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Spritzing diminishes Rub spiciness?

Millberry

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Joined Nov 12, 2020
Well-I learned a lot FAST. Thanks guys and gals so much. I'm realizing I was trying to learn everything too fast. Going from an electric I did not like, to a new smoker just got me pumped up full of questions. I am settling down. I'm just going to trim a little fat, simple rub, simple wood, put on smoker, take off smoker, let rest and eat. If things don't work out, I can always add water to pan, inject, wrap, spritz, mop, bug y'all and curse . THANKS AGAIN!
 

Bearcarver

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Spritzing heavily can wash off rub. A Fine Mist is all that is needed and don't give the meat a Bath.
Spritzing ONLY inhibits Bark Formation if you Don't Know When to Stop Spritzing!
Every 20 minutes for the First Hour of Ribs, with No Foiling, is fine and you will get good bark, Spritzing the first 3 hours or so of Long Cook cuts like Brisket and Butts, is fine as well.
How JUICY meat is depends on the meat, and No Amount of Spritz or Mopping can change that.The majority of your Spritz, Evaporates LONG before it can soak into meat and add back moisture. Remember, Hot Meat is Squeezing moisture OUT...This is how we get Pan Drippings for Jus and Gravy. No way is any Spritz going to overcome that Pressure and Soak in!
Spritz can add Flavor to the Bark, can enhance a Smoke Ring allowing more NO2 in before the surface cooks and can stop Bark from getting overly tough, but That's all Folks.🐷...JJ

To add to what JJ said above, if you have a well sealed insulated Smoker, it is wise to not Spritz, because every time you open that door, you're letting Hot moist air out, and causing the Temp to drop, and need recovery.
The only time I have to Spritz, is if I drank a lot of Beer! :emoji_bear:

Bear
 

tallbm

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Joined Dec 30, 2016
Well-I learned a lot FAST. Thanks guys and gals so much. I'm realizing I was trying to learn everything too fast. Going from an electric I did not like, to a new smoker just got me pumped up full of questions. I am settling down. I'm just going to trim a little fat, simple rub, simple wood, put on smoker, take off smoker, let rest and eat. If things don't work out, I can always add water to pan, inject, wrap, spritz, mop, bug y'all and curse . THANKS AGAIN!
Hahaha it never hurts to ask here, this community is awesome!

I always recommend to new or less experienced smokers that they have to tackle the following and preferably in this order:

  1. Learn your smoker/system
    • Learn your smokers Heat behavior - learn how the smoker behaves or wants to behave when it comes to building and maintaining heat (learn your vents, limits, how much fuel is needed and for how long for what temps, what are our temp swings like, what does your smoker do in windy and/or cold seasonal weather)
    • Learn your Smoke behavior - learn how you can best generate Thin Blue Smoke not thick white heavy smoke (learn chips, wood, pellets, AMNPS, mailbox modes, etc., then how much smoke and air and smoker temp affects on your smoke AND which woods work better than others, how seasoned wood should be for u, etc. etc.)
    • Learn behavior for Specific Cook Types:
      • how does your system and YOUR PRACTICES work for a long 10-20hr smoke (how much fuel, wood, temps)
      • how does your system and practices work for a short cook (30 min - 2/3 hrs)
      • how does your system and practices work for incrementally raising temperatures for something like a sausage or bacon smoke (raise temp 10-20degrees each hour)
      • how well are you prepared for a long or overnight smoke (wireless thermometers with high/low alarms, enough probes, what's your smoker's max cook time fuel capacity, what is your max cook time)
      • can you do hot and fast? how low and slow can your system handle?
  2. Know that each meat for smoking may have it's own practices and quirks you have to plan for and LEARN what is required for that smoke and how your system can/can't accommodate
    • Skin on poultry wants a smoker temp of 325F or higher or else the skin very, very, very often comes out like leather and is inedible. Skinless poultry can be smoked at any temp because there is no skin quirk to manage.
    • Brisket, Pork butts, and BEEF ribs are cooked when they pass the tenderness test not by time or temp BUT temp guides you on when to check for tenderness
    • Prime rib, poultry, pork loin, and more are cooked to temp alone to hit desired rare, medium rare, etc. tasting preference and/or to avoid drying out and making the meat tough
    • Learn details and quirks for each different meat, you will be amazed at how few cut's of meat actually share the same practices so you need different tools and practices in your toolbox to make the best version of the meat cut/food you are working with!
  3. Get a Well Prepared overall setup for successfully smoking meats and foods:
    • Wireless thermometer with alarms and ENOUGH probes (minimal 2, I like 6, many 2-4 probes) - some probes go in the meat and some go at rack level to measure temp where the meat actually is because u can never trust the smoker's onboard thermometers... and alarms help u when fires go out or flare up or alert you when meat has hit temp and is ready or needs a tenderness check
    • Brining buckets/tubs so you brine something that needs brining (whole chicken/turkeys, chicken/turkey breast, pork loin and tenderloins, etc.)
    • Fridge space for defrosting, brining, holding meat, etc. If you don't have the space then you can't do the meat/cook. I have a fairly empty garage fridge that solves this
    • Silicon bbq mats, Roasting Racks, trays, tongs, and other utensils that make life easy. I do 20lb+ turkeys on my single big vertical turkey rack set in foil pan. I do whole chickens on my dual vertical chicken rack that fits in a foil pan. I do jerky, fish, peppers, etc. on queue mats that fit my smoker racks and prevent stuff from falling through while allowing air, smoke, and heat to easily move through
  4. Learn the Finesse and details that make your dishes amazing vs edible or "just good"
    • Learn simple and amazing seasoning combinations for your meats (hint a base of Salt, Pepper, Onion, and Garlic is like 90% of winning the flavor battle for any meat but you add too or tweak for the extra "Finesse" win) - build up that spice cabinet!
    • Learn meat preparation methods like brining, curing, marinating, injecting, etc and when/how to use them for the type of meat you are cooking to make an often "bleh" dish like a turkey into an AMAZING flavor and eating experience (brine a turkey and to where temp in the breast just hits 165F and it becomes amazing!)
    • Learn how cutting/trimming the meat may drastically improve your overall end product and flavor
    • Learn how planning a cook properly along with meats that do/dont need resting greatly change things
    • Learn how you like wrapped vs unwrapped meats
    • Finally, learn the different flavors you get from different woods and combos on meat or even wood blending combos you like in meat. Your wood options may vary but man you can really dial on flavors and turn this bbq thing into a craft this way :)
I threw a lot at you there but basically work in the 4 different top level categories where the foundation are #1 and 2, and then grow into the various areas of #3 and 4 on your journey to making the most amazing BBQ and smoked foods your lips touch :)
 

Millberry

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
584
403
Joined Nov 12, 2020
Hahaha it never hurts to ask here, this community is awesome!

I always recommend to new or less experienced smokers that they have to tackle the following and preferably in this order:

  1. Learn your smoker/system
    • Learn your smokers Heat behavior - learn how the smoker behaves or wants to behave when it comes to building and maintaining heat (learn your vents, limits, how much fuel is needed and for how long for what temps, what are our temp swings like, what does your smoker do in windy and/or cold seasonal weather)
    • Learn your Smoke behavior - learn how you can best generate Thin Blue Smoke not thick white heavy smoke (learn chips, wood, pellets, AMNPS, mailbox modes, etc., then how much smoke and air and smoker temp affects on your smoke AND which woods work better than others, how seasoned wood should be for u, etc. etc.)
    • Learn behavior for Specific Cook Types:
      • how does your system and YOUR PRACTICES work for a long 10-20hr smoke (how much fuel, wood, temps)
      • how does your system and practices work for a short cook (30 min - 2/3 hrs)
      • how does your system and practices work for incrementally raising temperatures for something like a sausage or bacon smoke (raise temp 10-20degrees each hour)
      • how well are you prepared for a long or overnight smoke (wireless thermometers with high/low alarms, enough probes, what's your smoker's max cook time fuel capacity, what is your max cook time)
      • can you do hot and fast? how low and slow can your system handle?
  2. Know that each meat for smoking may have it's own practices and quirks you have to plan for and LEARN what is required for that smoke and how your system can/can't accommodate
    • Skin on poultry wants a smoker temp of 325F or higher or else the skin very, very, very often comes out like leather and is inedible. Skinless poultry can be smoked at any temp because there is no skin quirk to manage.
    • Brisket, Pork butts, and BEEF ribs are cooked when they pass the tenderness test not by time or temp BUT temp guides you on when to check for tenderness
    • Prime rib, poultry, pork loin, and more are cooked to temp alone to hit desired rare, medium rare, etc. tasting preference and/or to avoid drying out and making the meat tough
    • Learn details and quirks for each different meat, you will be amazed at how few cut's of meat actually share the same practices so you need different tools and practices in your toolbox to make the best version of the meat cut/food you are working with!
  3. Get a Well Prepared overall setup for successfully smoking meats and foods:
    • Wireless thermometer with alarms and ENOUGH probes (minimal 2, I like 6, many 2-4 probes) - some probes go in the meat and some go at rack level to measure temp where the meat actually is because u can never trust the smoker's onboard thermometers... and alarms help u when fires go out or flare up or alert you when meat has hit temp and is ready or needs a tenderness check
    • Brining buckets/tubs so you brine something that needs brining (whole chicken/turkeys, chicken/turkey breast, pork loin and tenderloins, etc.)
    • Fridge space for defrosting, brining, holding meat, etc. If you don't have the space then you can't do the meat/cook. I have a fairly empty garage fridge that solves this
    • Silicon bbq mats, Roasting Racks, trays, tongs, and other utensils that make life easy. I do 20lb+ turkeys on my single big vertical turkey rack set in foil pan. I do whole chickens on my dual vertical chicken rack that fits in a foil pan. I do jerky, fish, peppers, etc. on queue mats that fit my smoker racks and prevent stuff from falling through while allowing air, smoke, and heat to easily move through
  4. Learn the Finesse and details that make your dishes amazing vs edible or "just good"
    • Learn simple and amazing seasoning combinations for your meats (hint a base of Salt, Pepper, Onion, and Garlic is like 90% of winning the flavor battle for any meat but you add too or tweak for the extra "Finesse" win) - build up that spice cabinet!
    • Learn meat preparation methods like brining, curing, marinating, injecting, etc and when/how to use them for the type of meat you are cooking to make an often "bleh" dish like a turkey into an AMAZING flavor and eating experience (brine a turkey and to where temp in the breast just hits 165F and it becomes amazing!)
    • Learn how cutting/trimming the meat may drastically improve your overall end product and flavor
    • Learn how planning a cook properly along with meats that do/dont need resting greatly change things
    • Learn how you like wrapped vs unwrapped meats
    • Finally, learn the different flavors you get from different woods and combos on meat or even wood blending combos you like in meat. Your wood options may vary but man you can really dial on flavors and turn this bbq thing into a craft this way :)
I threw a lot at you there but basically work in the 4 different top level categories where the foundation are #1 and 2, and then grow into the various areas of #3 and 4 on your journey to making the most amazing BBQ and smoked foods your lips touch :)
I thank you very much.
 

Millberry

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
584
403
Joined Nov 12, 2020
I want to try Smokin'Als french onion injection. I want to put Dan's (forktender) Pickapepper sauce on, I want to try Jeff's "wooster" brisket,. I want to try Hot and Fast by ChasDev. I want to rub Molasses and peanut oil before the rub. I want to smoke in foil container like Myron Mixon, I want to try Johnny Trigg's ribs. I want to be another Aaron Franklin. I want to copy Malcomb Reed. I want to spritz cherry Dr. Pepper. I want a stick burner. ETC ETC ETC
BUT--This dummy has to take deep breaths. I am probably driving half the folks on this forum crazy. Hope I don't get kicked off. Everyone is so helpful.. It is unreal they even put up with my "kinda dumb" questions. Thanks tallbm and the dozen of you that responded to my ranting and raving questions. I am GOING TO TRY to calm down. Charlie
 
Last edited:

tallbm

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I want to try Smokin'Als french onion injection. I want to put Dan's (forktender) Pickaeppper sauce on, I want to try Jeff's "wooster" brisket,. I want to try Hot and Fast by ChasDev. I want to rub Molasses and peanut oil before the rub. I want to smoke in foil container like Myron Mixon, I want to try Johnny Trigg's ribs. I want to be another Aaron Franklin. I want a stick burner. ETC ETC ETC
BUT--This dummy has to take deep breaths. I am probably driving half the folks on this forum crazy. Hope I don't get kicked off. Everyone is so helpful.. It is unreal they even put up with my "kinda dumb" questions. Thanks tallbm and all of you they responded to my ranting and raving questions. I am GOING TO TRY to calm down. Charlie
Hahaha its good to see someones enthusiasm. I'd wager to say we were all there at one point and are there still at times :)
 

chef jimmyj

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Keep asking questions Charlie. When I came here, I had no idea there were Smoking Temps you try to maintain. I made a fire, put on some wood and whatever the smoker got to, was what I cooked at. I also thought, you need LOTS of Smoke, so I kept adding logs. The Ribs were Terrible! Tough and had a lip numbing acrid flavor. Even the Dog would not eat it. I threw the Ribs in the woods. They're probably still there, preserved by all the tar like Creosote!...JJ
 

Millberry

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
584
403
Joined Nov 12, 2020
To add to what JJ said above, if you have a well sealed insulated Smoker, it is wise to not Spritz, because every time you open that door, you're letting Hot moist air out, and causing the Temp to drop, and need recovery.
The only time I have to Spritz, is if I drank a lot of Beer! :emoji_bear:

Bear
Geez. Thanks so much !!!
 

Millberry

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
584
403
Joined Nov 12, 2020
Keep asking questions Charlie. When I came here, I had no idea there were Smoking Temps you try to maintain. I made a fire, put on some wood and whatever the smoker got to, was what I cooked at. I also thought, you need LOTS of Smoke, so I kept adding logs. The Ribs were Terrible! Tough and had a lip numbing acrid flavor. Even the Dog would not eat it. I threw the Ribs in the woods. They're probably still there, preserved by all the tar like Creosote!...JJ
God that made my day Jimmy. So you were worst than me? J/k. You made me feel so much better. I just went at everything wrong and maybe too much enthusiasm as tallbm said. I have realized my mistake - thanks to the most wonderful folks I have ever been around. Thank you sir. I appreciate what you said more than you know. Charlie
 

zwiller

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Joined Nov 16, 2016
It's very easy to be swayed by spritzing, sauces, rubs, and secret techniques/ingredients but the reality is good smoked food is a mastery of the basics. Your main objective are: 1) proper IT and 2) maintaining TBS. Everything else is debateable. A remote or instant read thermometer is essential. tallbm tallbm post is spot on and basically what is missing in BBQ books you buy and have to learn for yourself.
 

SherryT

Meat Mopper
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Joined Dec 23, 2017
I want to try Smokin'Als french onion injection. I want to put Dan's (forktender) Pickapepper sauce on, I want to try Jeff's "wooster" brisket,. I want to try Hot and Fast by ChasDev. I want to rub Molasses and peanut oil before the rub. I want to smoke in foil container like Myron Mixon, I want to try Johnny Trigg's ribs. I want to be another Aaron Franklin. I want to copy Malcomb Reed. I want to spritz cherry Dr. Pepper. I want a stick burner. ETC ETC ETC
BUT--This dummy has to take deep breaths. I am probably driving half the folks on this forum crazy. Hope I don't get kicked off. Everyone is so helpful.. It is unreal they even put up with my "kinda dumb" questions. Thanks tallbm and the dozen of you that responded to my ranting and raving questions. I am GOING TO TRY to calm down. Charlie
Oh, you ain't the ONLY one, Charlie! :emoji_stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:
 

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