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Sumac Chicken Kebabs

smokin monkey

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Sumac Chicken Kebabs

4 Chicken Breats Cubed
3 tsp Sumac
Zest of one Lemon chopped
4 Garlic Cloves chopped
1/4 cup of good Oil
S&P

Mix all marinade ingridients in a bowl. Add chicken a cover with marinade. Marinade for minimum 1 hour, best over night.
Thread onto skewers and cook over a high heat, until Chicken is cooked through.

[VIDEO][VIDEO]

Back to the Smokin Monkey Cook Book http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/253497/the-smokin-monkey-cook-book
 
Last edited:

dirtsailor2003

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Sounds interesting. Video isn't working, at least not working using the mobile site.
 

SmokinAl

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Sounds great!

No video here either!

Al
 

b-one

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Looks great,you forgot to mention the shrimp!:drool
 

fwismoker

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I like it!   Soon I'll  be getting more into the spinning kabob world and I can't wait!
 

cliffcarter

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Sumac Chicken Kebabs

4 Chicken Breats Cubed
3 tsp Sumac
Zest of one Lemon chopped
4 Garlic Cloves chopped
1/4 cup of good Oil
S&P

Mix all marinade ingridients in a bowl. Add chicken a cover with marinade. Marinade for minimum 1 hour, best over night.
Thread onto skewers and cook over a high heat, until Chicken is cooked through.
Looks great
.

Just for clarification- the sumac you have in your recipe is not the same as the staghorn sumac we have in the states, which is a potent skin irritant, correct?
 

okie362

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Looks greatThumbs Up .
Just for clarification- the sumac you have in your recipe is not the same as the staghorn sumac we have in the states, which is a potent skin irritant, correct?

Glad you skied. I was about to. I'm not allergic to it but I've never eaten it either.
 

smokin monkey

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Looks greatThumbs Up .
Just for clarification- the sumac you have in your recipe is not the same as the staghorn sumac we have in the states, which is a potent skin irritant, correct?
Did not know this.

This is the official description on Sumac.

Sumac is a decorative bush that grows wild throughout the Middle East and parts of Italy. The dark purple-red berries are sold dried or ground and have a fruity, astringent taste. The Sicilian sumac and those berries grown at the highest latitude are said to be the best flavored of the sumacs. The berries are picked just before they ripen and dried. Sumac is used in the cooking of Lebanon, Syria, Turkey and Iran. Ground sumac is rubbed into meats for grilling and is good with potatoes, beets, and in mixed bean salads. Whole, cracked or ground sumac berries are also used to make a fruity, sour culinary juice which can be added to marinades, salad dressings, sauces and yogurt. This is made by soaking the berries 15-20 minutes in warm water, squeezing the berries to get all the flavor, and then straining the liquid. The juice can be added to food at the end of cooking. Crushed dried sumac is called somagh.


Hope this helps.
 

cliffcarter

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Did not know this.

This is the official description on Sumac.

Sumac is a decorative bush that grows wild throughout the Middle East and parts of Italy. The dark purple-red berries are sold dried or ground and have a fruity, astringent taste. The Sicilian sumac and those berries grown at the highest latitude are said to be the best flavored of the sumacs. The berries are picked just before they ripen and dried. Sumac is used in the cooking of Lebanon, Syria, Turkey and Iran. Ground sumac is rubbed into meats for grilling and is good with potatoes, beets, and in mixed bean salads. Whole, cracked or ground sumac berries are also used to make a fruity, sour culinary juice which can be added to marinades, salad dressings, sauces and yogurt. This is made by soaking the berries 15-20 minutes in warm water, squeezing the berries to get all the flavor, and then straining the liquid. The juice can be added to food at the end of cooking. Crushed dried sumac is called somagh.


Hope this helps.
Yes, thanks.
 

okie362

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Did a really quick look and evidently there are 35 varieties of Sumac.  Also learned (according to the internet) the Sumac we have in OK is not poison.  In-fact (according to the internet) Poison Sumac doesn't grow here.  Now I'm really confused and will have to do some more research. (sigh)
 

disco

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I love to see something different. Nice!

Disco
 

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