Jersey Taylor Pork Roll, revised

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idasmoker

Newbie
Original poster
Sep 27, 2012
27
28
I see there's been some recent discussions regarding this sausage. I am the originator of this recipe that is posted on the Len Poli site. I just wanted to add a few comments on how I have made this recipe somewhat easier since it's been 14 years since I posted that recipe. Here's my recommendations:

No need to add any Port or other alcoholic ingredient. No need to seek out Maple flavor powder. Don't use ECA (encapsulated citric acid), it will not taste the same as using a proper lactic acid starter culture.

Pork butt: 70%
Bacon ends: 30% (need some extra fat and "smokey" flavor that bacon adds)
Kosher salt: 2% of the weight of the pork butt only - the bacon is already salty
The rest of the ingredients are based on the total weight of the pork butt and bacon ends/pieces:
Cure #1: 0.26%
Dextrose: 0.65%
Maple syrup (I use the one from Trader Joe's, but any one will work): 1%
White pepper, ground: 0.4%
Sodium erythorbate (helps with color retention and accelerates cure): 0.05%
LHP starter culture (or other fast acting culture that produces a pronounced sourly flavor): 1/2 tsp in 1/4 cup distilled water
(If you desire a less sourly taste you can use other cultures. Flavor of Italy is quite mild and I use it a lot, especially for Landjaegers)
Procedure:

Grind pork butt and bacon ends/pieces that are between 28 and 31 degrees F (never grind meats that are warmer or you will get smearing) using a 4.5mm or 5/32" plate. Meanwhile, get your LHP (or other starter culture) added to the distilled water. Add dry ingredients to the ground pork and bacon and mix well. Add maple syrup and mix again. Add the starter culture/water slurry and mix well until the mince is nice and sticky (several minutes).

Stuff into whatever size casing you desire. I like cellulose casings about 3 to 3.5 inches because you can stuff them very firmly without bursting. After stuffing prick the casing with a sausage pricker or needle to release any trapped air pockets.

Place into controlled chamber that can maintain proper fermentation temperature. I use a modified ice chest with a seedling heating mat that's controlled by a temperature controller and set it for 95 degrees F. After 18 hours my sausage measured 4.4 pH on my Hanna meat pH meter. Goal is between 4.4 and 4.8. 4.4 pH is quite sour so be warned.

I then recommend weighing your sausage and letting them cure further in a curing chamber set for 55 degrees F and 80% humidity until they lose 10% weight. Mine took 3 days.

Next, I sous vide the sausage at 152 degrees F. I simply wrap the pork roll in cling wrap (I get mine from Costco in the 18" wide roll) and tightly wrap it and then twist and knot the ends to keep water out. I sous vide it for 1 minute per mm diameter but I add about 20%, so for a 3" diameter or 77mm, I would go about 100 minutes. I wait until the sous vide temp shows 152 before starting the count down.

Finally, submerge the pork roll in iced water until it is cool, let it bloom some and you are ready to enjoy your endeavors.

Note: Check 2 Guys and a Cooler for very informative info regarding starter cultures as well as excellent sausage recipes.

Note 2: If anyone has access to fresh, genuine Taylor Pork Roll and has an accurate pH meter, it would be interesting to see the results. I left New Jersey over 50 years ago and have not seen TPR anywhere in the stores in Idaho, otherwise I would test the pH. I seem to recall it had a sourly note, but then again my taste buds 50-some years ago were different than now at age 70.
 
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Never had the stuff but the last thread we had got me interested in trying it. Your update has got me hooked as it close to my thoughts on it. Thank you for sharing!
 
Never had the stuff but the last thread we had got me interested in trying it. Your update has got me hooked as it close to my thoughts on it. Thank you for sharing!
I made some not long ago with a slightly modified recipe using FLC for a bit more mild acidification the LHP hits a little hard for me as does ECA. Finished the sausage in the SV at 152F
 
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I see there's been some recent discussions regarding this sausage. I am the originator of this recipe that is posted on the Len Poli site. I just wanted to add a few comments on how I have made this recipe somewhat easier since it's been 14 years since I posted that recipe. Here's my recommendations:

No need to add any Port or other alcoholic ingredient. No need to seek out Maple flavor powder. Don't use ECA (encapsulated citric acid), it will not taste the same as using a proper lactic acid starter culture.

Pork butt: 70%
Bacon ends: 30% (need some extra fat and "smokey" flavor that bacon adds)
Kosher salt: 2% of the weight of the pork butt only - the bacon is already salty
The rest of the ingredients are based on the total weight of the pork butt and bacon ends/pieces:
Cure #1: 0.26%
Dextrose: 0.65%
Maple syrup (I use the one from Trader Joe's, but any one will work): 1%
White pepper, ground: 0.4%
Sodium erythorbate (helps with color retention and accelerates cure): 0.05%
LHP starter culture (or other fast acting culture that produces a pronounced sourly flavor): 1/2 tsp in 1/4 cup distilled water

Procedure:

Grind pork butt and bacon ends/pieces that are between 28 and 31 degrees F (never grind meats that are warmer or you will get smearing) using a 4.5mm or 5/32" plate. Meanwhile, get your LHP (or other starter culture) added to the distilled water. Add dry ingredients to the ground pork and bacon and mix well. Add maple syrup and mix again. Add the starter culture/water slurry and mix well until the mince is nice and sticky (several minutes).

Stuff into whatever size casing you desire. I like cellulose casings about 3 to 3.5 inches because you can stuff them very firmly without bursting. After stuffing prick the casing with a sausage pricker or needle to release any trapped air pockets.

Place into controlled chamber that can maintain proper fermentation temperature. I use a modified ice chest with a seedling heating mat that's controlled by a temperature controller and set it for 95 degrees F. After 18 hours my sausage measured 4.4 pH on my Hanna meat pH meter. Goal is between 4.4 and 4.8.

I then recommend weighing your sausage and letting them cure further in a curing chamber set for 55 degrees F and 80% humidity until they lose 10% weight. Mine took 3 days.

Next, I sous vide the sausage at 152 degrees F. I simply wrap the pork roll in cling wrap (I get mine from Costco in the 18" wide roll) and tightly wrap it and then twist and knot the ends to keep water out. I sous vide it for 1 minute per mm diameter but I add about 20%, so for a 3" diameter or 77mm, I would go about 100 minutes. I wait until the sous vide temp shows 152 before starting the count down.

Finally, submerge the pork roll in iced water until it is cool, let it bloom some and you are ready to enjoy your endeavors.

Note: Check 2 Guys and a Cooler for very informative info regarding starter cultures as well as excellent sausage recipes.
Thanks for the update. What I made came pretty close to the real stuff, but I'm looking to try the fermented version soon.
 
I agree the LHP produces a very pronounced sourly flavor. You may well be better off using F-LC or F-RM-52.

By the way, the reason I use LHP this time is because I also made pepperoni according to my friend Eric's recipe as found on: https://twoguysandacooler.com/pepperoni/. He used LHP, so I figured I'd use the same culture for the pork roll. My pepperoni needs a couple more days in the curing chamber to lose some weight before sous vide time. I'll report back how it turned out here. Thanks guys.
 
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