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Texas Chili - whatcha got?

cybrslydr

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Few weeks ago, I used a recipe I found for a really nice Texas Chili. First time I've made one with beef cubes rather than ground. It was pretty damn delicious!!!

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I'm thinking of making another batch this weekend - was hoping to hear some of your thoughts about something similar I could try.

I like meaty, hearty chili. Spicy and smoky, but not so hot it blows your hair off.

Looking forward to what you have to say! :)
 

SFLsmkr1

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Looks good. Have you tried mexican chocolate
 

noboundaries

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Good looking chili! You used a chuckie, which is solid for cubed chili meat. If you want to kick it up a notch, try cubed brisket point. I rarely make chili if I have to use something other than brisket point it's that addicting. You can smoke it low n slow n nekkid for a couple hours before cubing it for the pot. Adds a subtle smoke flavor.

I use canned black beans pureed in a blender for a thickener. You don't taste the beans at all, but they add another subtle flavor dimension like the chocolate does. Still use the chocolate.

Reconstituted dried chilies, blended in a blender, eliminates the need for chili powder and adds a rich flavor element to the profile. Guajillo, ancho, pasilla are all mild and great. Toast the chilies in a hot pan for a few minutes until you see the oil start to appear on the skin. Then cover with boiling water, cover the pan, and let them sit for 20-30 minutes before blending. That water is good to use for thinning the chili paste in the blender.

Anyway. Several things to ponder.
 

cybrslydr

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Good looking chili! You used a chuckie, which is solid for cubed chili meat. If you want to kick it up a notch, try cubed brisket point. I rarely make chili if I have to use something other than brisket point it's that addicting. You can smoke it low n slow n nekkid for a couple hours before cubing it for the pot. Adds a subtle smoke flavor.

I use canned black beans pureed in a blender for a thickener. You don't taste the beans at all, but they add another subtle flavor dimension like the chocolate does. Still use the chocolate.

Reconstituted dried chilies, blended in a blender, eliminates the need for chili powder and adds a rich flavor element to the profile. Guajillo, ancho, pasilla are all mild and great. Toast the chilies in a hot pan for a few minutes until you see the oil start to appear on the skin. Then cover with boiling water, cover the pan, and let them sit for 20-30 minutes before blending. That water is good to use for thinning the chili paste in the blender.

Anyway. Several things to ponder.
From what I've read, using the black beans is a no-no for a Texas Chili. LOL

I like the idea of the brisket point, bit don't really have the means to smoke one currently (unless you can do it in an oven or something).

Few things I'd change from last time was putting the sautéed veggies and bacon in much later in the simmer. They practically simmered away to nothing. I want them to add a little more texture to the chili.

The part that surprised me the most was how pungent the cinnamon was and the flavor it added. Could smell it almost the whole time it was simmering.

Deffo want to use some dried chilis and powder them myself, but I need to buy a food processor first.

This is the recipe I used.

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noboundaries

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Solid recipe. Try a cubed brisket point, and your chili world will change forever.
 

cybrslydr

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I have friends from Texas. They used beans in chili.

That argument is second to "chicken or the egg".
Just to throw more fuel on the fire... :D

Every definition I've read says Texas chili has no beans or tomatoes. More like a spicy beef stew than a chili.
 

WaterRat

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I'm not diving into the "Texas Chili" debate but I do some nice chunky beef chili. You can find a cook I did here: https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/chili-time-the-return-of-chuck-and-ox.292613/
As for your veggies simmering away to nothing there's a couple thing you can do. First I do two batches of veggies, the first gets sauteed down until it's near mush and has some nice caramelization, this makes a great base for flavor and i find it makes "veggie glue" that partially negates the need for thickeners later. Then add a second batch that doesn't get cooked down nearly as far. You can also cut your veggies larger and use more, there aren't that many in your recipe. I also use some celery which holds up better in long cooks.

Since (if I read correctly) you're not smoking I would buy some quality smoked paprika
(no paprika in your recipe?!?!?) and other smoked chili powders if you can find them.

As for using dried chilies an el cheapo coffee grinder is alot cheaper than a food processor.
 

tallbm

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From what I've read, using the black beans is a no-no for a Texas Chili. LOL

I like the idea of the brisket point, bit don't really have the means to smoke one currently (unless you can do it in an oven or something).

Few things I'd change from last time was putting the sautéed veggies and bacon in much later in the simmer. They practically simmered away to nothing. I want them to add a little more texture to the chili.

The part that surprised me the most was how pungent the cinnamon was and the flavor it added. Could smell it almost the whole time it was simmering.

Deffo want to use some dried chilis and powder them myself, but I need to buy a food processor first.

This is the recipe I used.

View attachment 476849
That looks good! Recipe is more like a traditional Mexican dish for Mole (pronounced Moh-lay). Mole is usually made with chicken and is awesome!

Also there is a lot there which reminds me of traditional Mexican dish called a guiso (pronounced ghee-so) which is a "stew" but more like a braised dish in a skillet or pot than a soup/stew.

So I can imagine you enjoyed the hell out of it since its like a combo of the two dishes with care both amazing traditional Mexican cuisine hahaha.

I don't have have nay other suggestions for Texas style chili for ya and I live in Texas. I think "Texas Style" (no meat) is best with chili dogs and/or frito pie dishes.

I prefer chili with tomato and beans (still good for chilli dogs and frito pie) and when you decide to go down that route I'm sure I can help ya out as I do a couple of gooooood ones that are similar but one is the hardcore slow version and the other is the faster version :)
 

ksblazer

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I enjoy a good bowl of Texas Chili or Chili with beans.

Here is a pic of the last batch I made. It was Texas style.

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cybrslydr

Smoke Blower
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Joined Jul 18, 2017
I'm not diving into the "Texas Chili" debate but I do some nice chunky beef chili. You can find a cook I did here: https://www.smokingmeatforums.com/threads/chili-time-the-return-of-chuck-and-ox.292613/
As for your veggies simmering away to nothing there's a couple thing you can do. First I do two batches of veggies, the first gets sauteed down until it's near mush and has some nice caramelization, this makes a great base for flavor and i find it makes "veggie glue" that partially negates the need for thickeners later. Then add a second batch that doesn't get cooked down nearly as far. You can also cut your veggies larger and use more, there aren't that many in your recipe. I also use some celery which holds up better in long cooks.

Since (if I read correctly) you're not smoking I would buy some quality smoked paprika
(no paprika in your recipe?!?!?) and other smoked chili powders if you can find them.

As for using dried chilies an el cheapo coffee grinder is alot cheaper than a food processor.
I'll try that with the veggies next time - I've just pulled them out while the meat and sauce reduces then add it in as the reducing enters it's final stages.

You are correct, not smoking anything. I do have some smoked paprika in the cupboard, but this was the first time making it, so I wanted to follow the directions without adding too much in that way I know if I actually like the recipe or not. :)

As for the coffee grinder... I thought about using mine (but I couldn't find the requisite dried chilis, so I didn't make it this weekend - I went with the sloppy joes this time again), but I didn't want to get it gummed up with chili powder and then imbue my coffee with it - LOL I like Ethiopian blends that have a nice berry taste to them, so chili would not help. :D
 

KJNDIVER

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A friend from Texas gave me this "Texas Deer Chili" simple recipe that Ive been doing for a few years now that I get good reviews on from everyone. I live in La but work in Tx, and these folks all eat 2 bowls of it.... I cooked this just today for lunch at my parents house.

oil
venison steaks cut into cubes
1 large onion, chopped
garlic, minced
1 can rotel tomatoes
2 cans beans, drained (beans of your preference, I like kidney beans)
2 cans beef broth
2 teaspoons oregano
2 teaspoons cumin
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons smoked paprika

Brown and sautee the onions and venison. Add all ingredients , bring to low boil and let sit on that bloop bloop simmer for a couple hours. Cook some cornbread and put this on top and its damned good stuff.
 

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