Brisket to Ground Beef Processing

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Wow, so I just got through reading the Mariansky book and I discovered that generally, the hard fat is better than the soft fat!


So although this isn't the hard pork fat, it does seem like it's the better fat to have in sausages (for non-smearing sausages). If anything, I should be trimming the soft fat and not the hard!

I also did find an all-beef recipe that saves some of this hard fat and omits it from the grind. Then hand chops this fat (semi-frozen) and adds it without grind to the mixing step. This way, it's even more accentuated. Fascinating...

Just thought I'd share since I was originally inclined to trim the hard fat thinking it was less good.
Wow that's cool insight! Guess I'll save it for grinding and play with it. Could always render it down in a pot or something if need be :D
 
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Wow that's cool insight! Guess I'll save it for grinding and play with it. Could always render it down in a pot or something if need be :D

So I started worrying a bit, thinking that maybe Marianski was only talking about hard pork fat instead of hard fat in general. So I researched a bit more, and found this video of Aaron Franklin trimming a brisket. At around 2 mins in, he points to the soft top fat on the flat and says it's bad for sausage and then points to the deckle fat and says it's good for sausage. He then repeats that about 11 mins in, pointing to the hard fat on the top of the flat and the deckle fat.


So I think that because there's a lot of "bad fat" for sausages in the brisket, it gets a bad rap for use in sausage making. But the key is not to avoid brisket sausages, it is to rather trim the bad fat and use the good fat.

So I'll definitely be using the deckle fat from now on, and using that to replace the fat I'll now be trimming from my slices from the flat. Just posting here for posterity.
 
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So I started worrying a bit, thinking that maybe Marianski was only talking about hard pork fat instead of hard fat in general. So I researched a bit more, and found this video of Aaron Franklin trimming a brisket. At around 2 mins in, he points to the soft top fat on the flat and says it's bad for sausage and then points to the deckle fat and says it's good for sausage. He then repeats that about 11 mins in, pointing to the hard fat on the top of the flat and the deckle fat.


So I think that because there's a lot of "bad fat" for sausages in the brisket, it gets a bad rap for use in sausage making. But the key is not to avoid brisket sausages, it is to rather trim the bad fat and use the good fat.

So I'll definitely be using the deckle fat from now on, and using that to replace the fat I'll now be trimming from my slices from the flat. Just posting here for posterity.

Nice! I've had good results with the fat trip on top guess so can only go up from there lol. Good to know I can just slice and grind. I have like 15 pounds of beef fat already ground so will be a while before I need more :D
 
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