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Botulism concerns spur recall of boneless sardines

daveomak

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Botulism concerns spur recall of boneless sardines

By News Desk on January 23, 2021

Clover Leaf Seafoods Corp. is recalling two flavors of boneless sardines because it has been determined that they may permit the growth of Clostridium botulinum, which causes botulism poisoning.
The company triggered the recall, according to a notice posted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). The notice did not provide any details on how the problem was discovered or how the volume of sardines subject to recall.
Government inspectors are working with the company to find the cause of the problem. The investigation could lead to the recall of other products, according to the CFIA notice.
As of the posting of the recall notice no confirmed illnesses had been reported in connection with the recalled sardines.
Consumers ca use the following label information to determine whether they have any of the recalled sardines in their homes.
BrandProductSizeUPCCodes
Clover LeafSardines Boneless Fillets – Garlic & Chive in Oil106 g0 61362 46008 60170CBXP 2025 JN 18
0204CBXP 2025 JL 22
Clover LeafSardines Boneless Fillets – Smoked Jalapeño in Oil106 g0 61362 46009 30171CBXP 2025 JN 19
0218CBXP 2025 AU 05
0307CBXS 2025 NO 02
About botulism
While a variety of illnesses can result from eating under-processed food, one of the most dangerous is botulism poisoning. Untreated, botulism can paralyze the muscles needed for breathing, resulting in sudden death.
Anyone who has eaten any recalled products and developed signs of botulism poisoning should immediately seek medical attention, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
“In foodborne botulism, symptoms generally begin 18 to 36 hours after eating contaminated food. However, symptoms can begin as soon as 6 hours after or up to 10 days later,” according to the CDC website.
The symptoms of botulism may include some of all of the following: double vision, blurred vision, drooping eyelids, slurred speech, difficulty swallowing, difficulty breathing, a thick-feeling tongue, dry mouth, and muscle weakness. People with botulism poisoning may not show all of these symptoms at once.
These symptoms result from muscle paralysis caused by the toxin. If untreated, the disease may progress, and symptoms may worsen to cause paralysis of specific muscles, including those used in breathing and those in the arms, legs, and the body from the neck to the pelvis area.
(To sign up for a free subscription to Food Safety News, click here.)
 

daveomak

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Just a reminder... Botulism bacteria has been found in the viscera and gills of some fishes ....
The bacteria lives in the soil and migrates via runoff to creeks, lakes, rivers and probably finally into the ocean where fishes pick up the bacteria.....
Gilling and gutting your catch immediately, can be a good thing... Don't allow time for the bacteria to migrate... DO NOT allow viscera or gills to come in contact with exposed meat... Gut cavity membrane "should" be a short term barrier only... DO NOT freeze fishes guts/feathers etc... You will be looking at a second chance for the bacteria to contaminate the meat during the thaw...
Depending on what fish are eating, salmon cavities, in the Alaska seine fishery, have registered gut cavity temperatures over 100F while the carcass was in 32F refrigerated salt water fish hold... The fish have a very high protein diet and it cooks in the guts, like a compost pile... bacteria thrive in that environment...
 

Sowsage

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Just a reminder... Botulism bacteria has been found in the viscera and gills of some fishes ....
The bacteria lives in the soil and migrates via runoff to creeks, lakes, rivers and probably finally into the ocean where fishes pick up the bacteria.....
Gilling and gutting your catch immediately, can be a good thing... Don't allow time for the bacteria to migrate... DO NOT allow viscera or gills to come in contact with exposed meat... Gut cavity membrane "should" be a short term barrier only... DO NOT freeze fishes guts/feathers etc... You will be looking at a second chance for the bacteria to contaminate the meat during the thaw...
Depending on what fish are eating, salmon cavities, in the Alaska seine fishery, have registered gut cavity temperatures over 100F while the carcass was in 32F refrigerated salt water fish hold... The fish have a very high protein diet and it cooks in the guts, like a compost pile... bacteria thrive in that environment...
Good info Dave, we always keep our fish live when fishing until the ride home. Packed in a cooler on ice . only about 30 min drive until we get home to start cleaning them. I have heard of guys gutting AND removing the gills prior to packing the fish on ice when they are on long fishing trips that last a few days. I'm assuming this would help a lot in those situations.
 

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