Cold smoked breakfast sausage question

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cptnding

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May 13, 2021
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Smoked bulk breakfast sausage was around when I was young but I haven't seen it in years. For a while I've been thinking about mixing up a batch with cure and cold smoking it. Does anyone have any experience with this or any thought on what might work best?
I've thought about pressing it out flat in a pan with parchment in the bottom, letting it set up overnight in the fridge, and then turning out onto a cooling rack for smoking. Thinking that might give more surface area for a stronger smoke flavor vs stuffing into a casing and then removing it from the casing after smoking.
 
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This goes on awhile , and some stuff is missing because of format changes .
Give it a look through . It's interesting if nothing else .
 
This goes on awhile , and some stuff is missing because of format changes .
Give it a look through . It's interesting if nothing else .
Thanks for the link chopsaw chopsaw . That was interesting. I have seen your posts where you use these bags for summer sausage and really liked the idea of that. I do wonder how bad the meat would stick to the bag with cold smoking only. I guess there's one way for me to find out lol.
 
I do wonder how bad the meat would stick to the bag with cold smoking only.
Good question . I bet it's not to bad . I looked back through that thread , and looks like he's storing in the bag , and slicing with the bag on .

I rinse the bags and wring them out when doing summer sausage , and they're really wet when stuffing .
I'm thinking for what you want to do that the bag should be dry , so no rinse before hand .

This is fully cooked , and hung to dry / cool overnight . No ice bath .
I make a cut 90 degrees to the stitching and peel .
20211101_072341.jpg

I would think if you stuff with the bag dry .
Cold smoke , and then store in the bag .
Slice through the bag when you want to cook some .
 
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Maybe you could follow the lead for smoking fatties, but go smaller diameter and let the logs set up a couple of days in the fridge?
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These non-stuffed beef sticks were hot smoked, but I would think they would handle cold smoking.
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Good question . I bet it's not to bad . I looked back through that thread , and looks like he's storing in the bag , and slicing with the bag on .

I rinse the bags and wring them out when doing summer sausage , and they're really wet when stuffing .
I'm thinking for what you want to do that the bag should be dry , so no rinse before hand .

This is fully cooked , and hung to dry / cool overnight . No ice bath .
I make a cut 90 degrees to the stitching and peel .
View attachment 689355

I would think if you stuff with the bag dry .
Cold smoke , and then store in the bag .
Slice through the bag when you want to cook some .
I ordered some cloth bags to give it a try. I don't want to store it in the bags so I'll see how it goes. Even if it's a complete fail getting it out of the bags I'd like to try making some summer sausage in them. Thanks for the help chopsaw chopsaw .
 
Maybe you could follow the lead for smoking fatties, but go smaller diameter and let the logs set up a couple of days in the fridge?
View attachment 689357
View attachment 689358
These non-stuffed beef sticks were hot smoked, but I would think they would handle cold smoking.
View attachment 689359
View attachment 689360
thirdeye thirdeye Something similar was what I was thinking initially. But just damn! That last pic has my mouth watering. What is that stuff? It looks amazing.
 
thirdeye thirdeye Something similar was what I was thinking initially. But just damn! That last pic has my mouth watering. What is that stuff? It looks amazing.
This is a recipe / technique from the Morton Home Curing Guide, that promoted their products Tender Quick and Sugar Cure (now discontinued). If I recall, this booklet was $1 and you just mailed them a $1 bill along with your address and they paid the return shipping. The booklet also has some examples of some early 'dry curing' or 'dry brining' methods for chops or chicken, and in addition has instructions for curing rear leg hams. It's probably on a webpage but here is a snip from the curing guide in recipe card form.

PS - I've modified the 'technique' for many different variations of the recipe.


dqK8A7O.jpg
 
This is a recipe / technique from the Morton Home Curing Guide, that promoted their products Tender Quick and Sugar Cure (now discontinued). If I recall, this booklet was $1 and you just mailed them a $1 bill along with your address and they paid the return shipping. The booklet also has some examples of some early 'dry curing' or 'dry brining' methods for chops or chicken, and in addition has instructions for curing rear leg hams. It's probably on a webpage but here is a snip from the curing guide in recipe card form.

PS - I've modified the 'technique' for many different variations of the recipe.


View attachment 689502
Very cool! Thanks for the info.
 
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