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Rusty offset smoker restoration

fullborebbq

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If you are using standard sand in a hand held sand blaster you NEED TO USE A RESPIRATOR!!!!! BAD things happen from sand blasting dust!!!!
 

HalfSmoked

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Thanks for the like QProject it is appreciated.

Looks like the project is coming along great.

Warren
 

kmmamm

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When dealing with scale rust, it is much easier and faster to use a needle scaler (available at pretty much any discount tool supplier) Save the grinder and sanding wheels for cleanup once the scale is off. So far as surface prep on the outside surfaces, acetone would be the preferred cleaner...it will cut grease/oil residue better and faster than alcohol. If you do choose alcohol, be sure it is 100% denatured. Cheaper rubbing alcohols often contain up to 50% water....which will simply promote surface rust.
 

QProject

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Agreed that once you start oiling you're somewhat committed to that approach. The parts you've cleaned so far look strong and better for it. And you seem a competent fellow who values discretion being the better part of valor. Of course the lower parts will be weakest but you've got my blessing/support to "go to town" on the top and outward-facing parts and to use your best judgment on the rest.
Good luck.
I'm going to grab a wire wheel for my screw gun and go low n slow. Yes the lower already flaked quite a bit when I was removing ash and the leftover mess from the previous owner.

YES I'm kitted out in p100 mask, gloves, eyes and ears. That sucker it fighting back at me throwing hellacious barbs off the wheel and as the handle off my 18v makita portable doesn't fit this hf POS, I've now been literally attacked to the ground on 3 occasions!!! This thing is putting up one hell of a fight but this ol boy shall prevail! 🤣🤣🤣🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸

I went by o'reallys they didn't have high temp primer, only vht header paint? What am I looking for? Anyone have an exact product? I read recommend ations for 2000 degree primer at auto parts store guess I'll head fer AutoZone...
 
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QProject

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I bought Vht 2000 degree primer and rust-oleum 2000 degree flat black paint.

Do I need to heat cure twice? Once after priming and once after painting or just once at the end?

Where can I run lines for a waterproof inkbird probes? Do I need to drill a hole? I've only got one Thermometer hole on the top. Should I get lid insulators?

Didn't get much done today.
 
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chp

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Had some good fortune! The bolts came right off with a wrench!

Got most of the outside with the steel wheel. The legs are a mess and I'm willing to bet the bolts for the wheels are just as loose.
View attachment 473718

View attachment 473719 View attachment 473720
View attachment 473721 View attachment 473722

I'm gonna think on how to go about the inside tonight I might try something less powerful like a chucked steel wheel in a screw gun. It seems like to much rust to simply heat up oil and be done so I want to try and get as much off before trying that. I think I'll want to prime and paint before involving any oil so I don't mess up the paint prep with it

How about cleaning the outside before priming? Acetone or alcohol?

I'm actually amazed at the improvement so far and can't wait to have this bad boy fired up blowin smoke!!!
Thanks
Looks like great progress! I was able to get to the rust starting with an angle grinder with a wire wheel, then switched to a drill and wire end brush to hit the tough to reach spots and finished up with a die grinder for the toughest spots. I avoided the chemical solutions, but media blasting would certainly get it all.
 

QProject

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Looks like great progress! I was able to get to the rust starting with an angle grinder with a wire wheel, then switched to a drill and wire end brush to hit the tough to reach spots and finished up with a die grinder for the toughest spots. I avoided the chemical solutions, but media blasting would certainly get it all.
I went at the inside of the cooker just the top half and sides and it wasnt anywhere near as bad as I thought.

As for the bottoms of both the cooker and the firebox they are right clean them out. The previous owner was even using the cooker for grilling but not too bad. They never cleaned it out but it doesnt appear as old as I had thought. \

Suggestions for curing the primer and paint?

Also looking for ideas on a charcoal box or something to keep the wood off the bottom of the firebox as the grates were toast and got tossed in the trash?

Thanks everyone!

I plan to get back at it tomorrow. Go Chiefs!
 

chp

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I went at the inside of the cooker just the top half and sides and it wasnt anywhere near as bad as I thought.

As for the bottoms of both the cooker and the firebox they are right clean them out. The previous owner was even using the cooker for grilling but not too bad. They never cleaned it out but it doesnt appear as old as I had thought. \

Suggestions for curing the primer and paint?

Also looking for ideas on a charcoal box or something to keep the wood off the bottom of the firebox as the grates were toast and got tossed in the trash?

Thanks everyone!

I plan to get back at it tomorrow. Go Chiefs!
I’m no help on the paint, I oiled the outside of my project. The part for the firebox is typically just a piece of expanded metal cut to size.
 

bill1

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Joined Apr 25, 2015
...Also looking for ideas on a charcoal box or something to keep the wood off the bottom of the firebox as the grates were toast and got tossed in the trash?
Expanded metal is perfect but can get pricey. If you get a lead on some that is a little larger grid than you prefer, you can stagger two pieces together to make a smaller opening and keep your coals from falling through too soon. Hog rings work well for joining. Or just cheap "hardware cloth" can be set on top of a too-coarse-grid option and replaced each half dozen cooks.
Note some expanded steel is galvanized and hot coals will defnitely oxidize the zinc. Many worry about that in their food so you might want to intentionally remove it in a hot fire beforehand and wirebrush afterwards. With mask.
Sometimes old cooking grids from another cast-off unit can be cut to fit. Another (painful?) option is to re-purpose the outside shelves for charcoal grates and use some varnished wood for shelves?
Are you only going to put fire in the firebox, so you only need a small piece, or do you want the option of putting direct heat in the cooking chamber like a conventional charcoal grill, which requires a much larger piece. Do you need need new racks for your meat as well?
 

QProject

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Expanded metal is perfect but can get pricey. If you get a lead on some that is a little larger grid than you prefer, you can stagger two pieces together to make a smaller opening and keep your coals from falling through too soon. Hog rings work well for joining. Or just cheap "hardware cloth" can be set on top of a too-coarse-grid option and replaced each half dozen cooks.
Note some expanded steel is galvanized and hot coals will defnitely oxidize the zinc. Many worry about that in their food so you might want to intentionally remove it in a hot fire beforehand and wirebrush afterwards. With mask.
Sometimes old cooking grids from another cast-off unit can be cut to fit. Another (painful?) option is to re-purpose the outside shelves for charcoal grates and use some varnished wood for shelves?
Are you only going to put fire in the firebox, so you only need a small piece, or do you want the option of putting direct heat in the cooking chamber like a conventional charcoal grill, which requires a much larger piece. Do you need need new racks for your meat as well?
I greatly appreciate everyones input!

I got back at it again today and really got some work done. I did a slight wheel grind on the insides, did the legs and supports. Then I went back over everything one quick hit with the wheel. Followed up with a wipe down with acetone and a cut up tshirt. Applied the VHT 2k degree primer, 2 coats. Painted Rustoleum hightemp flat black on both the cooker and fire box but still need to flip them over and get the ends that hook together. I did prime those ends already just ran out of light and its supposed to be decent weather tonight. Back at it tomorrow and hope to finish up the paint maybe get started on some curing.

Should I cure first or go ahead and oil up the inside and get going on seasoning? Just charcoal or a mix?

I have racks for the cooking chamber but they are straight grates. Not planning on direct heat for the cooking chamber but might look into having someone fab me a new setup with an upper rack like I saw at one site for the OK Joes highlander, but not yet.

I was looking at charcoal boxes seems like I could just put one in as it would keep everything up off the bottom of the fire box and they are 12x12 and like $30. I seen a local metal distributor, metal by the foot, has expanded steel listed but doesnt say any details. I believe they fabricate too but would need to call them. I'm thinking the charcoal box would get me started out. Thoughts?

Thank you all!
QProject

Today's pics
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20201207_163759.jpg
 
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HalfSmoked

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Coming along great. Might be a smoked Christmas turkey in your future.

Warren
 

HalfSmoked

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Thanks for the QProject it is appreciated.

Warren
 

Heart of Dixie

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Joined Oct 21, 2017
I bought the exact same unit from Academy Sports 16 years ago and still use it regularly. Consider buying the 1.5" thick firebricks from Tractor Supply and just line the bottom of the FB. I put 3 across x 2 deep,then place a piece of 1/2" expanded metal on top of those using the edges for support. The 3/4" lets too many coals thru. This set-up gives me a 3"to 4' air gap between the top of the brick and the fire. I burn splits that are about 9 -10" long by 2-1/2 or 3 ".
Nice job on the restoration.
 

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