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Correct use of Insta cure

rumgo

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Joined Nov 23, 2021
Hi there
I was wondering if I could get some advice on the correct use of Insta cure.
iam Currently curing two capicolas which have just about finnished there 14 days curing in salt and herbs. And I forgot to use Insta cure. My question is if I was to use it now just before I was to hang would the Insta cure still be effective? I am looking at a 4-6 week hang with instacure #2. I understand I should of used it at the start. Any advice would be much appreciated. Cheers.
 

indaswamp

Legendary Pitmaster
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Joined Apr 27, 2017
If you used fresh USDA certified meat and good sanitary practices; i.e-clean sanitary equipment, handwashing, and kept the meat cold- then cure #2 is not necessary for a whole muscle. This assumes that you do not have any deep gashes or recesses in the meat, nor any puncture holes.

Fresh USDA certified meat is assumed to be sterile internally. As long as you preserve the integrity of the whole muscle you can safely cure it with only salt. But it must be done dry, not in a brine.

Unless you want the color and taste change that the nitrite will produce, you could add the appropriate amount of cure #2 spread evenly over the muscle and return to fridge to allow the cure to absorb for another 10 days and then hang to dry. The cure will equalize through the meat over time.
 

indaswamp

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I also highly recommend using some form of casing on the meat-either synthetic or natural. This makes mold removal easier and gives a better yield as less trimming is necessary.
 

daveomak

SMF Hall of Fame Pitmaster
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Joined Nov 12, 2010
FWIW.... The nitrate and nitrite are there to kill botulism bacteria, which is prevalent everywhere..... It lives in the soil and is transported to creeks, rivers, your kitchen counter tops, carpet, etc.....
 

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