Electrical Help??

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zhaley7777

Newbie
Original poster
Dec 13, 2023
17
6
i received my Inkbird ITC-106VH along with a SSR-40 DA and the wiring diagram looks very vague to me. It will be a 240volt and have 2 heating elements. Also will 10/3 wire be enough? I’m going to plug this unit into my dryer outlet in my garage. Any ideas? Here is a pic of what I have
 

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I hate to be a bad guy here but 240V 40A circuit is very dangerous. If you can't read the wiring diagram, maybe you should find someone who can to do the implementation?
 
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It's just 120V/20A on a wire. 🤣
I do have an electrician to do it for me I just wanted to get the materials ahead of time hence the pic of what I have so far. I guess my question was what terminals it was referring to for the elements and what wire to buy so I had it all when he showed up. It’s a family member so I didn’t want to make 3 trips to the store and waste his time
 
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Since it would only be 20A per leg, 12/3 should be sufficient IMO. 10/3 would be more efficient but not necessary.
 
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Missed this one
For safety you need two double pole relays to break both the hot legs.
I would use the 240 circuit just to power the heating elements.
10/3 SO cord is adequate as dryer circuits are usually 30 amp.
I would use a regular wall outlet 120v circuit to power the Inkbird PID. Its that safety thing again.
Breakers are dramatically different from 20 amp to 30 amp.
 
I hate to be a bad guy here but 240V 40A circuit is very dangerous. If you can't read the wiring diagram, maybe you should find someone who can to do the implementation?
I agree. It seems to me that in such matters it is better to seek help from a specialist.
 
I did not see this, but how many watts are your 2 heating elements (how many each)? That is the load that determines what amperage will actually be used and what wire gauge is needed along with what fusing/breaker for safety.

Also I did not see a heat sink for the SSR in your photo. Do you have that? It *WILL* be necessary as the SSR will get hot in use. Again, heat sink size depends on the load amperage (wattage of the 2 heating elements).

And there are a number of other parts your Electrician (family member) will need to complete the wiring. Things like connectors, buss strips to connect the power cord to and break out the 2 circuits to power the elements, PID & SSR, etc... plus connectors are specific to wire size. Just because it came with a 40 amp SSR does not mean you will need 40 amps of 240v power. It is probably way less for the actual elements unless they are huge (huge in power consumption, like 3,000 watts each).
 
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Until you give us info on the wattage. Or amp draw of the elements. Then we really can't give sane/safe answers.
Why are you interested in using the dryer outlet? And, is the dryer outlet a 3 or 4 wire configuration? If it's a 3 wire outlet. Then it won't work. You need a neutral for the controller to function.
For safety you need two double pole relays to break both the hot legs.
You'll need one DP/DT relay for this.
 
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And, is the dryer outlet a 3 or 4 wire configuration? If it's a 3 wire outlet. Then it won't work. You need a neutral for the controller to function.

You'll need one DP/DT relay for this.
I would never use a 30 amp breaker as a feed for 120 v circuit. The trip points are too high.
Thus my suggestion to use a separate cord from a 120V outlet to power the controller.

I didn't finish my thoughts on using 2 DP relays. I would want the option to operate only a single element. Simpler to turn off a relay than switching a 240V circuit
 
I would never use a 30 amp breaker as a feed for 120 v circuit. The trip points are too high.
Thus my suggestion to use a separate cord from a 120V outlet to power the controller.

I didn't finish my thoughts on using 2 DP relays. I would want the option to operate only a single element. Simpler to turn off a relay than switching a 240V circuit
Neither would I. He was suggesting a 220VAC circuit. And, that was also why I said this whole thing was a dog and pony show until the OP added more info.
If he is using this for a 220VAC system. He would need a neutral for the controller. Not for the heat elements. Having two power sources for the same panel is not a great thing as well.
 
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DON"T use 10 gauge wire on a 40A circuit. Min is 8AWG.
Now if you add 30A fusing (on both legs) you can get by with #10. And some dryer circuits are 30A anyway...check your panel.
What sort of heating element are you using? I'd be surprised if it's anywhere near 5000W. you're probably fine with 20A fusing.
Make sure your electrician friend is licensed...this is pretty important stuff.
 
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