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Grilling a Prime Rib

smokercub

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My grandson wanted prime rib so he brought over a 11lb roast for me to grill. My wife has cooked several of them in the oven and they came out very well but absolutely abhors messes in the oven (she cooks the roast uncovered at 500 degrees then turns the oven off and leaves the door closed for 15 minutes a pound). Even though they come out great, she didn't want to do this any longer. Last year, I grilled one on my Weber. It was a 7lb prime rib that had been in the freezer for at least two years. It wasn't the most flavorful roast in the world but it was edible. I grilled it at 250 degrees until internal temperature reached 135 degrees. I don't remember how long it took. Since my family likes prime rib that doesn't have a lot of seasoning on it , all I used was salt and pepper I think it was slightly overdone for our tastes (We all like medium rare) but it was edible. I want to make sure that I am doing it right this time so I am asking for your opinion.
The roast is 11 lbs. For medium rare, I want the roast to be about 125 degrees internally when I take it off. My plan is to coat it with a vegetable oil, salt, and pepper. My grill has three burner rods that run left and right across the grill. I tested the grill and with the back burner set at the lowest stetting, it runs about 250 degrees with the temperature probe in the middle of the grill. I am going to put the roast in a disposable tin foil pan. From the research online, it should be 15 minutes per pound or about 3 hours to grill the roast. I plan to cook it to 115 degrees and take it off and let it cook the rest of the way on its own. If I want more of a crust on the roast, do I turn the burner up higher at 105 degrees until 115 degrees to give it up a crust? What is some of your thoughts? Thanks
 

mike243

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I would put a cooling rack under the roast to hold it off the bottom of the pan so you don't get burnt on the outer edges, a higher cook temp is what will get you a good crust imo, always remember, even if under done when sliced it can be thrown back onto the grill for the picky people like my wife that don't want to see red or pink, if over done it will still be great, at med-well done is the true test of a piece of meat, you shouldn't have to eat meat raw to have a tender cut no matter what any body sez, sounds like ya got a great grandson to me :emoji_sunglasses:
 

TuckersBarbeque

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Yep, because it is such a short cook, relatively to get the 115 degrees, you will need a higher temp to get the crust (moisture has to significantly reduce it's evaporation). Assuming you have the bones out and you've trussed it with string, a solid sear on the grill or under the broiler for a few minutes should do the same. Think of it like a reverse sear on a steak.
Without much sugar or other rub, you won't get as much of a "crust" in 3 hours without a sear.
If you are using your grill as an oven/smoker, make sure you have a good thermometer in there. While you say it levels out at 250, your minimum relies solely on the external temperature without a PID or method to control the air flow being a gas grill.
Good luck man, I wish I had a grandson that brought me meat... sounds like a keeper.
 

smokercub

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I would put a cooling rack under the roast to hold it off the bottom of the pan so you don't get burnt on the outer edges, a higher cook temp is what will get you a good crust imo, always remember, even if under done when sliced it can be thrown back onto the grill for the picky people like my wife that don't want to see red or pink, if over done it will still be great, at med-well done is the true test of a piece of meat, you shouldn't have to eat meat raw to have a tender cut no matter what any body sez, sounds like ya got a great grandson to me :emoji_sunglasses:
Thank you for the advice of a rack. I grill hamburgers, steak, and salmon all the time with pretty good results, but a $145 piece of meat makes me a little nervous.
 

smokercub

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Yep, because it is such a short cook, relatively to get the 115 degrees, you will need a higher temp to get the crust (moisture has to significantly reduce it's evaporation). Assuming you have the bones out and you've trussed it with string, a solid sear on the grill or under the broiler for a few minutes should do the same. Think of it like a reverse sear on a steak.
Without much sugar or other rub, you won't get as much of a "crust" in 3 hours without a sear.
If you are using your grill as an oven/smoker, make sure you have a good thermometer in there. While you say it levels out at 250, your minimum relies solely on the external temperature without a PID or method to control the air flow being a gas grill.
Good luck man, I wish I had a grandson that brought me meat... sounds like a keeper.
Thank you for your reply. I have a Maverick ET733 that works well. I use it for steaks and get a good pink center every time. Yesterday, I turned on the grill to test the temperature and my thermometer and could not get the grill any lower than 244 degrees and that was with the back burner on as low as it would go. I really wanted to turn the front and back burner on to get a more even cook, but it gets hotter than I would like (with more than 1 burner edit) .
 
Last edited:

chef jimmyj

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I cook Beef Rib Roast in a similar way with one change. I Cook at 225 to 250 to an IT of 115. Then Pull the meat out for a 30 to 40 minute Rest on the counter. This is when I get all the sides ready and simmer the Jus or make Gravy. I then, in my case, crank the Oven to Max, 550. When heated, I put the meat in for 10 but no more than 15 minutes to Sear. Take it out wait 15 more minutes and Slice. No need for a longer rest as the roast already had 30 to 40 minutes resting on the counter...JJ
BTW...Dont sweat only one burner. The Average Temp in the box will be 244. You can spin the pan an hour in if you wish.

The last Rib Roast I made...

20210103_204813.jpg
 

smokercub

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So with a couple of good replies from TuckersBarbeque and Mike243, here is my adjusted plan. Turn the grill up as high as it will go, put the top (fat side) of the roast on the grill for 3 or 4 minutes to sear, then the bottom for 3 or 4 minutes. Then put it in a pan and lower the temperature to 250-275 and cook until 115 degrees. Take it inside and put a tent of tin foil on it for 30 minutes to about 125. Thanks again and if anyone has any more information, please add your comments to my post.

 

smokercub

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I cook Beef Rib Roast in a similar way with one change. I Cook at 225 to 250 to an IT of 115. Then Pull the meat out for a 30 to 40 minute Rest on the counter. This is when I get all the sides ready and simmer the Jus or make Gravy. I then, in my case, crank the Oven to Max, 550. When heated, I put the meat in for 10 but no more than 15 minutes to Sear. Take it out wait 15 more minutes and Slice. No need for a longer rest as the roast already had 30 to 40 minutes resting on the counter...JJ

The last Rib Roast I made...

View attachment 481437
Looks good!!! I hope mine turns out as well. I am going to sear it on the grill first since my wife doesn't want it in the oven.
 

chef jimmyj

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This was a couple weeks ago. 2 Feet of Snow on the Deck and Kettle. I used the Oven but in nicer weather I do the whole deal outside. If you try this Reverse Sear method, you'll want to rest indoors since it is so cold out...JJ
 

smokercub

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This was a couple weeks ago. 2 Feet of Snow on the Deck and Kettle. I used the Oven but in nicer weather I do the whole deal outside. If you try this Reverse Sear method, you'll want to rest indoors since it is so cold out...JJ
8-)
 

thirdeye

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Here is my prime rib guestimated time chart. Always use a thermometer, don't cook on time only.... but this chart will give you a general idea of what to expect. The majority of these cooks were done on a ceramic smoker (Big Green Egg, or Primo Ovals) or a upright (WSM or Drum) and the times are averages of probably 150 different cooks over 8 to 10 years. The shape of the roast is a big variable, as is bone-in verses bone out. I prefer an end sear if needed.... however 90% of the prime ribs I smoke get good color and I really don't need the end sear.

This is a boneless roast I smoked in my drum and the color looked good to me, so no end sear.
UMa3Ag1.jpg
n2FUqoT.jpg
itpzZrX.jpg

Using the 220°-250°pit temps, and a smaller boneless roast, you can expect a 5° to 8° rise in the internal temperature stated below while the roast is resting on the cutting board.. A larger bone-in roast might rise 8° to 12°. All the temperatures reported below are when the roast is still in the cooker, so take into account the rise.

4 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 2 hours to reach 125°
5-1/2 pound roast - 230° pit temp - 3 hours to reach 125°
5-3/4 pound roast - 245° average pit temp - 3 hours 45 minutes to reach 127°
6-3/4 pound bone-in roast - 250° pit temp - 4 hours to reach 125°
7 pound roast - 250° pit temp - 3 hours 40 minutes to reach 123°
7 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 3 hours 30 minutes to reach 125°
7.9 pound roast - 230° pit temp (dome temp) - 4 hours 5 minutes to reach 125°
8 pound roast - 250° - 275° pit temp - 4 hours to reach 122°
10 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 3 hours to reach 120°
11 pound roast (4 bones) - 215° average pit temp - 4 hours 54 minutes to reach 125°
14 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hours 30 minutes to reach 125°
15 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hrs 50 min to reach 127°
19.5 pound roast (prime grade) - 240° pit temp (dome temp) - 4 hours 25 minutes to reach 124°
 

smokercub

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Joined Sep 1, 2014
Here is my prime rib guestimated time chart. Always use a thermometer, don't cook on time only.... but this chart will give you a general idea of what to expect. The majority of these cooks were done on a ceramic smoker (Big Green Egg, or Primo Ovals) or a upright (WSM or Drum) and the times are averages of probably 150 different cooks over 8 to 10 years. The shape of the roast is a big variable, as is bone-in verses bone out. I prefer an end sear if needed.... however 90% of the prime ribs I smoke get good color and I really don't need the end sear.

This is a boneless roast I smoked in my drum and the color looked good to me, so no end sear.
View attachment 481533
View attachment 481534
View attachment 481535

Using the 220°-250°pit temps, and a smaller boneless roast, you can expect a 5° to 8° rise in the internal temperature stated below while the roast is resting on the cutting board.. A larger bone-in roast might rise 8° to 12°. All the temperatures reported below are when the roast is still in the cooker, so take into account the rise.

4 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 2 hours to reach 125°
5-1/2 pound roast - 230° pit temp - 3 hours to reach 125°
5-3/4 pound roast - 245° average pit temp - 3 hours 45 minutes to reach 127°
6-3/4 pound bone-in roast - 250° pit temp - 4 hours to reach 125°
7 pound roast - 250° pit temp - 3 hours 40 minutes to reach 123°
7 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 3 hours 30 minutes to reach 125°
7.9 pound roast - 230° pit temp (dome temp) - 4 hours 5 minutes to reach 125°
8 pound roast - 250° - 275° pit temp - 4 hours to reach 122°
10 pound roast - 220°-228° pit temp - 3 hours to reach 120°
11 pound roast (4 bones) - 215° average pit temp - 4 hours 54 minutes to reach 125°
14 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hours 30 minutes to reach 125°
15 pound roast - 220°-250° pit temp - 4 hrs 50 min to reach 127°
19.5 pound roast (prime grade) - 240° pit temp (dome temp) - 4 hours 25 minutes to reach 124°
 

smokercub

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I looked at your chart and feel very good about it. I have had it on the grill for an hour and it has gone from 43 degrees to 73 degrees., The grill temp is 250ish degrees and we plan to eat about 5:30. I think I am on schedule. Thank you for the great information.
 

smokercub

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So here I am at 1 and half hours later. The roast started out at 43 degrees and now is 86 degrees. I turned the grill up and seared the roast for 5 minutes each side. I then turned the grill down to 250 degrees. It looks good so far. I found this pan at Wallyworld so I can keep the roast from burning with the rack and catch the drippings for whatever I need to do.
 

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smokercub

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First, I want to thank everyone who responded to my post. The prime rib turned out almost perfect with your help, guidance, and instructions.

Here is the final report:

We pulled the roast out of the freezer on Thursday night and left it on the counter for 24 hours. Friday night, it was still cold, but not frozen so we put it back in the refrigerator. Saturday morning, I pulled the roast out and left it on the counter until noon where the internal temperature of the roast was 43°.

I fired up the grill and set it on high. I coated the roast with olive oil, salt, and pepper. I put the roast directly on the grill with the fat side down for 5 minutes. I turned the roast over and seared the other side for 5 minutes. The burners run parallel with the grill and I turned the front two burners off and the turned down the back burner to low. I put the roast on an aluminum pan with a rack on top to prevent the roast from burning to the pan. I placed it on the grill and shut the lid. The temperature of the grill after turning it down started at 318°. The temperature grill cooled down to 250°ish which is where I wanted to cook the roast. Through the next two hours, it was cooking nicely. At 2:22pm I got concerned that it was cooking too fast since dinner was scheduled for 5:00. I turned the grill down and opened the lid of the grill for a couple of minutes to retard the cooking speed. This worked since after this, it took it almost an hour to heat up 3 degrees. At 121°, I turned the burners up on high for 15 minutes. When the internal temperature of the roast reached 125°, I took it off the grill and took it inside. I covered the roast with tin foil for about 30 minutes until it reached 131°. I cut the roast into slices and served it. My wife made aus jus from a bottle and it was good.

The roast was incredibly good. It was tender, flavorful, and I will grill prime rib again using this technique. Thank you all again.

Lessons learned:

My daughter ordered the roast over the phone and my grandson paid for it. The roast did not have much fat on the outside nor was there much marbling within. It was still a good roast, but when we do this again, I will see the roast personally to make sure it is what I want. (Please don't get me wrong, I am not complaining at all. I just know now how to get a good prime rib.

I could have left the roast out on the counter from Thursday evening to Saturday noon and it would have been fine. It would have been room temperature to start the grilling. However, it was a minor error and the roast still turned out great.

Take the roast off the aluminum pan and place on a platter to cover with tin foil. I would have got a better seal with the foil and the juice would have been easier to drain off.

I sliced the roast before serving it. I should have cut a slice for each person as they waited for it instead of slicing the whole thing at once. It would have been much hotter and nicer.

(Side note: Since temperature readings are so important to this group, you can hold the alt key down and type 0176. This gives you a degree symbol °.)
 

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thirdeye

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It looks like everything turned out great in the end, everyone was happy, plus you sort of got more in tune with your grill and temperature control.... which is always a good thing. I've always said the hardest thing about cooking a prime rib is writing the check.... however, people get pretty nervous cooking something this expensive with a houseful of guests and all. The next one or three will be much more relaxed. :emoji_thumbsup:

No disrespect intended here... but thawing a roast on the counter for 30+ hours is not a good choice from a food safety point of view. The outer surface is simply in the danger zone (41° to 140°) for way too long and after 5 or 6 hours bacteria would start having a little party, possibly at your expense. Better is to slow thaw in the fridge for 3 or 4 days.

Trimming is very subjective, and on steaks I like some fat so it can crisp up and even drip into the coals. It's appealing to the eye, the nose and some people enjoy a bite or two. Something to consider with Prime grade (red stamped) beef is that is that it has considerably more intra-muscular fat than Choice grade (blue stamped) beef. This means the external fat can be trimmed very close, or removed all together and your roast will still be delicious.

These are steaks I cut from a Prime grade rib primal.
5JEMzTc.jpg
hfN4knX.jpg
I wish I had a before trimming photo of these Prime grade boneless roasts, but two of us split up 5 or 6 pounds of trimmings to use in sausage. We smoked these for a Christmas lunch at work and by trimming the fat, we got amazing bark and since we were using a cabinet smoker, an end sear would have been awkward.
Z0lA59z.jpg
We wound up with 7 or 8 trays of slices and a lot of smiles.
K3zuOtR.jpg
 

smokercub

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Joined Sep 1, 2014
It looks like everything turned out great in the end, everyone was happy, plus you sort of got more in tune with your grill and temperature control.... which is always a good thing. I've always said the hardest thing about cooking a prime rib is writing the check.... however, people get pretty nervous cooking something this expensive with a houseful of guests and all. The next one or three will be much more relaxed. :emoji_thumbsup:

No disrespect intended here... but thawing a roast on the counter for 30+ hours is not a good choice from a food safety point of view. The outer surface is simply in the danger zone (41° to 140°) for way too long and after 5 or 6 hours bacteria would start having a little party, possibly at your expense. Better is to slow thaw in the fridge for 3 or 4 days.

Trimming is very subjective, and on steaks I like some fat so it can crisp up and even drip into the coals. It's appealing to the eye, the nose and some people enjoy a bite or two. Something to consider with Prime grade (red stamped) beef is that is that it has considerably more intra-muscular fat than Choice grade (blue stamped) beef. This means the external fat can be trimmed very close, or removed all together and your roast will still be delicious.

These are steaks I cut from a Prime grade rib primal.
View attachment 481676
View attachment 481677
I wish I had a before trimming photo of these Prime grade boneless roasts, but two of us split up 5 or 6 pounds of trimmings to use in sausage. We smoked these for a Christmas lunch at work and by trimming the fat, we got amazing bark and since we were using a cabinet smoker, an end sear would have been awkward.
View attachment 481678
We wound up with 7 or 8 trays of slices and a lot of smiles.
View attachment 481679
Thanks for your input. Looks very good!
 

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