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Reheating Brisket

hmacmill

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I'm planning on doing a brisket flat on the saturday before superbowl.  What's the best way to reheat it for the next day?  Thanks for your help!
 

jirodriguez

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With flats that either don't have much fat, or no fat on them I have had the best results by putting the brisket and the saved juices from cooking the brisket into a crockpot on low for about 4 hrs. I find it not only reheats it, but also restores that nice butter tenderness to it.
 

les3176

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yep i too do the crockpot reheat.It works good and keeps the meat tender! I add some beef stock and some bbq sauce when i do mine.
 

hmacmill

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do you put it on the low or high setting?  Also, do you put the brisket in sliced or whole?
 

les3176

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i put mine in sliced,cause i always slice up my whole brisket when its done...don't know why,i just do LOL. I set the crockpot on low.
 

smoke 2 geaux

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I've been eating leftover brisket all week, so I have some insight on this one.  I saved the juice from from the foil and combined it with about a cup of cattlemen's bbq sauce.  It made kind of a nice liquid, without being as overpowering as straight bbq sauce can be.  I poured this back over the sliced meat in a foil pan and heated up in a really slow oven (like 180-200)  I normally do the crockpot thing and it works great as well, but this was an experiment that turned out nicely.  It made it through 3 re-heats without drying out.  Alas, i finished it up for lunch today..... I'm already looking fwd to the next one.
 

jirodriguez

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For the crockpot, put it on low. Sliced or whole doesn't make to much of a differance other than the sliced will heat up faster, but the end results are about the same. The main important thing is to save all them drippings from when you cook the brisket and use those plus additional sauce, liquid, broth, ect. ect. (if you need additional that is). You want approx 1-2 cups of liquid in the crockpot, depending on how much meat you have.

A great way to get some awesome ajus when cooking that flat is to put it in a covered foil pan with bottle of Killians Irish Red Ale when the internal temp hits 160°. The Killians adds a nice subtle flavor, that goes really, really well with brisket.
 

SmokinAl

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Yep crock pot. I slice mine first. I like the Killians idea. Problem is I drink em all before the brisket hits 160.
 

jirodriguez

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Yep crock pot. I slice mine first. I like the Killians idea. Problem is I drink em all before the brisket hits 160.
Do what I do Al.... one for the smoker, five for the cook! LOL
 

mballi3011

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I guess I'll be the redheaded step child here and say I always use a pasta/ steamer pot and re-heat that way. Now to me it keeps all the moisture in the meat and really brings out the smokey flavor too.
 

SmokinAl

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I guess I'll just get a 12 pack, There ought to be one left if I turn the temp up!   

 
Yep crock pot. I slice mine first. I like the Killians idea. Problem is I drink em all before the brisket hits 160.
Do what I do Al.... one for the smoker, five for the cook! LOL
 

eman

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I use the steam method for reheating also . You actually add moisture so you never have dry meat.

 Have used it on beef pork and poultry works great for all.
 

scarbelly

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I always seal mine with the juices in a vac seal bag then into hot - not boiling water and it heats up very nicely
 

oscuba

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Sous Vide. That is what was recommended by a Texas chef and it makes sense (he uses a giant commercial machine so he definitely uses water bath in his cooking). I added a bit of BBQ sauce thinned with water to coat (I'm making sandwiches with BBQ sauce and slaw topping). Adding moisture is more of a good feeling thing as it really will not add any moisture.

You don't need a Sous Vide machine for that. You can use a crock pot or a pot on the stove. For manual Sous Vide you will need to stir very often and have a temp probe in the water at all times. I recommend taking big pieces and reducing them. Mine is a pound and about perfect for warming to temp in 1.5 hours (a safe guess, most likely only an hour). 

Cheers!
 

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