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Aged Beef Tenderloin

Discussion in 'Beef' started by BB-que, May 21, 2019.

  1. BB-que

    BB-que Fire Starter

    So I’m about 2 weeks in on an aged beef tenderloin. My plan was 60 days as in the bag as I’m in no hurry to have it. Anybody have any experience with 45 opposed to 60 days? I’m thinking I’m gonna get the tenderness and flavor out of 45 but if folks tell me ya might as well do the extra 2 weeks that it make a big difference, then I will. Thanks in advance for thoughts
     
  2. From what I've read 30-45 days is great tenderness and little of that "aged" flavor. After 45 days the flavors get very pronounced. I'll know what that flavor is in about 2 weeks myself when I cook up a 50 day aged brisket.
     
  3. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Epic Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    You say 60 says in the bag...So this will be Wet Aged? You will get it more tender, as long as the seal is intact. But it's my understanding, there will be no significant flavor change. At least not the concentrated Beefy flavor from dehydration or that Dry Aged Funk. True Dry Aging would give a significant loss as all the leathery, surface jerky would have to be cut away. I'm definitely interested in the result, wet or dry...JJ
     
  4. tx smoker

    tx smoker Smoking Fanatic

  5. BB-que

    BB-que Fire Starter

    Dry aged
     
  6. chef jimmyj

    chef jimmyj Epic Pitmaster Staff Member Moderator Group Lead OTBS Member SMF Premier Member

    Butchers, Dry AgeTenderloins on the carcass. The spine protects the one side from drying out and a thick layer of Fat the inside portion. Dry Aging a Peeled and trimmed Tender might only yield about 50-60% of your starting weight. Be prepared to to eat a small portion of crazy good but stupid expensive beef. Very Cool!...JJ