....don't have to soak it as long. I'm also not crazy about the PG in TQ. I'm sure it's a small amount, but I prefer the cure without it. I store my unused cure in a mason jar that has been vac-sealed to keep it dry and fresh. I also carefully weigh the meat and the cure as well.
 
Last edited:

cowgirl

Legendary Pitmaster
OTBS Member
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Joined Oct 2, 2007
I've been using the above recipe from Charcuterie for some time now.....I've had really good results with it.

 Thanks for the info BuffaloSmoke!

I've got the Charcuterie book and have had it for some time now... I've never tried a recipe out of it yet. lol   need to do that one of these days.
CG....give the whiskey glazed smoked chicken a try.....really good stuff.
Thanks BuffaloSmoke! I will check it out. :)
 
 

bbally

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
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Joined Aug 24, 2007
Thats a nice recipe you posted but it's not the one I use for Canadian Bacon either... I brine cure.
I am a peameal guy for doing the Canadian......... I like the original!
 

bilder

Fire Starter
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Joined Aug 29, 2010
My findings on jerky making actually go into a whole new realm, which not only includes the danger zone, as we all know it referred to as, but, the fact that you are drying out the meat brings a little known (to many folks)additional possibility for microbial issues. I have never made uncured jerky myself either, no will I ever, knowing what I know about dried meats. For starters, moisture has everything to do with the life cycles of microbial organisms, up to and including their death, if heat is expected to be an effective exterminator, if you will.
 
seems like that should be very easy to do since the cuts of meat are so thin....for non-cured meat what temp would you smoke at? 120? 150?
To go along with what I mentioned above, Doug, I must stress the following be completely understood before you consider making uncured jerky, as things can go very badly without you even knowing it until you're sick from it. Well, let me just say that if you want a really good tasting and good eating uncured jerky, you can't process it at low temperatures. The meat must be brought up to temperatures which will kill the pathogens (160*, if I recall) before it becomes dried. Basically, the meat has to cooked before it is dried...not conducive to a good jerky. If this is not followed, the live pathogens could become heat resistant due to the reduced moisture content in the meat, thereby not being killed even though the meat may be taken to a safe temp, but this being post-dried, resulting in colonizing to levels which may become unsafe for human consumption when the temperature of the meat does reach levels which the microbes can begin to thrive again, that being room temperature. Let me see if I can find the info again...it's been quite a while since I last read it.
 
I have made uncured jerky before and honestly, it is not worth the effort or worry.  I feel that you get a superior product by using a cure as well as a safer product.  Without a cure you really have to watch what you are doing and take care to hit the right temps for the right amount of time.  

Stick with a cure.  Both safer and easier. 
 

Bearcarver

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Morton's instructions for making Bacon---

The following is taken directly, and word for word from:

Morton Home Meat Curing Guide

Bacon

 It is recommended that bacon be given the dry cure treatment.  Cure with one application of 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) Morton Sugar Cure (Plain or Smoke Flavored) mix per pound of meat.  Rub cure on entire surface of the belly and apply excess mix on the meat side of the belly if hog was not skinned.  Place belly in clean food quality plastic bag and store skin-side-down.  Cure at 36˚ to 40˚ F for 7 days per inch of thickness.
   After curing is completed, scrub excess salt off the belly in lukewarm water and dry with paper towels or place skin-side down on an open shelf in refrigerator 1-2 days.  Cut  the finished cured bacon into 1-2 pound chunks, wrap and refrigerate until consumed.  Use the bacon within one week or freeze up to one month.

Then it also states---Morton's Sugar Cure (PLAIN) mix can be used interchangeably with Morton Tender Quick mix.

=============================================================================================================================

At no place does it tell you to shake off any of the cure that you applied to the meat.

This means that all of those digital scales that we bought to measure our cure to the nearest 1/16th ounce, or to the nearest gram, are not rendered totally useless.

And if anybody wants to follow Morton's directions to a "T", this is it.

Bear
 
Last edited:

cowgirl

Legendary Pitmaster
OTBS Member
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Joined Oct 2, 2007
Morton's instructions for making Bacon---

The following is taken directly, and word for word from:

Morton Home Meat Curing Guide

Bacon

 It is recommended that bacon be given the dry cure treatment.  Cure with one application of 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) Morton Sugar Cure (Plain or Smoke Flavored) mix per pound of meat.  Rub cure on entire surface of the belly and apply excess mix on the meat side of the belly if hog was not skinned.  Place belly in clean food quality plastic bag and store skin-side-down.  Cure at 36˚ to 40˚ F for 7 days per inch of thickness.
   After curing is completed, scrub excess salt off the belly in lukewarm water and dry with paper towels or place skin-side down on an open shelf in refrigerator 1-2 days.  Cut  the finished cured bacon into 1-2 pound chunks, wrap and refrigerate until consumed.  Use the bacon within one week or freeze up to one month.

Then it also states---Morton's Sugar Cure (PLAIN) mix can be used interchangeably with Morton Tender Quick mix.

=============================================================================================================================

At no place does it tell you to shake off any of the cure that you applied to the meat.

This means that all of those digital scales that we bought to measure our cure to the nearest 1/16th ounce, or to the nearest gram, are not rendered totally useless.

And if anybody wants to follow Morton's directions to a "T", this is it.

Bear
Bear, again.. I realize that you mean well. I also realize that you are new to making bacon.... I remember your first bacon making experience you posted here on the forum around a year ago.

I'm going to stick with the instructions I have (which have been around longer than you have been making bacon).

Some of us on the forum have been raising, slaughtering and curing our own meat for a lifetime.... and aren't going to change our ways.

Don't get me started on my old family recipe that uses enough salt to "float" an egg. lol  That recipe would probably curl your hair!

 
 

Bearcarver

SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Group Lead
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Joined Sep 12, 2009
Morton's instructions for making Bacon---

The following is taken directly, and word for word from:

Morton Home Meat Curing Guide

Bacon

 It is recommended that bacon be given the dry cure treatment.  Cure with one application of 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) Morton Sugar Cure (Plain or Smoke Flavored) mix per pound of meat.  Rub cure on entire surface of the belly and apply excess mix on the meat side of the belly if hog was not skinned.  Place belly in clean food quality plastic bag and store skin-side-down.  Cure at 36˚ to 40˚ F for 7 days per inch of thickness.
   After curing is completed, scrub excess salt off the belly in lukewarm water and dry with paper towels or place skin-side down on an open shelf in refrigerator 1-2 days.  Cut  the finished cured bacon into 1-2 pound chunks, wrap and refrigerate until consumed.  Use the bacon within one week or freeze up to one month.

Then it also states---Morton's Sugar Cure (PLAIN) mix can be used interchangeably with Morton Tender Quick mix.

=============================================================================================================================

At no place does it tell you to shake off any of the cure that you applied to the meat.

This means that all of those digital scales that we bought to measure our cure to the nearest 1/16th ounce, or to the nearest gram, are not rendered totally useless.

And if anybody wants to follow Morton's directions to a "T", this is it.

Bear
Bear, again.. I realize that you mean well. I also realize that you are new to making bacon.... I remember your first bacon making experience you posted here on the forum around a year ago.

I'm going to stick with the instructions I have (which have been around longer than you have been making bacon).

Some of us on the forum have been raising, slaughtering and curing our own meat for a lifetime.... and aren't going to change our ways.

Don't get me started on my old family recipe that uses enough salt to "float" an egg. lol  That recipe would probably curl your hair!

 
So you say you follow the Morton instructions to a "T", and I put their instructions word for word in the above post, and I don't know what I'm talking about, because you have been curing & smoking much longer than I have.

The fact remains that if you use a digital scale to measure exactly how much cure to use, and then you shake some of it off, you are NOT getting the proper amount of cure on your meat. And I have not found a Morton's recipe & instruction that says to shake the cure off after you rub it on, but before you put it in the bag. I have found one that doesn't say to shake it off, but that one is wrong because I don't know what I'm talking about. So the recipe I posted word for word from Morton's is wrong, and the one you didn't post, and I have not seen is right. I thought they only had one book.

I spend ALL of my forum time on this forum, and I just try to help people on this forum by giving any information I can find. I don't make things up. What I wrote was word for word from Morton's. If that is wrong---Then Morton's is wrong--They wrote it.

OK---I give up. 

Have a nice day,

Bear
 

cowgirl

Legendary Pitmaster
OTBS Member
7,642
46
Joined Oct 2, 2007
Morton's instructions for making Bacon---

The following is taken directly, and word for word from:

Morton Home Meat Curing Guide

Bacon

 It is recommended that bacon be given the dry cure treatment.  Cure with one application of 1/2 ounce (1 tablespoon) Morton Sugar Cure (Plain or Smoke Flavored) mix per pound of meat.  Rub cure on entire surface of the belly and apply excess mix on the meat side of the belly if hog was not skinned.  Place belly in clean food quality plastic bag and store skin-side-down.  Cure at 36˚ to 40˚ F for 7 days per inch of thickness.
   After curing is completed, scrub excess salt off the belly in lukewarm water and dry with paper towels or place skin-side down on an open shelf in refrigerator 1-2 days.  Cut  the finished cured bacon into 1-2 pound chunks, wrap and refrigerate until consumed.  Use the bacon within one week or freeze up to one month.

Then it also states---Morton's Sugar Cure (PLAIN) mix can be used interchangeably with Morton Tender Quick mix.

=============================================================================================================================

At no place does it tell you to shake off any of the cure that you applied to the meat.

This means that all of those digital scales that we bought to measure our cure to the nearest 1/16th ounce, or to the nearest gram, are not rendered totally useless.

And if anybody wants to follow Morton's directions to a "T", this is it.

Bear
Bear, again.. I realize that you mean well. I also realize that you are new to making bacon.... I remember your first bacon making experience you posted here on the forum around a year ago.

I'm going to stick with the instructions I have (which have been around longer than you have been making bacon).

Some of us on the forum have been raising, slaughtering and curing our own meat for a lifetime.... and aren't going to change our ways.

Don't get me started on my old family recipe that uses enough salt to "float" an egg. lol  That recipe would probably curl your hair!

 
So you say you follow the Morton instructions to a "T", and I put their instructions word for word in the above post, and I don't know what I'm talking about, because you have been curing & smoking much longer than I have.

The fact remains that if you use a digital scale to measure exactly how much cure to use, and then you shake some of it off, you are NOT getting the proper amount of cure on your meat. And I have not found a Morton's recipe & instruction that says to shake the cure off after you rub it on, but before you put it in the bag. I have found one that doesn't say to shake it off, but that one is wrong because I don't know what I'm talking about. So the recipe I posted word for word from Morton's is wrong, and the one you didn't post, and I have not seen is right. I thought they only had one book.

I spend ALL of my forum time on this forum, and I just try to help people on this forum by giving any information I can find. I don't make things up. What I wrote was word for word from Morton's. If that is wrong---Then Morton's is wrong--They wrote it.

OK---I give up. 

Have a nice day,

Bear
No... I follow the morton method that I have on hand to a T.

  I think that you are new to making bacon and didn't say you do not know what you are talking about. I am saying that you should probably stick with what you are comfortable with. Those of us that use different methods, be it shaking off certain cuts of meat or using an alternate cure recipe from the Charcuterie book (or any other book) should stick to what works for them.

One rule of thumb for everyone... don't combine recipes unless you know what you are doing.

I do believe that experience means a lot....no matter what field, be it processing your own meat or flying a plane. Years of tried and true methods are nothing to sneeze at.
 

Don't give up on your bacon making or your effort to help people do it your way.

I'm just one of those people who prefers to roll fatties on a diagonal, prefers to smoke briskets whole instead of dividing them, prefers to cold smoke bacon in a smokehouse... (not cook it)... and prefers to use bacon and ham methods that have worked for me for years.

 I'm a firm believer in the old saying.. "There's more than one way to skin a hog".... I believe a person should try them all and then choose what's best for them.
 

bilder

Fire Starter
69
17
Joined Aug 29, 2010
Been talking with a couple folks who got upset with me and think we have straightened out some stuff to avoid further misunderstandings.

I may put together a write up for those of you who cannot find TQ in your area.  Till then, no matter what method you use, follow the directions given for the cure you are using and you will make some fine jerky.  If a recipe calls for TQ, use TQ.  If it calls for cure #1, use cure #1.   Once you have gained some experience you can adjust a recipe to fit the cure you have and be safe, but for the person who is new to making jerky and curing meats it is best and safest to stick to what the recipe tells you to use.

Till then here is one of my standard recipes. Nothing too fancy, just a good basic jerky:

  • 1 lb lean meat, thinly sliced

  • 3/4 tsp. salt

  • 1/4 tsp. cracked pepper

  • 1 tbs. brown sugar

  • 2 tbs. soy sauce

  • 1 tbs. Worcestershire sauce

  • 1 clove crushed garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cure #1
  • If you want more heat add a half teaspoon of crushed red pepper
  • If using a dehydrator, you can add a quarter to half teaspoon of liquid smoke if you want to.
Add enough water to just cover the meat and let it sit covered in the fridge for 12-24 hours, giving it a good mix half way through.  One thing I do is to take a plate that will fit inside the bowl you are using and use that to weigh down the meat and keep it submerged.  Then smoke or dehydrate at 130 for 6-8 hours.
 
Last edited:

Bearcarver

SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Group Lead
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Joined Sep 12, 2009
Been talking with a couple folks who got upset with me and think we have straightened out some stuff to avoid further misunderstandings.

I may put together a write up for those of you who cannot find TQ in your area.  Till then, no matter what method you use, follow the directions given for the cure you are using and you will make some fine jerky.  If a recipe calls for TQ, use TQ.  If it calls for cure #1, use cure #1.   Once you have gained some experience you can adjust a recipe to fit the cure you have and be safe, but for the person who is new to making jerky and curing meats it is best and safest to stick to what the recipe tells you to use.

Till then here is one of my standard recipes. Nothing too fancy, just a good basic jerky:

  • 1 lb lean meat, thinly sliced

  • 3/4 tsp. salt

  • 1/4 tsp. cracked pepper

  • 1 tbs. brown sugar

  • 2 tbs. soy sauce

  • 1 tbs. Worcestershire sauce

  • 1 clove crushed garlic
  • 1/4 teaspoon Cure #1
  • If you want more heat add a half teaspoon of crushed red pepper
  • If using a dehydrator, you can add a quarter to half teaspoon of liquid smoke if you want to.
Add enough water to just cover the meat and let it sit covered in the fridge for 12-24 hours, giving it a good mix half way through.  One thing I do is to take a plate that will fit inside the bowl you are using and use that to weigh down the meat and keep it submerged.  Then smoke or dehydrate at 130 for 6-8 hours.

Bilder,

That looks like an outstanding recipe!

The next jerky I make will definitely be with that recipe.

Thank you very much!

Bear
 

chef willie

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OTBS Member
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Joined Dec 31, 2010
Ok, little off topic here on the make your own or not subject <grin>.....but on the cures. I'm having difficulty finding the TQ here but I did find the Morton Sugar Cure available. Checked the Morton website & they state it can be used interchangably with the TQ mix. Anybody try this instead of the TQ? any difference in flavor? I did read the bag in the store and it was all about curing hams but I'm just wanting it to do jerky. My second batch of jerky is in the near future and I rely heavily on the info off this forum. Thinking of trying chicken tender jerky also...any feedback on that? Thanks in advance guys....SMF rocks
 

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