Best place to get replacement thermostat for a Smokin' Tex 1400 at a good price?

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Studly

Newbie
Original poster
Dec 26, 2023
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4
I have a Smokin Tex 1400 that is quite old, and the thermostat went out. The Smokin' Tex website sells them for $50 + shipping, but that seems high. Was thinking this same thermostat may be used in other brands of electric smokers, so maybe its widely sold and I can find the same thermostat at a parts website for much cheaper? Any suggestions on where to go to get a better price on one? Also, I know from this forum some people recommend upgrading to a PID for better temp control, but I'm not too worried about precise temp control unless it's not much more cost. Any recommendations or advice?
 
It is an expensive smoker and if it has served you well $50 to keep it running is not bad. Maybe someone can find something cheaper but I would want plug and play reliability. I will let others discuss PID costs.
 
It is an expensive smoker and if it has served you well $50 to keep it running is not bad. Maybe someone can find something cheaper but I would want plug and play reliability. I will let others discuss PID costs.
Thanks for the reply. Anyone know what the least expensive PID would cost that would work on the Smokin' Tex 1400, and would that be a big upgrade over replacing the standard thermostat?
 
JC in GB JC in GB tallbm tallbm are the the gurus who cane help you. Here is another thread that has some info and pricing.

 
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Thanks for the reply. Anyone know what the least expensive PID would cost that would work on the Smokin' Tex 1400, and would that be a big upgrade over replacing the standard thermostat?
Hi there and welcome!

I'm always in the "go with a PID controller" camp lol. Why?
Because your smoker will now be able to smoke ANYTHING because of the tight control and the accuracy you can achieve with your temps.
This means bacon, jerky, sausage, etc. no temp swings to ruin it.
If your insulation can handle smoker temps at 325F for 4 hours max or so, this means you can now do skin on chicken and turkeys where they will have easily edible skin and very likely even crispy skin!!!

So my suggestion is get a PID controller and do a simple where the existing cord hooks directly to the heating element or you take the existing wiring that goes to the existing controller and splice around the controller to where the wiring runs to the heating element.
This would make the cord and the smoker dumb where when it is fed electricity it will go directly to the heating element and heat up WITHOUT any control.

A PID controller will run you $150 but really what you are buying is a whole new smoker for $150, not a part for a smoker.
With a replacement thermostat costing $50, you will really only bet getting a "new" improved smoker for $100 difference!

Just for clarity this would work in the following way:

  • Rewired smoker cord plugs into the PID controller
  • PID controller temp probe drops down the smoker vent and you clip it to the bottom of the lowest rack, on the underside of the rack, in the center of the rack to read the smoker temps
  • Plug the PID into the wall outlet and punch in the smoker temp you want
  • The PID will take power from the wall outlet and feed it to the smoker to hit and hold at the set temp you entered into the PID
  • It will hold dead on or within 1-3 degrees of your set temp
  • Done!

That is too good of a smoker to throw out and I believe you would be drastically improving upon an already good thing if you went the PID controller route.

Just my 2 cents. I hope this info helps :D
 
Hi there and welcome!

I'm always in the "go with a PID controller" camp lol. Why?
Because your smoker will now be able to smoke ANYTHING because of the tight control and the accuracy you can achieve with your temps.
This means bacon, jerky, sausage, etc. no temp swings to ruin it.
If your insulation can handle smoker temps at 325F for 4 hours max or so, this means you can now do skin on chicken and turkeys where they will have easily edible skin and very likely even crispy skin!!!

So my suggestion is get a PID controller and do a simple where the existing cord hooks directly to the heating element or you take the existing wiring that goes to the existing controller and splice around the controller to where the wiring runs to the heating element.
This would make the cord and the smoker dumb where when it is fed electricity it will go directly to the heating element and heat up WITHOUT any control.

A PID controller will run you $150 but really what you are buying is a whole new smoker for $150, not a part for a smoker.
With a replacement thermostat costing $50, you will really only bet getting a "new" improved smoker for $100 difference!

Just for clarity this would work in the following way:

  • Rewired smoker cord plugs into the PID controller
  • PID controller temp probe drops down the smoker vent and you clip it to the bottom of the lowest rack, on the underside of the rack, in the center of the rack to read the smoker temps
  • Plug the PID into the wall outlet and punch in the smoker temp you want
  • The PID will take power from the wall outlet and feed it to the smoker to hit and hold at the set temp you entered into the PID
  • It will hold dead on or within 1-3 degrees of your set temp
  • Done!

That is too good of a smoker to throw out and I believe you would be drastically improving upon an already good thing if you went the PID controller route.

Just my 2 cents. I hope this info helps :D
Thanks very much for the suggestion to upgrade to a PID, and explaining it so well! You are very convincing and have some good points. I'll check the other threads here on modding the smoker with a PID, and give it some serious thought. I assume they would also list the best place online to buy a PID?
 
Thanks for the reply. Anyone know what the least expensive PID would cost that would work on the Smokin' Tex 1400, and would that be a big upgrade over replacing the standard thermostat?

If you can do your own wiring, get yourself a REX C-100 PID with a k-type thermocouple and a 40 amp SSR module and you are back in business for under $20.


JC :emoji_cat:
 
Excellent, will check into it! Haven't done my own wiring in electronics before, but have done home wiring and things. So should be able to figure it out. Didn't realize you could get a PID so inexpensively! Thanks for the suggestion.
 
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Excellent, will check into it! Haven't done my own wiring in electronics before, but have done home wiring and things. So should be able to figure it out. Didn't realize you could get a PID so inexpensively! Thanks for the suggestion.

No problem. When you order, make sure you are getting the SSR output not the relay out. The link I sent you looks like it has the relay output. Both will work but SSR out is an easier wiring job.

JC :emoji_cat:
 
Thanks for the clarification. So is this the setup I want to find, as seen in this video? Is that an SSR output?

I just wired up a controller this morning. The wiring wasn't bad at all. :emoji_sunglasses:

rex c 100 controller 1-1-24 02.jpg


JC :emoji_cat:
 
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Thanks very much for the suggestion to upgrade to a PID, and explaining it so well! You are very convincing and have some good points. I'll check the other threads here on modding the smoker with a PID, and give it some serious thought. I assume they would also list the best place online to buy a PID?
No problem. Sorry for the delay in replying, holiday stuff and then work.

I'm always down to promote the benefits of a PID controller. If you build or buy be sure to ask all the questions you have :D
 
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I just wired up a controller this morning. The wiring wasn't bad at all. :emoji_sunglasses:

View attachment 684772

JC :emoji_cat:
Been watching more videos on this PID, and reading more forum threads on it and how people set it up. One question: What kind of case do you put these PID components into to keep them somewhat protected from the weather when you use them on your smoker? Some use a case that comes with an overall kit along with this type of PID ... looks like of like an oversized electrical box made of plastic. I've even seen one person who uses a metal ammo box as his case, which should be good and fireproof, but probably tough to cut into. Also, I've read about some of these PIDs from China melting down and I see some people order and use a heatsink with them, which I assume would prevent any overheating issues. Do you use a heatsink on your PID builds for smokers?
 
Been watching more videos on this PID, and reading more forum threads on it and how people set it up. One question: What kind of case do you put these PID components into to keep them somewhat protected from the weather when you use them on your smoker? Some use a case that comes with an overall kit along with this type of PID ... looks like of like an oversized electrical box made of plastic. I've even seen one person who uses a metal ammo box as his case, which should be good and fireproof, but probably tough to cut into. Also, I've read about some of these PIDs from China melting down and I see some people order and use a heatsink with them, which I assume would prevent any overheating issues. Do you use a heatsink on your PID builds for smokers?

I don't use a heatsink on my electrical controllers. I mount the SSR right to the controller case. I never have had any issues doing this other than the controller being too cold in the winter to run. I added a resistive heater to the box to combat this. I have been running this type of controller for a few years and never had any major failure.

The enclosures I use are extruded aluminum cases that I spec'd and purchased from a vendor. They aren't perfect but they work quite well for my controller projects. I have a limited quantity of cases and controllers available if you are interested in purchasing one. Also, if you don't want to fool with the build, I can build you one.

If you want to DIY, you can stack conduit boxes to get a crude but effective enclosure that you can cut and drill as needed.

JC :emoji_cat:
 
Holy crap! Lol I skimmed that video and immediately know that even if I could figure out the wiring I'd be too dumb to operate it. I plan on getting a plug and play Auber due to my lack of technical ability or understanding.
That's the reason I stick with charcoal. I'm totally illiterate when it comes to electronics.

Chris
 
I don't use a heatsink on my electrical controllers. I mount the SSR right to the controller case. I never have had any issues doing this other than the controller being too cold in the winter to run. I added a resistive heater to the box to combat this. I have been running this type of controller for a few years and never had any major failure.

The enclosures I use are extruded aluminum cases that I spec'd and purchased from a vendor. They aren't perfect but they work quite well for my controller projects. I have a limited quantity of cases and controllers available if you are interested in purchasing one. Also, if you don't want to fool with the build, I can build you one.

If you want to DIY, you can stack conduit boxes to get a crude but effective enclosure that you can cut and drill as needed.

JC :emoji_cat:
Thanks for the offers to sell a case or a build, JC. For now, I think I'll skip that since I want to learn to build them myself. But like you, I'm in the north country (Minnesota), so the very cold temps could be a problem in the winter. If you have time and wouldn't mind sharing more info on the resistive heater you use, and how to hook it up, that would be appreciated!
 
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Thanks for the offers to sell a case or a build, JC. For now, I think I'll skip that since I want to learn to build them myself. But like you, I'm in the north country (Minnesota), so the very cold temps could be a problem in the winter. If you have time and wouldn't mind sharing more info on the resistive heater you use, and how to hook it up, that would be appreciated!
Nice diving into building a PID controller!

A few (unrequested) tips that will help you have good success from the start:

  1. Get a bigger box/enclosure vs smaller. Having extra room for your hands, wiring, components, etc. makes life soooooo much easier.
  2. Drilled holes (round) are your friend. The only thing that needs a square/rectangular hole is the PID controller itself. What about outlets/plugs you say.... see #3
  3. Cannibalize an outdoor rated extension cord for your male and female "outlet" plugs instead of trying to use those crappy plastic square outlet components that just melt down. Use relief glands to fasten them to your project box/enclosure and finally.... this means you drill holes instead of cutting squares/rectangles AND you eliminate cheap plastic outlets that will likely meltdown on you. I went through 4 outlets before switching to this route
    71QU3dqw6mL.jpg


    $7 on amazon for this cord:
    71EyIIpEDML._AC_SX679_.jpg


    Here's the last one I built and to do it all over again I would get a bigger box AND I would go a different route for the yellow rectangle thermocouple connector. I would use a very small M8 sized relief gland and do the same as the power cord or use a round connector (though they cost a bit).
    fNKSySr.jpg


  4. Get a good switch that wont melt down on you!!! I went through at least 5 rocker switches claiming 20amp rating... cheap plastic trash. On this build I used a 40amp single pole marine breaker switch. It's rock solid, great price AND yep, round hole drilling for installation. You just have to buy some M3 screws separately to mount to the box:
    $14 and less with the 8% coupon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07H947FZC/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1
    61GSaQdElYL._SX522_.jpg


  5. If using a fuse and fuse holder than I found the Bussmann fuse holders were the only ones that didn't melt down on me. Again, round drilling of holes too :D
I hope this info helps you to avoid all the meltdown and lessons learned I've gone through in my few builds :D
 
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