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Looks like too many chunks

Discussion in 'Charcoal Smokers' started by GoldenAmbers BBQ, Jun 12, 2019.

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  1. GoldenAmbers BBQ

    GoldenAmbers BBQ Fire Starter

    For an 8 to 10 hour cook I tend to use an average of 1 chunk per hour on long cooks. Never have had anything get overly smoky. Some types of wood may be much stronger than apple or hickory and I might not get away with using so much.
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  2. SmokinVOLfan

    SmokinVOLfan Master of the Pit

    Mesquite would be one of those woods that you don't want to add a ton of because it is so strong. That might get the overly smoky flavor you are describing.
     
  3. Bearcarver

    Bearcarver SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster Group Lead OTBS Member

    I don't use chunks, but I would think if you burn 1 chunk per hour, it wouldn't get too smoky, but if you have 7 chunks in there & they all burn & smoke at one time, any species could get to taste too smoky.

    Bear
     
  4. GoldenAmbers BBQ

    GoldenAmbers BBQ Fire Starter

    True yes. Minion is safer to plop in a few chunks scattered around.

    I need to try mesquite soon. And olive I hear is good. I've only used mesquite chips before in an electric smoker.
     
  5. noboundaries

    noboundaries Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    With mesquite, use HALF what you normally use, and bury the chunks in the charcoal so they pre-heat prior to ignition. Doing so helps get rid of the turpentine-like taste of the initial smoke.

    I use mesquite all the time. I have a 22.24 lb turkey in the WSM as I type. I used one big hunk of mesquite, a 2"x8" log really, and buried it in the bottom of my charcoal.

    Never tried olive.
     
    tallbm and GoldenAmbers BBQ like this.
  6. gmc2003

    gmc2003 Legendary Pitmaster OTBS Member

    Your chunks are on the smaller side so you should be fine. I agree with Ray and bury them into the charcoal. For fish and poultry I like fruit woods and for beef and pork mostly hickory.

    Chris
     
  7. GoldenAmbers BBQ

    GoldenAmbers BBQ Fire Starter

    Burying the chunks would help keep down flare ups I bet. Temp spikes due to wind gusts. Cool
     
  8. I mostly only use charcoal to get my smoker going and then stick burn. My stuff isn't too smoky running 100% wood. A lot of it comes down to fire management (running a clean fire), moisture content of the wood (how seasoned it is) and wood type, I use mostly oak because it isn't super strong and still has a nice flavor.