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Wild Boar Italian Sausage

gary s

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That sure looked good, I'm all fired up about getting into that

Gary
 

sawhorseray

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Thank you for the like Richie! It was kind of fun for me to go back and re-visit this thread, then I realized how many responders hadn't been heard from in quite some time. Life goes on. RAY
 

grabber

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Up here in WNY, we don't have them and from what I'm reading, don't want them, due to all the damage they do to agriculture, wildlife, etc.
My concern with killing the parasites they carry in the meat. Can someone with experience address this. Thanks in advance.
 

sawhorseray

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If you gut, skin, and process a wild hog properly there shouldn't be any problem, they are excellent tableware. Wild hogs are on the move and it's predicted they'll move into every state in the USA in the next 30 to 50 years, they do a LOT of damage. Here's a read. RAY

 

grabber

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I'm sure, you can answer this question that once you have feral hog meat, you won't enjoy domestic pork again. Much tastier. Thanks for help.
 

indaswamp

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daveomak

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Trichinosis
Food preparation
Larvae may be killed by the heating or irradiation of raw meat. Freezing is normally only effective for T. spiralis, since other species, such as T. nativa, are freeze resistant and can survive long-term freezing.[14]
All meat (including pork) can be safely prepared by cooking to an internal temperature of 165 °F (74 °C) or higher for 15 seconds or more.
Wild game: Wild game meat must be cooked thoroughly (see meat preparation above) Freezing wild game does not kill all trichinosis larval worms. This is because the worm species that typically infests wild game can resist freezing.
Pork: Freezing cuts of pork less than 6 inches thick for 20 days at 5 °F (−15 °C) or three days at −4 °F (−20 °C) kills T. spiralis larval worms; but this will not kill other trichinosis larval worm species, such as T. nativa, if they have infested the pork food supply (which is unlikely, due to geography).
Pork can be safely cooked to a slightly lower temperature, provided that the internal meat temperature is at least as hot for at least as long as listed in the USDA table below.[22] Nonetheless, it is prudent to allow a margin of error for variation in internal temperature within a particular cut of pork, which may have bones that affect temperature uniformity. In addition, kitchen thermometers have measurement error that must be considered. Pork may be cooked for significantly longer and at a higher uniform internal temperature than listed below to be safe.
Internal Temperature Internal Temperature Minimum Time
(°F).... (minutes)
120..... ....1260
122 .......... 570
124........... 270
126...........120
128 .......... 60
130........... 30
132........... 15
134........... 6
136........... 3
138 .......... 2
140 ...........1
142 ...........1
144 ........... Instant
[22]

Unsafe and unreliable methods of cooking meat include the use of microwave ovens, curing, drying, and smoking, as these methods are difficult to standardize and control.[14]

To kill trich, I would cook the meat at 138-140F and hold the meat at that temp for at least an hour to compensate for varying temps in the smoker and possibly a thermometer that was incorrect...
Calibrate you smoker temp and thermometers BEFORE you attempt any serious food safety steps like this.....

..
 

sawhorseray

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Thanks Dave! I've whacked right about 70 wild hogs in my hunting career, that's what got me into making my own sausage and smoking my own hams. As you can see from the date of this post I've been doing this for quite some time, stopped bringing the dead hogs to the butcher shop right around 20 years ago or more. For at least the last five years I've stopped using my own seasoning mix on the sausage I make, I use a pre-mixed 260-B package from PS Seasonings, get the same great flavor in my sausage each and every time. No one, including myself, has ever gotten sick from eating the hams or sausage I process. If you know what you are doing after the trigger get pulled you get the animal gutted, skinned, and into a cooler ASAP, without getting a bunch of piss and poop running all over the meat. Myself, I don't accept or eat wild game meat killed by others, maybe another great reason why I've never gotten sick, I'm just not all that trusting in the capabilities of others. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand that all meat, not just wild game, must be cooked to safe standards to avoid health issues.

PS. Just a little side note here, presentation counts. When or if you are ever offered homemade sausage by a friend take a close look before accepting. If the sausages are different lengths and thicknesses that's a sign the maker didn't take pride in what he was producing, and could be a good indicator as to the safety practices he followed, or didn't follow, when making the links. Who's kidding who, when you get food sick there's no one to blame but yourself. RAY
 

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