Engraving Ceramic 6x6 Tiles

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KBFlyer

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Mar 7, 2018
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So I have now experimented with (6x6 in.) ceramic tile engraving. The way it is done is by adding white paint to the tile which can be a pain in the ass to remove so by using Titanium Dioxide the product that makes white paint white can be bought for real cheap. All you need is a way to mix the Titanium Dioxide with a way to make it spread on your tile. Denature Ethanol 95% alcohol and mix with TiO2 and a teaspoon of PVA wood glue and mix it before applying to the tiles. When dried it stayed on the tile and did not get removed easily unless I wash it. When doing engraving the end result is quite similar with using TiO2 & Ethanol. I only need one layer. My engraving end result was darker then normal.
The engraving is burnt into the tile and will not come off even with hard rubbing. Detailed work takes a long time. This one was just over 3 hours. I like the results. This is a witch, I will not say who she is but I have so many in my life LOL

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Pretty cool. I retired from the paper industry and TiO2 was used a whitening/brightening agent in fine white paper for many years. It was the most expensive chemical used in the production of white paper...
 
Pretty cool. I retired from the paper industry and TiO2 was used a whitening/brightening agent in fine white paper for many years. It was the most expensive chemical used in the production of white paper...
Cool, you and I have very much in common then. I started making news print the company was called Great Lakes Paper. We made news print for almost every News paper in the the USA. By the time I retire 40 years later I had made many different types of paper from Bag stock (fast food) news print and phone book paper and many inbetween. My father in law worked in a mill beside us and made printing paper and beer lable paper so I know pretty much both sides of the paper industry. Not much left of making paper these days with computers and such. Thank god you can not wipe your behind with a I-Pad
 
Those are pretty cool....About how long to do one?

Jim
First one took just over 3 hours. Second one was just over 4 hours. I'm doing one right now and it says almost 5 hours. I'm guessing it all depends on the amount of detail in the photo and how dark you want it. The faster you go it will be much lighter. I really need to make a speed and power grid on one so I have some idea what the end product looks like.
 
I started making news print the company was called Great Lakes Paper.
I worked for International Paper for 27 years. All white paper, or uncoated free sheet as it's called in the industry. End use was mostly copy paper and envelope paper, some tablet paper. We made the paper that your bills are printed on and the envelopes they are mailed in...😄
 
Ya my mill was called Great Lakes Paper when I started back in 1975. Then it changed names so many times I had to look it up. One good thing is I have many different jackets with different logos to wear. LOL
I started out as a six hand and the last 20 years I was the working formen. I retired from that position. Do't miss the place but I do miss the guys I worked with for so long. They become family.

Historical timeline[edit]​

  • July 4, 1919, Organization of Great Lakes Paper Company Limited by Lewis L. Alstead and George A. Seaman; issue of letters patent
  • 1920 acquires a proposed mill site adjoining Fort William, Ontario; acquires rights to Black Sturgeon and other timber limits
  • 1923 Construction commences on groundwood mill
  • 1924 First groundwood produced
  • 1927–1929 Backus Brooks Enterprises of Minneapolis acquired the company and began erection of a paper mill.
  • 1927 Construction commences on newsprint mill with two paper machines. One machine to be largest in world
  • 1928 Operation of first newsprint machine "Judy"
  • 1929 Operation of second newsprint machine "Jumbo" then the world's largest; mill considered to be most modern paper manufacturing facility in the world.
  • 1931 Enters receivership due to parent company, Ontario-Minnesota entering receivership owing Great Lakes $2-million
  • 1935/1936 Group of 25 U.S. publishers purchases company from receiver; Ontario letters patent issued
  • 1937 Woods department established to reduce costs and establish control over wood delivery
  • 1940 Acquires Dog River, Lac des Mille Lacs and English River timber limits
  • 1953 Fox family of Montreal attains management control of company; executive offices move to Fort William
  • 1957 Number 3 paper machine "Jill" begins production
  • 1958 Completed Paper Machine 4 "Jupiter" built by Black Clawson Company; at the time the largest paper machine in the world
  • 1960 Horses no longer used in logging operations
  • 1966 "A" Kraft mill begins operation
  • 1973 New Kraft pulp mill
  • 1974 began to operate a 32-rail car capacity ferry, the Incan Superior, between Thunder Bay and Superior, Wisconsin on Lake Superior. The service ran until 1992
  • 1979 Canadian Pacific Investments purchases 54% after Fox family puts shares on market; name changed to Great Lakes Forest Products Ltd. (name changes to reflect company's expansion and diversification—newsprint, kraft pulp, stud lumber, waferboard; (latter two products no longer manufactured at this location); purchase of Reed Paper in Dryden, Ontario.
  • 1988 Canadian Pacific Forest Products Ltd. "CPFP" (result of merger between CIP Inc., Montreal, and Great Lakes Forest Products Ltd., Thunder Bay)
  • 1990 Number 5 Paper Machine "Theresa Marie" part of a $500 million expansion/modernization program, was built to replace the now-defunct Paper Machines 1 & 2
  • 1994 Avenor Inc. (publicly owned Company; CP Ltd. no longer majority shareholder: name change was inspired by the Latin root for advantage, meaning "going forward" and from the word, "north." Prior to the merger, Canadian Pacific Ltd. owned CIP and held 54.3% of Great Lakes with the rest owned by public shareholders. In September 1993, Canadian Pacific Ltd. divested itself of its majority ownership by selling all of its 36.7 million common shares in CPFP. Consequent to the sale, the company changed its name to Avenor Inc. Under Avenor, the Thunder Bay site saw the addition of the introduction of recycled fiber into and the rebuild/streamlining of its groundwood operation. A comprehensive modernization program upgraded the facilities to the top ranks of North American mills from both a quality and cost standpoint. Deinking equipment give the facility capacity for 992,000 tpy of newsprint with a recycled fiber content level of 20%.
  • 1998 Bowater Pulp and Paper Canada Inc. (through the acquisition of Avenor Inc., July 24, 1998, Bowater became the second largest producer of newsprint in the world and the third largest producer of market pulp in North America)
  • 2002 Bowater Canadian Forest Products Inc. January 1, 2002, amalgamation of two of Bowater's subsidiaries, Bowater Pulp and Paper Canada Inc. and Bowater Canadian Forest Products Inc. (formerly Alliance Forest)
  • 2007 Bowater Inc. completed combination with Abitibi-Consolidated to become AbitibiBowater on October 29.
  • 2009 AbitibiBowater files for bankruptcy protection in the U.S. and completes a restructuring.
  • 2010 Emerges from bankruptcy protection.
  • 2011 Operating name changed to Resolute Forest Products.
 
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Pretty cool. I retired from the paper industry and TiO2 was used a whitening/brightening agent in fine white paper for many years. It was the most expensive chemical used in the production of white paper...
That is why most of the paper comes from overseas, they do not care what it takes to bleach/whiten the stock.

Cool, you and I have very much in common then. I started making news print the company was called Great Lakes Paper. We made news print for almost every News paper in the the USA. By the time I retire 40 years later I had made many different types of paper from Bag stock (fast food) news print and phone book paper and many inbetween. My father in law worked in a mill beside us and made printing paper and beer lable paper so I know pretty much both sides of the paper industry. Not much left of making paper these days with computers and such. Thank god you can not wipe your behind with a I-Pad
yeah I am still in print business and it dwindles every year. Would like eek out a few more years before moving south.
 
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