• Some of the links on this forum allow SMF, at no cost to you, to earn a small commission when you click through and make a purchase. Let me know if you have any questions about this.

School me on why I need cast iron frying pans.

smokeymose

Master of the Pit
SMF Premier Member
4,793
2,256
Joined Aug 13, 2015
ci book.jpg Next time you're standing in a checkout line you may see something like this. Check it out.
Other than the non-stick aspect and being able to use them in the oven, on the stovetop or over an open fire I think what impresses me most is how they stay flat on the bottom. I have a $40 T-FAL that's already bumped up in the bottom so oil sits around the outside. Won't happen with a C.I. pan....
 

Murdy

Fire Starter
37
20
Joined Jan 10, 2019
Beyond just searing steaks, if you're making something like round steak or pork steak in gravy, you can sear the meat, develop some fond and deglaze the pan, which makes real good gravy. Same is true for sauces.
 

clifish

Smoking Fanatic
★ Lifetime Premier ★
Thread starter
940
720
Joined May 25, 2019
Even though "pre-seasoned" I would think a couple rounds of seasoning would be in order. We only have avacado oil in the house and that has a flash point of 480F - 520F, do I need to exceed these temps for seasoning? is it best to do it outside on a grill as opposed to inside the house in the oven?
 

Brokenhandle

Smoking Guru
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
5,282
4,036
Joined Nov 9, 2019
Even though "pre-seasoned" I would think a couple rounds of seasoning would be in order. We only have avacado oil in the house and that has a flash point of 480F - 520F, do I need to exceed these temps for seasoning? is it best to do it outside on a grill as opposed to inside the house in the oven?
No you don't have to go that high, I do mine from scratch or no seasoning at 350 degrees for several hours. And outside is good, it will leave an aroma in the house. Or at least nice enough to open some windows. Not as bad as something bubbling over in the oven and smoking.

Ryan
 

chopsaw

Epic Pitmaster
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
11,536
8,209
Joined Dec 14, 2013
I agree , 350 is the temp . I would start by frying some bacon , or if you have some bacon grease let that heat up in it . Once you get it " slick " you'll love it . Using them is the best way to season .
I use mine all the time . I've added a few since this picture . 2 of those are pans I ate from when I was growing up , and my Dad ate from one when he was growing up . Another is one from my wife's family , that she ate from growing up .
1641937210692.jpeg
 

OldSmoke

Smoking Fanatic
SMF Premier Member
396
594
Joined Sep 5, 2020
Love our cast iron pan. Scares the hell out of me handling it around the kitchen. One wrong move can do a lot of damage. I mostly cook with it on the BBQ.
 

thirdeye

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
3,057
3,719
Joined Dec 1, 2019
Soooo, I know there is a lot of love for CI pans here, what am I missing? What can these things do that I can't do in a stainless pan, my griddles or Dutch oven?? For $15 am I an idiot for not at least going back and getting them?
vuScoPA.jpg
Nostalgia comes to mind for me too. My oldest skillet was from my Grandmother and is ~110 years old. It could have been passed to her from my Great-Great Grandmother. The other pieces from her were made in the 40's and 50's. I have several griddles with bails instead of handles, and because the skillets come in so many sizes you can always find the size(s) that suit you. For me, the perfect skillet is a Griswold #9 which is 12". I have a lot of Lodge brand CI too.

Next is the fact I can cook with lower temp settings because CI holds the heat so much better, and it's very uniform. I like the fact I can go from burner to oven and I cook a lot of things on my BGE.
VYtv7Jn.jpg
UaoPEE5.jpg
VKfhPaL.jpg
1DU1VSZ.jpg
25 years ago I would have said I like the fact CI skillets are inexpensive.... but that's not true any more. :emoji_laughing:
 

bauchjw

Master of the Pit
SMF Premier Member
2,115
1,164
Joined Aug 3, 2015
View attachment 521900
Next is the fact I can cook with lower temp settings because CI holds the heat so much better, and it's very uniform. I like the fact I can go from burner to oven and I cook a lot of things on my BGE.

View attachment 521902

25 years ago I would have said I like the fact CI skillets are inexpensive.... but that's not true any more. :emoji_laughing:
Wow! Do you have a thread for those meat stuffed onions?
 
Last edited:

clifish

Smoking Fanatic
★ Lifetime Premier ★
Thread starter
940
720
Joined May 25, 2019
I imagine you have to heat them up for a while before putting in the food?
 

Sowsage

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
4,130
4,183
Joined Oct 18, 2017

spohnat

Fire Starter
35
36
Joined Aug 15, 2016
I love cast iron, enameled and regular. a le creuset skillet is my most used pan.

1. Durability. This is passed down in your family cookware that carries memories of cooks and meals. The downfall is how heavy they are as you get older (more on the dutch ovens, braisers, doufeus than a fry pan). Rust is your enemy but can be fixed.
2. The more you use it, the better the nonstick.
3. Easy to clean. Let the pan cool down before cleaning and do not soak it.
4. The heat retention is the best so you cook at lower levels. I sear a steak at 30-40% power on the stovetop. It takes longer to heat up. However, the temps do not drop from adding food, moving between stove to oven, etc.
5. Versatility as it's a workhorse. Breakfast eggs, searing a steak, making a pan sauce, baking bread: I'll use this pan
 

GATOR240

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
1,404
688
Joined Oct 15, 2017
I imagine you have to heat them up for a while before putting in the food?
Once I feel the heat in the handle I then add the food. Sometimes I will add a bit of vegetable oil before putting the food in but not always.
 

slavikborisov

Newbie
19
24
Joined Aug 24, 2021
Your blackstone is not cast iron. But i agree with you my stainless pans and blackstone will do anything a cast iron skillet will thats why i never purchased any.
 

mr_whipple

Meat Mopper
185
243
Joined Jul 3, 2021
Lotsa good answers but I can't say you "need" cast iron. I have a few skillets, a Dutch oven and a griddle or two and a cool loaf pan, but just like every pot, pan, or kitchen gizmo, it's just another tool in your arsenal. My plug would be the versatility as more than a one trick pony. Having some cast iron cookware around would certainly not hurt you in anyway.
 

clifish

Smoking Fanatic
★ Lifetime Premier ★
Thread starter
940
720
Joined May 25, 2019
So went back and got them for $15 includes a 10" and 12" They weigh over 15lbs for both.
ci1.jpg

Once I got home I remembered that when I bought my Masterbuilt propane smoker used it came with a smaller CI and I cut the handle off a large one I had lying around for chip trays. This was a few years ago, smoker has just been buried in the shed as I went to an electric with PID. So now I have 8", 10" and 2 - 12". I don't mind that I cut the handle off one of the 12" as it will fit into my pizza oven in PA for deep dish pizza or a wood fired apple pie. I will be taking everyone advice on cleaning the old ones and seasoning - Thanks Cliff
ci2.jpg
 

zwiller

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
3,050
1,589
Joined Nov 16, 2016
The pan is a tool. Use whatever you feel comfortable. I prefer carbon steel. Same premise as CI but less heavy (heats aster). Heads up tho, CI helps retain heat but is no a substitute for high heat. Unless you are equipped with a commercial range and hood, odds are you are better to sear outside with more power and ventilation. The flavor difference is astounding.
 

thirdeye

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
SMF Premier Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
3,057
3,719
Joined Dec 1, 2019
Wow! Do you have a thread for those meat stuffed onions?
Yes I do, it's right HERE. One thing I did not mention.... I pound out the standard thick cut bacon. Just cover with some waxed paper or clear and go to work. This accomplishes several things, first off you can get the thickness exactly where you want it, the length and width increase, and last a little pounding makes the bacon slightly sticky, which is a good thing when using it to wrap things.
kOxUlYT.jpg

Once I feel the heat in the handle I then add the food. Sometimes I will add a bit of vegetable oil before putting the food in but not always.
You mean it's not acceptable to spit in the skillet like you do to test the temperature of oil? :emoji_laughing:
 

clifish

Smoking Fanatic
★ Lifetime Premier ★
Thread starter
940
720
Joined May 25, 2019
The pan is a tool. Use whatever you feel comfortable. I prefer carbon steel. Same premise as CI but less heavy (heats aster). Heads up tho, CI helps retain heat but is no a substitute for high heat. Unless you are equipped with a commercial range and hood, odds are you are better to sear outside with more power and ventilation. The flavor difference is astounding.
Yeah ventalation is non existant in my kitchen, will do sear outside using the grill.
 

GATOR240

Master of the Pit
OTBS Member
★ Lifetime Premier ★
1,404
688
Joined Oct 15, 2017
Yes I do, it's right HERE. One thing I did not mention.... I pound out the standard thick cut bacon. Just cover with some waxed paper or clear and go to work. This accomplishes several things, first off you can get the thickness exactly where you want it, the length and width increase, and last a little pounding makes the bacon slightly sticky, which is a good thing when using it to wrap things.
View attachment 521933


You mean it's not acceptable to spit in the skillet like you do to test the temperature of oil? :emoji_laughing:
Depends on who I'm cooking for! :emoji_laughing: :emoji_wink:
 

Latest posts

Hot Threads

Top Bottom
  AdBlock Detected

We noticed that you're using an ad-blocker, which could block some critical website features. For the best possible site experience please take a moment to disable your AdBlocker.