What are your tips and tricks for making bread???

  • Some of the links on this forum allow SMF, at no cost to you, to earn a small commission when you click through and make a purchase. Let me know if you have any questions about this.
SMF is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission.

HowlingDog

Smoking Fanatic
Original poster
★ Lifetime Premier ★
Jan 16, 2019
369
429
Good Morning from So Calif...
I am getting the itch to make bread/english muffins/pizza dough again but every time I have tried in the past, they look fine, but the taste like flour mixed with water and heated up. Just plain bland. You would think these would be tasty... but Nope.....
IMG_2957.JPG

They tasted like flour.

I know I am missing something and I am kneeling before the All Knowing Wisdom of the Forum Experts: What the heck do you do??

I use basic Gold Medal AP flour, tap water from Southern Calif, and the little packets of yeast. Sometimes I will hand knead, sometimes I will use the KitchenAid with dough hook. Our house is generally cold and tends to lower humidity. The end result is just little or no bread flavor. Just baked flour.

Thanks for any advice. As I was looking at other comments about breadmaking, others have said the internet is full of conflicting information and you folks have never let me down.....

Mark
 
Generally, in the oven. It is a gas oven but it has a warm setting that is about 100 degrees. It will go in there for the time called for by the recipe.
 
I'm in for this one! Not an expert so can't help you.

Ryan
 

Dry malt (diastatic) baking powder is like magic for making bread. Adds flavor, texture and feeds the yeast. Huge difference. The pros use this stuff and you will see it listed on the ingredients of many high end breads. It won't taste like flour anymore. Think malted milkshakes.​

And you can always use it to make beer or whiskey in a pinch..
 
  • Like
Reactions: BrianGSDTexoma
What ratio of salt are you using?
I have the same thought with the comment about taste . I use straight tap water , but like said above different part of the country .
I'll just say 100 degrees is to high for proofing . I use about 70 degrees .
Here's a thread that might have something you can use .

 
I try to keep a couple gallons of distilled water around for such things. I know at times I can smell the chlorine in our water. Maybe it doesn't matter. Things usually are spur of the moment around here.

Ryan
 
  • Like
Reactions: SecondHandSmoker
Ideal proofing temps are all over the place. Depending on what you are making. I've seen 80 degrees. To 95 degrees. And 97 degrees for pizza dough. And 78 degrees for long proofs. Not sure if there is a true right. Or wrong.
 
What ratio of salt are you using?
I have the same thought with the comment about taste .

Thanks Everyone!! I use basic Mortons salt, iodine, and whatever the recipe calls for. What should I do different with salt? More? Less? Pink? Cure #1? :emoji_thinking:

Old Pirate said:

Dry malt (diastatic) baking powder is like magic for making bread.​

Thanks Old Pirate. I have not seen it listed as an ingredient so I have never used it (or heard of it). I will see what I can find locally and give it a try.

Thanks for the comments about water and temp too. We use some bottled water so we have that

How important is humidity during proofing? I can open the oven door slightly to control the temp, but would a pan of hot water help by adding humidity?

Appreciate all the helpful comments.


Mark
 
When I proof in the oven. I put a small pan of warm water in with it. My new proofer has a tray to add moisture.
 
I'm all-in with no-knead bread.

463 grams bread flour
1-1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp instant dry yeast
12 oz. room temp water (I use reverse osmosis water)

Mix ingredients in a bowl until all the flour has been moistened
cover bowl with cling wrap and towel

leave overnight

Next day, pre-heat oven with Dutch Oven with lid, inside, at 450 degrees for an hour (from when I turn the oven on)

Turn dough out on a flowered surface and use a dough scraper to shape it into a round shape. Use flour if dough seems too sticky. Cover dough with a towel while oven heats.

Once oven is heated give the dough a final shaping. Using a sharp knife, score the dough.

Transfer dough, using dough scraper, to a sheet of parchment paper. Take Dutch oven out of oven, uncover, and drop parchment paper with dough in.

Return, covered, to oven for 35 min. After 35 minutes are up, remove cover from Dutch oven. Set timer for 7 min (or longer or shorter depending on how much browning you want). When done, take out of oven and lift out bread using the parchment paper. Slide onto a cooling rack and let cool.

Slice and eat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JLeonard
Good Morning from So Calif...
I am getting the itch to make bread/english muffins/pizza dough again but every time I have tried in the past, they look fine, but the taste like flour mixed with water and heated up.
I just saw this thread this afternoon. The quote above is a classic result of the dough not fermenting long enough. Fermentation causes flavor as the yeast consumes the flour's sugar and carbohydrates. Longer fermentation (rises) will get rid of the flour taste. I used to ferment my doughs in a 75°F to 95°F oven. Result was kinda flat tasting. 100°F is WAAAAY too warm, resulting in a fast rise. Now I ferment on the counter (66°F winter, 77°F summer) (breads and English Muffins) or in the fridge (pizza dough).

I have a recipe for English muffins with a poolish (simple process) that results in muffins that rival the ones from Thomas, both in flavor, nooks, and crannies. I need to rewrite it for a general audience, so standby.
 
Last edited:
Here's a quicker solution. Use the recipe you've been using. After you've formed your doughball in the mixer, place it in a lightly oiled bowl that will allow it to double in size. Cover that bowl with cling wrap or a lid. Then stick it in your refrigerator for 2-3 days for a cold ferment.

When ready to cook, let it warm on the counter for 3-4 hours, then portion, form, and rise the second time until double in size. You can use the cold oven but avoid that warm setting.

Griddle as normal.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SherryT
SmokingMeatForums.com is reader supported and as an Amazon Associate, we may earn commissions from qualifying purchases.

Hot Threads

Clicky