Another DRY brisket

Discussion in 'Grilling Beef' started by danbono, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Hi All Once again I tried smoking a packer/brisket..This one was 8 .86 pounds before removing the deckle fat.Started in my Brinkmanns Smoke N Pit at 7 am. using Kingsford Blue mixed with Royal Oak Lump. Wood was 1 each mini split of Pecan and Apple. Smoked for 5 hrs with temps at 200-250, at noon, the brisket was wrapped,beef broth was added to the foiled brisket, then placed in the the oven at 250*. At 5 pm. the point was done the probe went in n out easily, the flat needed more time another 1 hr. Here are the results the point was tender, tasty and juicy. The flat was tender and tasty but DRY, no moisture.The point was very red hope you can it in the pic, the flat had a nice smoke ring.
    Question why was the point soo red?

    Thanks Dan
    PS So far all my 10-12 tries with brisket have come out dry.

     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  2. so ms smoker

    so ms smoker Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

      Not sure what you mean by the 'deckle fat' . I remove the fat from the meat side of the brisket but leave the main fat cap and smoke with that side down to help protect the meat from the heat.

       Mike
     
  3. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Hi
    Deckle fat=fat between the point n flat.I think that what it is called?
    The brisket had very little fat on it,not like most.
    Thanks Dan
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  4. so ms smoker

    so ms smoker Master of the Pit Group Lead OTBS Member

      Most brisket, especially a packer, should have a heavy fat cap on one side. Not always on a flat, but usually. I would not remove that for smoking weather you smoke fat cup up or done. I remove on the other side to allow more rub to meat area.

       Do you have any pics of your brisket before and after trimming? This could help.

      Mike
     
  5. bearcarver

    bearcarver Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Looks Great!!!

    Were you watching internal temps? It normally takes less time to do a flat than a point.

    Bear
     
  6. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Hi I wasn't watching internal temps till 9 hr mark. At that time point was around 200* the flat 187*.
    Point probe went in n out like butter, not so for the flat.I remove the point and placed the foiled flat back in the in oven at 250*.Flat was in the in oven another 1 hour,temp was 200 when the probe went in like butter.
    I've never seen so much red in a point? Almost looked like it was cooked rare. Also the point when in the smoker was closest to the heat source.
    Thanks Dan
    PS Temps were taken with a Maverick 732, which tested right on.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  7. bruno994

    bruno994 Master of the Pit

    You are correct, at least that's what I call it, I have read it referred to as several different terms.  I have also read articles referring to the point as being the deckle.  Others state the deckle is the fat and muscle that connect the brisket to the cows rib cage.  Maybe one of our resident butchers here can answer the question...

    Now back to the dry brisket..I agree with Bearcarver, 99% of the time the flat will be done before the point due to the higher content of internal fat in the point compared to the flat section.  Point may have been situated where it was exposed to more smoke hence the deep smoke ring...maybe?  What IT was the flat at when you pulled it or did you just go by feel?  How long did you let the brisket rest before slicing?  Do you know what IT it was at when you sliced?  If you were looking for a lot of moisture in the flat, you might be expecting way too much out of your briskets also.  The au jus from the pan does wonders for moisture, especially when we are talking about the flat.  A little trick that those of us use in comp cooking, is to soak the slices in au jus before turn ins because of the tendency the flat slices have to dry out quickly. 
     
  8. bearcarver

    bearcarver Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    I like to pull meats that I'm going to "pull" at 200* to 205*.

    Low & long & slow Meats like Brisket & Chuckies, I like to pull about 190* if I plan to slice it.

    Next Chucky flat, try pulling it at about 190*. See if that is less dry.

    Bear
     
  9. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member


    You are correct, at least that's what I call it, I have read it referred to as several different terms. I have also read articles referring to the point as being the deckle. Others state the deckle is the fat and muscle that connect the brisket to the cows rib cage. Maybe one of our resident butchers here can answer the question...

    Now back to the dry brisket..I agree with Bearcarver, 99% of the time the flat will be done before the point due to the higher content of internal fat in the point compared to the flat section. Point may have been situated where it was exposed to more smoke hence the deep smoke ring...maybe? What IT was the flat at when you pulled it or did you just go by feel?
    How long did you let the brisket rest before slicing?
    Rest time was about 15/20 minutes tented on the cutting board. I've tried wrapping in foil and placed in a cooler with towels, with pretty much the same results.

    Do you know what IT it was at when you sliced?
    Temps at 200 when sliced.
    If you were looking for a lot of moisture in the flat, you might be expecting way too much out of your briskets also. The au jus from the pan does wonders for moisture, especially when we are talking about the flat. A little trick that those of us use in comp cooking, is to soak the slices in au jus before turn ins because of the tendency the flat slices have to dry out quickly

    Will reheat with beef broth.Most of my brisket points were used for brunt ends.
    Thanks Dan
    PS Sorry about the text colors, No matter what I They didn't change color..
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  10. kathrynn

    kathrynn Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    Dan....I have had that same problem...and trying to get mine to where Lynn (Hubby) likes them.

    I went to some comps and helped a few pro teams.  Learned a few tricks.  The guys trimmed the "hard fat" from the meat.....and injected them.  Then rubbed and placed in the smoker to about a temp of 160-165*.  THEN....they put the meat in a foil pan....added their "broth" and a bottle of Dr. Pepper (not diet) and a little gel pack from Knorr of Beef broth.  Foiled and put back in until the meat got to the temp they wanted.  When slicing....they cut the fat cap off and kept it intact.  After slicing ....placed the fat cap back on and back into the juices in the pan....and did their comp boxes.  Was the moistest I have tasted.  I tried that method and the last 2 that I have done were my best to date.

    Just my Humble tricks and 2 cents.

    Kat
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  11. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Hi Kat Thanks for the information..By the way cold brisket isn't soo bad, as long as the taste n tenderness is there.I will keep trying briskets till I get it right!!!

    I have one of those Super-Fast Thermapen on the way, should reduce all the probing I do.Just might be letting the juices out??
    Thanks Dan
    PS I think I'm getting close.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2013
  12. lol. well why all the probing?
     
  13. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Hi I was probing different parts of the flat. I think that is one of problems..Too much probing.
    I have a Super-Fast Thermapen on the way, should reduce the probing..
    Thanks Dan
     
  14. bearcarver

    bearcarver Smoking Guru OTBS Member

    I would recommend a digital wireless, like an ET-732.

    Then sterilize it with an alcohol wipe, and after 2 or 3 hours insert it into the "thickest" part. No more probing needed.

    Bear
     
  15. bruno994

    bruno994 Master of the Pit

    Biggest problem I see was if you sliced it at 200 degrees IT.  Optimal slicing temp is once the brisket has cooled down to around 160 or so.  This is the point at which the muscle fibers have relaxed from all the stress of cooking and the juices have redistributed properly. 

    Another factor is the actual meat.  I have cooked hundreds of briskets and some are just destined to be a bit on the dry side, it's the nature of a lean cut.  Obviously the higher the fat content internally, the better chance you have of the meat staying moist after cooking. 

    As far as probing, I use a tothpick and not a therm probe due to the size, the thermapen should help out with the size issue though. 

    As far as finishing IT, I really think that it all comes down to elevation.  I live probably 500 feet above sea level and have only had a few briskets reach toothpick tender at anything less than 210 degrees.  It also comes down to persoanl preference once again, some like a brisket slice to have some tug, I don't I want to be able to pick the slice up by one end, still hold together, give it a slight pull and the slice should break.  This is a pic of my last comp brisket (3rd place), cooked to 211 degrees IT before I pulled it off and placed into the cooler for a 3 hour rest.  Slices held together well after a 10 minute dunk into the au jus for added moisture.


    Keep on plugging away Dan, you'll find the right method for you and your smoker. 
     
  16. danbono

    danbono Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Hi All I will keep plugging away till I get it right..At 200* the probe went in n out like butter,don't see the need to cook it up to 210? Won't it be overcooked at 210?
    I let it rest for 20 minutes before carving.
    Has some brisket heated up with beef broth, still on the dry side..The best way to eat it is cold right from the fridge.It became my nightly snack. The point was OK but the flat was another story. I really don't want to start injecting.

    Thanks Dan
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  17. This may be a silly question....but are you buying choice brisket or select?
     
  18. Overcooked at 210? Hardly.I've taken a few briskets up to 215..not all briskets are the same. the internals break down when they want..might be 200 might be 205, hell it might be 215. That's the wonderful world of brisket.
     
  19. backwoods bbq

    backwoods bbq Meat Mopper

    yea...jbomx has a valid point. I don't buy select briskets anymore unless I can get a good deal on them for scrapping (hamburher meat, stew meat, beef fat, etc. I actually passed on a select brisket at the grocery today at 1.49lb select. If you don't have enough fat marbled inside your brisket it will become dry and can be very unpredictable on IT times. I like to buy choice cuts. I can get them for like 2.39 or 2.29lb and is well worth the exta money IMEO. If I didn't have a freezer full of beef and hamburger meat I woulda bought that lean brisket as im sure it was an incorrect price label! Oh yeah Turn and burn is also correct sometimes 195 sometimes 215 and it will slice all the same...years of practice will gove you the 'Texas Feel' where you can just pick it up and tell otherwise in the mean time use the tooth pick method.
     
  20. All choice for me. If I have a couple extra bucks I'll splurge on a prime, but choice works great for me and my family and friends all the time :biggrin:
     

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