Remote temp probe brisket fail...again.

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Chasdev

Master of the Pit
Original poster
Jan 18, 2020
1,026
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I've tricked myself again with poor temp probe placement in brisket points (pretty much all I cook these days brisket wise) because even though I pull at 204 and hold at 160 for 6 hours, I get rubber band chewy meat.
I must be placing the probe too close to the bottom the of the meat and pick up grate temp rather than internal meat temp because the meat at that pull temp and with a 6 hour hold should be over cooked IMHO.
I guess I should probe the upper 1/3 of the point instead of the middle?
I'm not fond of repeatedly poking with a hand held unit as the holes leak tasty juices over and over again.
I'm going to reheat the rubber chew point slices to get them edible but this is turning out to be a "thing" and I'm getting pissed off.
 
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I always insert the probe from the side...gives you a better vantage point to make sure its centered but most important is what JckDanls 07 JckDanls 07 asked.Temp is just a rough guideline,probe tender is the indicator for doneness.I will start probing for doneness at 190 as I've had cuts done at that temp before.

Btw brisket failure can become chili winner!
 
Cube them up and make burnt ends or chili meat. There is a lot of fat veins in the point so chances are your probe is hitting one.

Chris
 
It's quite odd as I've been doing it the same way for years and years but the last two points I bought have both come out chewy, which to me equals undercooked.
I bought three at once a few months ago and I'm going to do #3 this coming week so stay tuned I guess.
Cube them up and make burnt ends or chili meat. There is a lot of fat veins in the point so chances are your probe is hitting one.

Chris
I just wrapped the siices in foil and cooked them in the oven for 2 hours at 275.
Much much better now.
The probe tip must have been flirting with the underside of the thick fat layer I leave on the meat to protect from the heat off the tuning plate.
I'm going back to hot and fast, I like the way the meat comes out and how fast it comes out and I'm worn out keeping the temps at 275, so 325/350 here I come! (again).
 
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As a new smoker, I learned this very lesson when using Jeff's Corned Beef recipe. Following ONLY the Thermoworks Smoker probe (and build in smoker probe) "done" temp that Jeff said--rather than using that only as a guideline, resulted in a tough brisket.

I have now forever learned from experts here that the far more important probe tenderness check (which I didn't do) has now become my most important cooking guideline.
 
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I've tricked myself again with poor temp probe placement in brisket points (pretty much all I cook these days brisket wise) because even though I pull at 204 and hold at 160 for 6 hours, I get rubber band chewy meat.
I must be placing the probe too close to the bottom the of the meat and pick up grate temp rather than internal meat temp because the meat at that pull temp and with a 6 hour hold should be over cooked IMHO.
I guess I should probe the upper 1/3 of the point instead of the middle?
I'm not fond of repeatedly poking with a hand held unit as the holes leak tasty juices over and over again.
I'm going to reheat the rubber chew point slices to get them edible but this is turning out to be a "thing" and I'm getting pissed off.
I've never bought just the point before, but I have separated a lot of briskets into point and flat for cooks. Any chance you put the probe into a pocket of fat? Presumably the temp in the rendering fat would be hotter than the meat, making you think you hit your number while the meat was not actually done?
 
The OP stated he only smokes brisket points. The issue with points is they will generally probe tender regardless due to higher fat content. The probing for tender / doneness on briskets is referencing the probing of the flat, not the point.
 
Are you cutting across the grain? It does run opposite the flat grain. Cut with the grain it would be tough / rubbery. Unlikely what's happening but thought I'd ask.
 
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Yes across the grain.
In this case it was under cooked, I wrapped in foil and ran two hours in the oven at 275 and it was much better.
It hit 204 at 5 hours and I thought that was fast but 204 is 204 and there's no way, other than chili,
to deal with over cooked meat.
I have 6 qts of chili in the deep freeze now made with burger meat so I don't need more made with dry brisket.
 
Yes across the grain.
In this case it was under cooked, I wrapped in foil and ran two hours in the oven at 275 and it was much better.
It hit 204 at 5 hours and I thought that was fast but 204 is 204 and there's no way, other than chili,
to deal with over cooked meat.
I have 6 qts of chili in the deep freeze now made with burger meat so I don't need more made with dry brisket.
I used leftover smoked beef for this and it was a huge hit. It was shoulder clod but brisket would sure work. Thread 'Smoked Beef French Onion Soup' https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/smoked-beef-french-onion-soup.291422/
 
Yes across the grain.
In this case it was under cooked, I wrapped in foil and ran two hours in the oven at 275 and it was much better.
It hit 204 at 5 hours and I thought that was fast but 204 is 204 and there's no way, other than chili,
to deal with over cooked meat.
I have 6 qts of chili in the deep freeze now made with burger meat so I don't need more made with dry brisket.
After seeing this additional information, I think you didn't rest long enough to get the carryover cook to get the meat tender. I've found that the faster you get to your target internal temp, the longer the rest needs to be because of how tough the meat naturally is. The fats need time to render down.
 
Personally I wouldn't be concerned to bring that temp up higher on a point. I'd rather cook points than flats (I've never cooked anything but whole packers tbh) But the point is my personal favorite part of the brisket due to its fat content. The point should be more forgiving than the flat for temps due to the additional fat. I also concur that probing the meat will also tell when it's done. If it's like sticking the probe into a warm stick of butter you're good. As with Brian's comment, cooking it longer if needed. Pressure cooker, wrapped, many way to accomplish this.
 
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