Stick Burner HELP

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Tfrank778

Fire Starter
Original poster
Oct 21, 2018
38
0
Last Summer I had purchased one of the original Oklahoma Joe's that was made in Perry Oklahoma. It 1/4" and the welds on it are impeccable. The smoker itself is in great shape and has no rust what so ever. One thing that I am having problems with is the heat distribution across the grate. I have a baffle plate installed and the temperature difference was over 100 degrees from side to side. Tried lowering the exhaust with aluminum duct and the same result. When the smoker is ran without the baffle plate the temperature on the firebox because over 300 no matter how small the fire.

I'm running out of things to try and was wondering what your inputs would be on how to fix this? I'm almost at my wits end and want to sell it, but I don't want to downgrade if I do. Any help is much appreciated.

Also on the pictures excuse me for how dirty it is... It hasn't had its spring cleaning yet...
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kruizer

Master of the Pit
Sep 7, 2015
2,694
1,385
Central Minnesota
I have a newer OKJ with baffles and don't seem to have that kind of variation. I don't know what to tell you. Mine will run about 50 degrees warmer on the fire box end than the stack end but that is about it. I do have a water pan on the firebox side though.
 

gmc2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Sep 15, 2012
14,478
9,993
The dryer vent mod allows for the smoke to stay in the chamber longer. Like kruizer said try a water pan next to you fire box.

Chris
 

Tfrank778

Fire Starter
Original poster
Thread starter
Oct 21, 2018
38
0
The dryer vent mod allows for the smoke to stay in the chamber longer. Like kruizer said try a water pan next to you fire box.

Chris


What exactly would this do for the heat distribution? With or without the baffle? Also what size pan?
 
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gmc2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Sep 15, 2012
14,478
9,993
Try removing the last baffle. It's been a long time since I've used a side fire box, but the water pan I believe should be big enough to cover the opening between the box and the cook chamber. It looks like your using lump - you may want to try briquettes instead. They pack tighter and run cooler.

Chris
 

gmc2003

Epic Pitmaster
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SMF Premier Member
Sep 15, 2012
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You could also try using a baking sheet or something similar to cover the holes or replace your first baffle plate(s).

Chris
 

Tfrank778

Fire Starter
Original poster
Thread starter
Oct 21, 2018
38
0
You could also try using a baking sheet or something similar to cover the holes or replace your first baffle plate(s).

Chris

So put the water pan beneath the cooking grate? Also I use lump to start the fire then transition to splits only
 

gmc2003

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
Sep 15, 2012
14,478
9,993
I put the pan on the cooking grate. I know I lost some real estate but it worked for me. As for splits I never used them but from what I've read they'll last about 45 min to an hour. So don't overload.

Chris
 

Heart of Dixie

Fire Starter
Oct 21, 2017
48
9
Chelsea, AL
I have an older Oklahoma Joe Longhorn, too but not as old as yours. Mine is a 3/16" thick version made by New Braunfels around 2003. I have a home-made baffle as well as a store bought Horizon. With either unit I got about a 60 degree difference from firebox to exhaust. One day I pulled the baffle about 1" off / away from the firebox bulkhead and everything evened out to within 5 to 10 degrees. It worked the same with either baffle. Another thing that really helped was to increase the exhaust to 4" using water heater pipe. On mine, the original exhaust pipe was just a hair under 3" ID, however the discharge port in the CC was 3 1/2". Attached is a picture of the home-made baffle.
 

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Tfrank778

Fire Starter
Original poster
Thread starter
Oct 21, 2018
38
0
I’ve tried moving the baffle and it didn’t help at all.

I’m in the same boat with the exhaust inlet to the CC being a hair smaller than 3”. How do you go about lowering it closer to the grate and making it 4” as well?
 

Heart of Dixie

Fire Starter
Oct 21, 2017
48
9
Chelsea, AL
I bought a 4" to 3" galvanized reducer. I got it at ether Lowe's or HD in the hot water vent pipe department. I drove the 3 ' side into the CC output and used the bolt that came off the original stack and tightened it in. I cut a slit on 1 side with my Dremel so it would drive all the way in. Next was a 4" x 4" elbow then a 4"x 36" straight piece. I cut the straight piece to length after running all the numbers through Feldon's BBQ calculator to get the correct length, here is the link: http://www.feldoncentral.com/bbqcalculator.html . When smoking I leave the firebox door wide open unless the wind is too high. I believe the exhaust mod improved the pit better than any other I have done, but if not for Feldon's calculator it would have been hit or miss. I also line the bottom of my 20" firebox with brick then set the grate on top of the brick in order to maintain 3 1/2" for air flow.
I hope this helps.
 

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Tfrank778

Fire Starter
Original poster
Thread starter
Oct 21, 2018
38
0
I bought a 4" to 3" galvanized reducer. I got it at ether Lowe's or HD in the hot water vent pipe department. I drove the 3 ' side into the CC output and used the bolt that came off the original stack and tightened it in. I cut a slit on 1 side with my Dremel so it would drive all the way in. Next was a 4" x 4" elbow then a 4"x 36" straight piece. I cut the straight piece to length after running all the numbers through Feldon's BBQ calculator to get the correct length, here is the link: http://www.feldoncentral.com/bbqcalculator.html . When smoking I leave the firebox door wide open unless the wind is too high. I believe the exhaust mod improved the pit better than any other I have done, but if not for Feldon's calculator it would have been hit or miss. I also line the bottom of my 20" firebox with brick then set the grate on top of the brick in order to maintain 3 1/2" for air flow.
I hope this helps.

My only issue is that my exhaust isnt bolted on it’s welded so I can’t get the reducer all the way in
 

Heart of Dixie

Fire Starter
Oct 21, 2017
48
9
Chelsea, AL
I understand. Mine is a newer unit so I am sure when the original company sold out many design changes were made. Try running your actual stack numbers through the calculator and see what length it comes up with. It might be a simple mod with what you already have. There are many of the originals like yours out there, hopefully someone that has experience with one just like yours will chime in.
 

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