Curing Prosciutto at Home (videos)........

Discussion in 'Pork' started by sausageboy, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. Lou Palma Prosciutto Project.....

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    How to make Prosciutto, Part 1



    How to make Prosciutto, Part 2



    How to make Prosciutto, Part 3



    How to make Prosciutto, Part 4




    SausageBoy
     
  2. smokinal

    smokinal Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator OTBS Member ★ Lifetime Premier ★

    Interesting video's!
     
  3. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

     This is only the early, Set Up for Drying Procerure....I need to CAUTION Members thinking about trying to make SALT ONLY Dry Cured Meats...IT IS DANGEROUS!  This video was shot in New Jersey in January when High Temperatures are a 40*F...It was Briefly mentioned that in Southern Italy Curing is Done at 70* but what was NOT said was, The Initial Salt Packing Time and Quantity of Salt is Increased to remove more moisture from the meat before hanging...In any event, this is not something that you start in warm months and the Process is best done in a Temp/Humidity controled Curing Chamber.

    If you plan to try something like this do some Serious Research First...JJ
     
  4. See the federal regulations for "Dry-Cured Hams" below as a guideline....

    Also....

    Hams should be cured for 5-6 days per inch of initial cushion depth , or one and a half days per pound of ham at a temperature of 36-38° F.

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    Hams are equalized in a 50 to 60° F environment for approximately 14 days to ensure that the cure is distributed evenly throughout.

    Hams are aged at 70° F with a relative humidity of 55 to 65 percent.

    § 319.106 “Country Ham,” “Country Style Ham,” “Dry Cured Ham,” “Country Pork Shoulder,” “Country Style Pork Shoulder,” and “Dry Cured Pork Shoulder.”


    (a) “Country Ham,” “Country Style Ham,” or “Dry Cured Ham,” and “Country Pork Shoulder,” “Country Style Pork Shoulder,” or “Dry Cured Pork Shoulder.” are the uncooked, cured, dried, smoked or unsmoked meat food products made respectively from a single piece of meat conforming to the definition of “ham,” as specified in §317.8(b)(13) of this subchapter, or from a single piece of meat from a pork shoulder. They are prepared in accordance with paragraph (c) of this section by the dry application of salt (NaCl), or by the dry application of salt (NaCl) and one or more of the optional ingredients as specified in paragraph (d) of this section. They may not be injected with curing solutions nor placed in curing solutions.
    (b) The product must be treated for the destruction of possible live trichinae in accordance with such methods as may be approved by the Administrator upon request in specific instances and none of the provisions of this standard can be interpreted as discharging trichinae treatment requirements.
    (c)(1) The entire exterior of the ham or pork shoulder shall be coated by the dry application of salt or by the dry application of salt combined with other ingredients as permitted in paragraph (d) of this section.
    2) Additional salt, or salt mixed with other permitted ingredients, may be reapplied to the product as necessary to insure complete penetration.
    (3) When sodium or potassium nitrate, or sodium or potassium nitrite, or a combination thereof, is used, the application of salt shall be in sufficient quantity to insure that the finished product has an internal salt content of at least 4 percent.
    (4) When no sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, sodium nitrite, potassium nitrite or a combination thereof is used, the application of salt shall be in sufficient quantity to insure that the finished product has a brine concentration of not less than 10 percent or a water activity of not more than 0.92.
    (5) For hams or pork shoulders labeled “country” or “country style,” the combined period for curing and salt equalization shall not be less than 45 days for hams, and shall not be less than 25 days for pork shoulders; the total time for curing salt equalization, and drying shall not be less than 70 days for hams, and shall not be less than 50 days for pork shoulders. During the drying and smoking period, the internal temperature of the product must not exceed 95 °F., provided that such temperature requirement shall not apply to product dried or smoked under natural climatic conditions.
    (6) For hams or pork shoulders labeled “dry cured,” the combined period for curing and salt equalization shall not be less than 45 days for hams, and shall not be less than 25 days for pork shoulders; and the total time for curing, salt equalization, and drying shall not be less than 55 days for hams and shall not be less than 40 days for pork shoulders.
    (7) The weight of the finished hams and pork shoulders covered in this section shall be at least 18 percent less than the fresh uncured weight of the article.
    (d) The optional ingredients for products covered in this section are:
    (1) Nutritive sweeteners, spices, seasonings and flavorings.
    (2) Sodium or potassium nitrate and sodium or potassium nitrite if used as prescribed in this section and in accordance with a regulation permitting that use in this subchapter or 9 CFR Chapter III, Subchapter E, or in 21 CFR Chapter I, Subchapter A or Subchapter B.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011
  5. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    SausageBoy....Now that's what I'm talking about...Doing Research...Great Job! and Valuable addition to your post...Thanks...JJ
     
  6. raptor700

    raptor700 Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Great post SB

    Very in depth and informative

                 [​IMG]
     
  7. There weren't always nitrates and nitrites but there's always been salt. Just sayin'.
     
    cycletrash likes this.
  8. But like JJ said. Be careful. It is a highly skilled art to make dried meats like the old world Italians. That's why I haven't done it. There is a reason that stuff is $20+ a pound.
     
  9. raptor700

    raptor700 Master of the Pit OTBS Member

        ??????????????????
     


  10. SausageBoy
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 28, 2011
  11. bmudd14474

    bmudd14474 Smoking Guru Staff Member Administrator Group Lead OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    This is a great thread. I deleted some posts from it because it was taking away from the thread.
     
  12. moikel

    moikel Master of the Pit OTBS Member

     
  13. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Smoking Guru Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member

    That Video of Mr Rice says it ALL...You start in Dec and Jan because you need 40*F for the first 4 weeks while you are in Salt...and..." We better know what we're doing!"  ...Thanks for the post...JJ
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011
  14. daveomak

    daveomak Smoking Guru OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Excellent thread... I think it is important to be able to follow the progression, throughout the ages, of curing meat and understand the "whys" to the way things have evolved to todays standards....
     
  15. FWIW......

    Here's a pic of an old prosciutto press.....

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    cycletrash likes this.
  16. moikel

    moikel Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    This is inside the Portuguese butcher shop near me.Must be 25  jamon hanging in there together with salt beef as well.. I picked up my chorizo supplies including their version of morcilla ,blood sausage. While I  was there some Brazilians came in to get ingredients for fejoda the national dish of Brazil.A black bean stew with all manner of cured [​IMG]& fresh pork products,sausage you name it.I made it in full once hell of a lot ingredients worth the trouble but you have to selectively disclose the ingredients for the non nose to tail eaters.
     
  17. skully

    skully Meat Mopper


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]........  surprised richtee hasnt called U a bonehead.....lol........ like he called me for sayin basically the same thing......he knows everything???????
     
  18. michael ark

    michael ark Master of the Pit

    Great thread.[​IMG]
     
  19. moikel

    moikel Master of the Pit OTBS Member

    Im with you on this,salt is as old as time itself. Making preserved meats came along not long after. From my Pork & sons cookbook written by a family of french butchers from Saint-Agreve ,mountain country. Really great book." Hams are dry salted,..by hand ..aromatic herbs  spices added to give character .The hams are put in special drying rooms where ventilation ,temperature humidity are carefully controlled The salt permeates the meat &matures it. It turns an intense red develops its aroma as the process speeds up Superior dry cured ham 210 days !" Author is Stephane Reynaud its by Phaidon press. Its about 3 generations of traditional pork recipes every possible thing you could think of from a family of french butchers. Not to late to drop a line to Santa ,better than socks & underpants!
     
     

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