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Cold smoke attachment and bacon

mdgirlinfl

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I unpacked and set up my Masterbuilt cold smoke attachment on my MES30
and I am ready to smoke some bacon (just as soon as the evening brings some cooler temps).
What is your method (time, temp, number of sessions) to cold smoke belly bacon?


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dirtsailor2003

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Dry brine cure. After cure rest bacon for 5 days in fridge. Then cold smoke for 6-8 hours. Rest in fridge overnight, repeat until I get the color I want. Then rest in fridge 5 days, cut into rashers vac pack and freeze. Current favorite smoke is cob. Have been adding dry rub of garlic powder and white pepper powder after curing.
 

mdgirlinfl

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Thanks dirtsailor2003. It has dried on a rack for 24 hours. It is dry to the touch but you go 5 days before smoking, uncovered?


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browneyesvictim

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Could you be a bit more specific about what you mean by "cold smoke"? Do you mean heating completely element OFF with your cooler evening temps? What are they? "Cold" could be a relative term when it comes to smoking bacon...

Something to consider is that the meat will take the smoke best in the 100'- to 140' and can shorten the smoking period. However some fat will start to render in those temperatures. Don't hold this as the final rule in the definition of "cold smoking" bacon, but this should give you an idea:

"Cold"
  • With no heat (<100') typically will go from 8 up to 36 hours of smoke the whole time. All a matter of personal preference and taste (and type of wood)
  • With 100' smoke you can do 2X- 12 hour smokes with a rest in the refrigerator in-between.  
  • With  the smoker at 125'-130 8-12 hours
  • Another method is to start "cold" and gradually increase the smoker temp until the desired color is obtained.
Me personally, I liked the 100' smoke for 2x 12 hour sessions (2 Amazens worth) with pecan out of all that I have done.  I haven't done Corn Cobb yet, but that's about to change this week for me!
 

crankybuzzard

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Follow what dirtsailor said.

The 5 days is to allow the cure and such to set on your belly, allows for some good firming, and also get a killer pellicle! The additional 5 days is a rest period AFTER smoke to let the smoke meld.
 

crankybuzzard

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Could you be a bit more specific about what you mean by "cold smoke"? Do you mean heating completely element OFF with your cooler evening temps? What are they? "Cold" could be a relative term when it comes to smoking bacon...

Something to consider is that the meat will take the smoke best in the 100'- to 140' and can shorten the smoking period. However some fat will start to render in those temperatures. Don't hold this as the final rule in the definition of "cold smoking" bacon, but this should give you an idea:

"Cold"
  • With no heat (
 

mdgirlinfl

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Follow what dirtsailor said.

The 5 days is to allow the cure and such to set on your belly, allows for some good firming, and also get a killer pellicle! The additional 5 days is a rest period AFTER smoke to let the smoke meld.
Thanks crankybuzzard. I'll follow (despite being anxious[emoji]128522[/emoji]). Currently the slabs are dry to the touch. I suspect they will get that tacky desired "pellicle" in the time suggested.



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mdgirlinfl

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Could you be a bit more specific about what you mean by "cold smoke"? Do you mean heating completely element OFF with your cooler evening temps? What are they? "Cold" could be a relative term when it comes to smoking bacon...



Something to consider is that the meat will take the smoke best in the 100'- to 140' and can shorten the smoking period. However some fat will start to render in those temperatures. Don't hold this as the final rule in the definition of "cold smoking" bacon, but this should give you an idea:



"Cold"

  • With no heat (<100') typically will go from 8 up to 36 hours of smoke the whole time. All a matter of personal preference and taste (and type of wood)
  • With 100' smoke you can do 2X- 12 hour smokes with a rest in the refrigerator in-between.  
  • With  the smoker at 125'-130 8-12 hours
  • Another method is to start "cold" and gradually increase the smoker temp until the desired color is obtained.

Me personally, I liked the 100' smoke for 2x 12 hour sessions (2 Amazens worth) with pecan out of all that I have done.  I haven't done Corn Cobb yet, but that's about to change this week for me!
I'll be smoking with no heat in outside temps in the 70s. No amazens but i have used my Masterbuilt cold smoke attachment for long smokes and it does nicely. I'll be sure to let them rest and absorb that smoke before I get all hungry and slice into them. This is all new to me. So I may let a couple bellies pieces go on the long and and a couple on the short end of smoking. I'll see how they look as I go
Thanks for the input. I value all of it!


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mdgirlinfl

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Thanks for the input all, I value all of it. Can't wait to get this first batch done and tweek it from there with the whole side of belly I have in the freezer :-)


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crankybuzzard

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I'll be smoking with no heat in outside temps in the 70s. No amazens but i have used my Masterbuilt cold smoke attachment for long smokes and it does nicely. I'll be sure to let them rest and absorb that smoke before I get all hungry and slice into them. This is all new to me. So I may let a couple bellies pieces go on the long and and a couple on the short end of smoking. I'll see how they look as I go
Thanks for the input. I value all of it!


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You've got it figured out!

There will always be up front sample, middle samples, and end results!

We all do that! :drool
 

pc farmer

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I follow DS also. The long rest after the smoke allows the moisture to gey out of the meat also. The meat gets stiffer.

Curing is a long process. The waiting game gets alot of people. If you can wait it will be better
 
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JckDanls 07

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I follow DS also. The long rest after the smoke allows the moisture to gey out of the meat also. The meat gets stiffer.

Curing is a long process. The waiting game gets alot of people. If you can wait it will be better
Plus it makes your fridge smell good for 5 days (after smoke)... but there are things that take on the smoke taste in the fridge that just doesn't taste right ...
 

mdgirlinfl

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Plus it makes your fridge smell good for 5 days (after smoke)... but there are things that take on the smoke taste in the fridge that just doesn't taste right ...[/quote]

Lol like donuts and milk


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pc farmer

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You don't like smoked milk?
 

akdutchguy

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Now you got me curious. I've smoked a lot of odd things but never a donut. I do my bacon similar to dirtsailor. Last batch smoked for 20 hours. Turned out good. You will never buy that store bought junk again. I did a belly piece in some Cobb. It has a great flavor. When I brought in my mailbox and smoker it made the Garage smell like I had an electrical fire. It was weird but the bacon was great.
Jason
 

SmokinAl

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I use the same MB cold smoker for bacon that you have.

However I found that if you use a longer piece of pipe it really cleans & cools the smoke.

Here's my setup.



Hope this helps!

Al
 

mdgirlinfl

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I use the same MB cold smoker for bacon that you have.


However I found that if you use a longer piece of pipe it really cleans & cools the smoke.


Here's my setup.









Hope this helps!



Al
THANKS Al! I consider your advice "expert". Thanks for sharing. I need to log on the web to do the points thing. But Points!


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daveomak

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MDGirl, morning...  You are on the right track cold smoking the belly...    Some great advice from our members...    

Cold smoking below 70 deg. F allows the smoke to penetrate the meat better than hot smoking...    From Marianski's forum...

..
The surface color won't be as pronounced but a "mature" depth of flavor will be there...  The rests in between processes, allows for the meat to "dry age" allowing for more depth of flavor like a dry aged steak....   also allows for the smoke, cure, salt and spices to get more evenly distributed throughout the meat...   Time is your friend when attempting to make a quality product...

This is from Marianski's forum also...
[h1]Cold Smoking[/h1]
Cold smoking at 52-71° F (12-22° C), from 1-14 days, applying thin smoke with occasional breaks in between, is one of the oldest preservation methods. We cannot produce cold smoke if the outside temperature is 90° F (32° C), unless we can cool it down, which is what some industrial smokers do. Cold smoking is a drying process whose purpose is to remove moisture thus preserving a product.

You will find that different sources provide different temperatures for cold smoking. In European countries where most of the cold smoking is done, the upper temperature is accepted as 86° F (30° C). The majority of Russian, Polish and German meat technology books call for 71° F (22° C), some books ask for 77° F (25° C). Fish starts to cook at 85° F (29.4° C) and if you want to make delicious cold smoked salmon that is smoked for a long time, obviously you can not exceed 86° F (30° C). Cold smoking assures us of total smoke penetration inside of the meat. The loss of moisture also is uniform in all areas and the total weight loss falls within 5-20% depending largely on the smoking time. Cold smoking is not a continuous process, it is stopped (no smoke) a few times to allow fresh air into the smoker.
 

Bearcarver

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Could you be a bit more specific about what you mean by "cold smoke"? Do you mean heating completely element OFF with your cooler evening temps? What are they? "Cold" could be a relative term when it comes to smoking bacon...

Something to consider is that the meat will take the smoke best in the 100'- to 140' and can shorten the smoking period. However some fat will start to render in those temperatures. Don't hold this as the final rule in the definition of "cold smoking" bacon, but this should give you an idea:

"Cold"
  • With no heat (<100') typically will go from 8 up to 36 hours of smoke the whole time. All a matter of personal preference and taste (and type of wood)
  • With 100' smoke you can do 2X- 12 hour smokes with a rest in the refrigerator in-between.  
  • With  the smoker at 125'-130 8-12 hours
  • Another method is to start "cold" and gradually increase the smoker temp until the desired color is obtained.
Me personally, I liked the 100' smoke for 2x 12 hour sessions (2 Amazens worth) with pecan out of all that I have done.  I haven't done Corn Cobb yet, but that's about to change this week for me!
All pretty accurate.

Stay below 140°---I use 100° to 130°, and never have any rendering. 

And it accepts Smoke better than either Cold or Hot smoking. 8 to 11 hours.

Link:

Bacon (Extra Smoky)

Bear
 
Last edited:

browneyesvictim

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You see!

DS says cold smoke

Cranky says  cold smoke is 40 F to 70f.

Dave says Cold smoking below 70 deg. F

Bear says 100-130’

It is interesting to note DaveOmak, Crankys (and others claim) “cold smoking allows smoke to penetrate the meat better than hot smoking” yet it takes longer to smoke! Bear says 100-130 accepts smoke better than either Cold or Hot smoking .  All of whom are veteran smokers and full of respectable wisdom (as well as the others in the above list and contributors to this post of course). Even Pops “hot” smokes and probably has smoked more bacon than all of us put together! But there are contradictions.... Which is it? Who/what is the final authority?

Now that fall has hit, it should be easier (for most) to stay below 70’. For you, it doesn’t sound like <70’ is achievable with what you’ve got for ambient temps. It is possible however, to lower your MES smoking chamber a few degrees with some ice in there, or some frozen water bottles.  For those that say they like to “cold” smoke <70’ is going to be a challenge in the summer months, or not smoke it at all then. So… what will it be? Accept a “warmer” smoke or NO BACON AT ALL? By whatever definition- hot, warm or cold… Find out what’s going to work best for YOU and your tastes! Obviously there’s more than one way to skin a cat!

…eww. No… we won’t be smoking that!
 

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