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Loaf Pan Bratwurst & Loaf Pan Gyros

thirdeye

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Loaf Pan meats are somewhat common, but most folks make 'meatloaf'. With a change in technique, and a little time it's possible to produce what I call 'loaf pan meat', and it has a LOT of uses. We made some Loaf Pan Gyros a week or so ago and yesterday made Loaf Pan Bratwurst, and Loaf Pan Spanish Sausage. It starts off with practically any sausage-like recipe, but the finished product is much denser than meatloaf and some sausages.... think hot dogs or bologna. The ground sausage meat can be double ground through a finer plate, or blended in a food processor. This is just shy of an emulsion (which I hate to make) so it's closer to a 'protein extraction' meaning you only work it enough so that the protein and fat bond, there is no temping or icing like an emulsion. Here is the Gyro meat in a processor. You can add hi-temp cheese if you like, it holds up well.
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The bratwurst was a step down double grind like this
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The method I use is to put the meat into a loaf pan, smoke it or cook in the oven in the 350° -375° range until it reaches proper internal temp. If you add Cure #1 you get a nice pinkish color and the safe internal temp is lowered, and the texture is firmer which is a good thing. When it's done, the accumulated pan liquid is drained off and the meat is covered with foil. Then a second loaf pan is added with 2# or 3# of weight to compress the loaf. After a couple of hours, turn out the loaf meat to a rack and cool in the fridge.
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Here is the chilled Gyro meat (lamb and beef) followed by the chilled Bratwurst meat (all pork). Although these were sliced thin, the slices are somewhat sturdy, and the meat is easily heated by sauteing or a quick trip to the grill. It's great to take camping. All you are doing is warming it up and adding color. Like the sous vide guys say "It don't look like much now..... but wait for it".
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We made Gyros for a Greek dinner, and I cooked the Bratwurst for breakfast this morning.
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Since we had a hard boiled egg, it honestly took me about 6 or 7 minutes to make breakfast.
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The best thing about Loaf Pan Meat is that you are in control of the meats, fat content, salt content, and overall flavorings. Plus the meat freezes well. If anyone has any ideas for recipes or changes to the technique, let's hear 'em!!
 

Hamdrew

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You already know about weighting it down/compressing, so i doubt I can be of any assistance.

I will add that I am a fan of "freeform" meatloaves directly on the oven rack. Just roll it up in parchment, then a ziplock, SLIGHTLY OBLONG/EGG-SHAPED, and freeze it a little. Put it in "upside down" (if it were an egg), and you should have a pretty cylindrical loaf. Can apply the same upside-down egg shape to get ~perfectly round meatballs, too.

I am a fan of making gyro-seasoned meat like a pakistani seekh kabob. I like to freeze those a little, too, and preferably grill over a HOT kettle, but propane grills work fine too. Even broiled in the oven is fine, though you'll want to be ready for the smoke alarms to go off. Gets a great outer crunch, fast, with little-no risk of not being cooked through if using metal skewers.
 

sawhorseray

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Nice cook, Like! I believe you just inspired a flattop breakfast. RAY
 

buzzy

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I’m a big fan of cold smoked meatloaf sammies but like your method for different flavors. No stuffing just slice & reheat. Big like!
 

thirdeye

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You already know about weighting it down/compressing, so i doubt I can be of any assistance.

I will add that I am a fan of "freeform" meatloaves directly on the oven rack. Just roll it up in parchment, then a ziplock, SLIGHTLY OBLONG/EGG-SHAPED, and freeze it a little. Put it in "upside down" (if it were an egg), and you should have a pretty cylindrical loaf. Can apply the same upside-down egg shape to get ~perfectly round meatballs, too.

I am a fan of making gyro-seasoned meat like a pakistani seekh kabob. I like to freeze those a little, too, and preferably grill over a HOT kettle, but propane grills work fine too. Even broiled in the oven is fine, though you'll want to be ready for the smoke alarms to go off. Gets a great outer crunch, fast, with little-no risk of not being cooked through if using metal skewers.
If I'm understanding you...., the weight of the meat combined with it being upside down keeps the shape consistent?

I make free-form meatloaf, and pin strips of bacon on top. One of our favorites is a Mexi-Loaf which has 1/2 beef, 1/2 chorizo, coarser onions, roasted green chilies, and sometimes corn or hi-temp cheese. I do them on a rack on a pan because I never turn.
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thirdeye

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I’m a big fan of cold smoked meatloaf sammies but like your method for different flavors. No stuffing just slice & reheat. Big like!
The variety of flavor options is something I really like. Most of the loaf pan meats always look pale after chilling, so a slight saute adds some color.... but in all honesty even reheating slices in a microwave on a low setting covered with a damp paper towel does an excellent job.
 

DRKsmoking

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We made some Loaf Pan Gyros
Looks great thirdeye, love the process and the finished plate, LIKE for sure

i still make Gyros about once every 6 months. Here in Nova Scotia and most of Canada ( not all ) we call them Donairs. I worked with a Greek gentleman back in the 70's ( I know i am old also ) he started donairs here in nova Scotia He started with just lamb, than kept changing the percentage . Until he finished with a 100% beef. And the sauce " Tzatziki "was crushed cucumber's and garlic and other items . That changed to Can milk , granulated garlic, sugar, parsley and vinegar.
We mixed 90 lb's of 80/20 beef , spices and mixed in a large dough mixer at a time, than would take out the meat and beat/throw it in a ball on the counter like mixing dough. Put on large spit and stacked and shaved until formed . Than tie off and freeze. Each loaf was about 25 - 30 lbs each
Here is a couple old pictures of the meat and how it was cooked and cut, 1978 Canadian Hotel and Restaurant Don't laugh at the young Mr David
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I still pound the burger on my counter and nead like bread to make it tighter and no air. It slices like a roast , and like yours it does keep its form and does not fall apart while cooking

David
 

Hamdrew

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If I'm understanding you...., the weight of the meat combined with it being upside down keeps the shape consistent?

I make free-form meatloaf, and pin strips of bacon on top. One of our favorites is a Mexi-Loaf which has 1/2 beef, 1/2 chorizo, coarser onions, roasted green chilies, and sometimes corn or hi-temp cheese. I do them on a rack on a pan because I never turn.
View attachment 494808
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yup it should end up pretty cylindrical. here's a very quick one (maybe 10min in the freezer) from a couple weeks ago that ended up pretty square, sadly the angle kinda hides any depth perception-
loaf.jpg


i "honed my skills" rolling 100+ 5-6oz meatballs at an Italian joint every morning for years.. Downside to being good at something, I guess; that prep quickly became entirely my responsibility by one of the owner's command.. lol. i always tell people to roll it like a capsule/bullet if it seems difficult. It'll end up somewhat egg-shaped (fatter on bottom), UNLESS say cooked on a sheet at a lower temp and flipped halfway through but is a little safer/guarantee that it won't fall apart.

That Mexican chorizo loaf sounds real good. I'm a fan of making Mexican or Cuban (MOJO) inspired ones with ground pork. I make a mean "buffaloaf chicken" somewhat often for get-togethers, however they're obviously better as meatballs for crowds.
 
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Hamdrew

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Here in Nova Scotia and most of Canada ( not all ) we call them Donairs.
I would probably pick tzaziki if I had to choose, but made some of that delicious sweetened condensed milk+vinegar donair sauce just the other day when making gyro-seekh-kabobs. Growing up (hell, still to this day) my favorite spot to eat at in mall's is a Michigan-based chain "Olga's". They bastardize the hell out of gyros- honey in the dough to make them extra chewy, and a hybrid of tzaziki+donair sauce, and man is it good.

im honestly not sure which was first, what happened to the term gyro, but i do know that in Europe and the likely origin country Turkey they are "doners". i think schwarma and gyro are considered types of "doner", as well as the now-popular Al Pastor that originated in Mexico by middle-eastern immigrants.
 

DRKsmoking

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im honestly not sure which was first, what happened to the term gyro
I only ever knew them as Donairs, until i was on vacation in Florida and saw a Greek restaurant and they called them Gyro's which i was told meant round and round by the guy i worked for ., as they were cooked on a vertical spinning spit ,

David
 

Hamdrew

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I only ever knew them as Donairs, until i was on vacation in Florida and saw a Greek restaurant and they called them Gyro's which i was told meant round and round by the guy i worked for ., as they were cooked on a vertical spinning spit ,

David
Thanks! Now it almost seems obvious.. gyroscope.. LOL. I learned about donairs, the King of Donair etc., through the NS/Halifax based show "Trailer Park Boys", and "doner" from some cooking show.
 

SmokinEdge

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thirdeye thirdeye ,
This is very interesting. Have you ever made a bologna loaf? I’m thinking grind through 1/8 plate X3 or so and then pan it.
 

DRKsmoking

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the King of Donair etc., through the NS/Halifax based show "Trailer Park Boys"
Thats who i worked for many years ago, then he Franchised it as Mr. Donair with family members. He got out of the started back with KOD, than later passed away and family sold to another person who still has a few shops.
Trailer Park Boys is funny, i was not a big fan , but it was funny to see different places of around where i live. They actually set up a mock trailer park, and its kind of still there.

David
 

DRKsmoking

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I make free-form meatloaf, and pin strips of bacon on top. One of our favorites is a Mexi-Loaf which has 1/2 beef, 1/2 chorizo, coarser onions, roasted green chilies, and sometimes corn or hi-temp cheese. I do them on a rack on a pan because I never turn.
1619991642422.png
thirdeye, what's in the peppers, looks like black and brown beans with cheese. Was this done in the smoker And are they just bell peppers
ps: that loaf looks amazing also

David
 

thirdeye

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thirdeye thirdeye ,
This is very interesting. Have you ever made a bologna loaf? I’m thinking grind through 1/8 plate X3 or so and then pan it.
I've not made bologna loaf, only have don it in the chubs, but I'm sure it would be very similar. I've had olive loaf from the deli.

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thirdeye, what's in the peppers, looks like black and brown beans with cheese. Was this done in the smoker And are they just bell peppers
ps: that loaf looks amazing also

David
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Thanks for the kind words. You are right about the peppers, and this is more of a technique than a recipe because I kind of, sort of follow a recipe from the Barbecue Bible. The first version I saw had pumpkin seeds, pintos, and black beans but this recipe will give you the general technique. Some markets refer to poblanos as the dried form and pasilla as the fresh ones. But they are the dark green chile peppers that are kind of mild. And when you make it be very careful when selecting the peppers because they need to be somewhat flat on two faces, so when they are cut in half you have two boats that will sit kind of level on the grate.

 

DRKsmoking

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recipe from the Barbecue Bible
Just looked at the link. I like Steven Raichlen's stuff. I have his Project Smoke book. Those peppers sound good. I don't think i have seen those at the market. But i really was not looking for them. But when i did my ABT's last week i found some really nice and big Jalapenos and cut them like you showed on one of your posts. so i will try that store they might have or can bring in the poblanos , as a good friend works in the fruit and veg dept.
Thats the shape i like my bell peppers if i'm going to dice them for a meal.

Thank you
David
 

DRKsmoking

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1619998573560.png

these look wonderful as well as the crepes i think in the back
I know you answered this last week to me, in Steves recipe he says for cheese : pepper Jack, Monterey Jack, or white Cheddar cheese,
would these also not go grainy like my chedder did in my ABT's
Thanks
David
 

Hamdrew

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I've not made bologna loaf, only have don it in the chubs, but I'm sure it would be very similar. I've had olive loaf from the deli.


View attachment 494950
Thanks for the kind words. You are right about the peppers, and this is more of a technique than a recipe because I kind of, sort of follow a recipe from the Barbecue Bible. The first version I saw had pumpkin seeds, pintos, and black beans but this recipe will give you the general technique. Some markets refer to poblanos as the dried form and pasilla as the fresh ones. But they are the dark green chile peppers that are kind of mild. And when you make it be very careful when selecting the peppers because they need to be somewhat flat on two faces, so when they are cut in half you have two boats that will sit kind of level on the grate.

The markets aren't exactly wrong..

Northern MX, USA, and Canada, pasillas might be dried Poblanos, but elsewhere (and as found in many hispanic markets here) they are dried chilaca chiles:
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"Ancho" are always dried poblanos, and look much more like you would expect those peppers you posted to look like-
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..Then there's the issue, like with most other markets, of blatant misrepresentation. Pasillas as NM's, NM's as Guajillos.. There is almost certainly a mix with some guajillos and/or NM's in my bag of "pasillas".
 

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