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Weber grill flare-ups

rybro

Newbie
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Joined Aug 1, 2016
I was trying to do some searching through the forums, but was only finding flare-up solutions to a smoker. Maybe the solution is the same, but I wanted to toss this out there.  

Last night, I was doing a couple ribeyes. I only used salt and pepper on them. I was doing the reverse sear method, letting them warmup on the indirect heat side. When I moved them over to the coals to sear, it was like an instant bon fire. I couldn't leave them on that side for more than 3 seconds without foot high flames started to rise up from the coals. It was frustrating and I couldn't figure out why. Never had it happen that bad before.

I'm using a Weber Kettle 22.5" grill and using Kingsford Professional Briquettes. I used a chimney and waited until they were ashed. I also have a slow-n-sear in the kettle that they were placed in. Any suggestions? Thanks.
 

schlotz

Master of the Pit
SMF Premier Member
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Joined Jan 13, 2015
High fat content e.g. rib-eyes will do this.  Best I can offer is to lower the heat a bit by not using so many briquettes but that also brings on other issues. Maybe placing a piece of foil in line with the meat directly on the coals (right before putting the meat on) to deflect the drippings but unsure how effective that would be. Never tried it myself.
 

bikerchef

Fire Starter
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Joined Feb 20, 2015
The problem is the reverse sear. I think you cooked the steaks

& you have all the fat & juices spilling into coals when you sear them.

I use a traditional sear.

A good hot flame. Should be so hot you

can't hold your hand over it for more than couple of seconds

Use the cover of your weber to quelch any flare up.
 
Last edited:

rybro

Newbie
25
18
Joined Aug 1, 2016
 
The problem is the reverse sear. I think you cooked the steaks

& you have all the fat & juices spilling into coals when you sear them.

I use a traditional sear.

A good hot flame. Should be so hot you

can't hold your hand over it for more than couple of seconds

Use the cover of your weber to quelch any flare up.
I usually with ribeyes use a traditional sear on high heat. But I LOVE the revearse sear, sounds like there may not be a solution for it on charcoal for a fatty steak. Only other thing to do is sear it on cast iron over coals, but then I don't achieve that charcoal wood flavor I wan't. But I think you hit the nail on the head.
 
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seenred

Legendary Pitmaster
OTBS Member
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Joined Feb 9, 2009
Hi Rybro,

There is another solution, but its a little spendy.  Take a look at Grill Grates.  They are anodized aluminum, interlocking grate panels.  The channel design really prevents flareups and allows drippings to sizzle directly below your meat, which IMO improves flavor.  I've been using them for quite a while on a pellet grill and really like how they sear a steak.  Since I got rid of the pellet grill, I'm asking for a set cut to fit my Weber 22" Kettle for Christmas.

Here is what they look like cut to fit a 22" kettle:


Like I said, they're a little pricey...a little over $100 plus shipping for 3 cut-to-fit, interlocking grate panels, plus their grate tool...you can order direct from Grill Grates' website or get them off Amazon.

Here is a link to an older thread where I used them on my pellet grill to sear a couple of steaks:

http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/183786/couple-of-quick-ribeyes-on-the-rec-tec-w-qview

Red
 
Last edited:

browneyesvictim

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Joined Aug 16, 2016
Don't fight it! Let the flare ups give the wonderful char and sear that you want! If flare ups are heavy like that, it just doesn't take as long. That is, if you have already cooked them to desired doneness when reverse searing. You do have some control with your lid and vents also.
 

rybro

Newbie
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Joined Aug 1, 2016
I am personally not a fan of that "burnt" flavor you speak of. I think it ruins a good cut of meat. I'd rather have that golden/brown crust that is packed full of flavor, not pure black. The meat would catch on fire after about 5 seconds....It was too much.
 

dirtsailor2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
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Joined Oct 4, 2012
You can get that golden crust you are looking for and the smokey wood flavor using a hot CI skillet. Do your indirect like you did above. Before that though place your CI directly over the coal and per-heat it. Make sure its damn hot prior to starting the steaks. Do your indirect then into the pan for the sear.You'll get the smokey flavor during the indirect then the sear to finish. We do this all the time an it's really the only way to prevent flare ups with fatty cuts like ribeye.
 

geezer

Smoking Fanatic
401
175
Joined Feb 24, 2017
 
The problem is the reverse sear. I think you cooked the steaks

& you have all the fat & juices spilling into coals when you sear them.

I use a traditional sear.

A good hot flame. Should be so hot you

can't hold your hand over it for more than couple of seconds

Use the cover of your weber to quelch any flare up.
This^^^^^^^^
 

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